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Broadcaster Press 5 August 22, 2017 www.broadcasteronline.com Dakotafest Annual There’s Something For Everyone At The State Fair Opportunity To Bring All Ag Groups Together By Gov. Dennis Daugaard: Before the season turns and the kids are fully immersed in school activities, there’s one more summer event you will want to experience. South Dakota’s great get-together, the State Fair, runs from Thursday, Aug. 31, to Monday, Sept. 4, in Huron. This year marks the 132nd State Fair, and it’s an event you don’t want to miss. For the last 10 years, the State Fair has charted a consistent trend of success, with year-over-year increases in virtually all areas. Since 2007, attendance has increased an incredible 40 percent, from 151,000 to more than 210,000, and with good weather, we may set another all-time record in 2017. For a few days each year, the fairgrounds become a community unto itself. Be sure to stop at the FFA Ag Adventure Center and ask a state officer how their year of service is going. Take a walk through the exhibition halls and chat with 4-H’ers about their projects. Visit with the vendors. Stroll over for some cotton candy or go on a carnival ride. Test your skill in the arm wrestling competition, the jitterbugging contest or the pork and chili cook-offs. You can experience a taste of the Old West at the bull riding and cowboy mounted shooting events. Sample a South Dakota beverage at the wine pavilion, or reminisce with an old friend on a trolley ride around the grounds. There really is something for everyone. The State Fair is a celebration of agriculture and the history of the industry which dates back prior to statehood. On the morning of Thursday, Aug. 31, at 10 a.m. at the Dakotaland Stage, we will celebrate South Dakota farms and ranches that have reached their 100-, 125- and 150-year anniversaries. If you plan to be in town I hope you can join me for that and for the Salute to Veterans ceremony which follows at 10:30 a.m. at the Northwestern Energy Freedom Stage. The ceremony is a chance to honor our veterans and their families for the sacrifices they have made. I am proud of our State Fair. It’s a one-of-a-kind celebration of agriculture and community. Consider marking the dates on your calendar and making plans to come out for at least one day. I hope to see you there. There’s Nowhere Else I’d Rather Be By Sen. John Thune Everyone has his or her happy place – a special location you would teleport to if you closed your eyes and wished hard enough, if it were only possible. Some people dream of the warm sand and a cool breeze on a beach, others prefer the bright lights and tall buildings of a big city. For me, it’s easy. There’s nowhere else I’d rather be, especially in the summertime, than crisscrossing the state and spending time with fellow South Dakotans. Whether we see each other at an organized event or at the fair or in the hardware store and whether the discussion is about federal policy or which school your son or daughter is heading off to this fall, I’m always interested in catching up. Listening to folks about the issues that matter to them and their family are what help recharge my batteries and refocus my attention on the most important part of my job: you. The last few weeks at home have been busy for me, which is exactly how I like to keep things, and fortunately, we still have plenty of summer days and nights to enjoy before the season comes to an end. I’ve already visited Webster, Redfield, Buffalo, Bison, Lemmon, Aberdeen, Arlington, Hayti, Milbank, Parker, Marion, and Mitchell, just to name a few. There are a plenty of stops yet to come. One of the most humbling experiences I’m fortunate to be a part of is when I get to present South Dakota’s military heroes with medals or awards that are long overdue. When I recently stopped in Webster, I had the privilege of presenting John B. Sinner, a World War II veteran, with the Bronze Star Medal. By Sen. Mike Rounds For more than two decades, Dakotafest has been an annual event that brings together ag leaders and producers from across the state together into one place. With nearly 500 agribusinesses on-site to showcase their latest products, it is one of the premier ag events of the Northern Plains. I was grateful for the opportunity to join Sen. John Thune, Rep. Kristi Noem and area producers for Dakotafest’s annual farm policy forum again this year. Hearing firsthand from South Dakota producers is critically important as we work toward smarter, better policies for farmers and ranchers. With the farm economy struggling and drought conditions affecting this year's crop across the state, this year's forum focused on the upcoming farm bill and how we can strengthen programs to help producers get through tough seasons. Maintaining and strengthening safety net provisions of the farm bill such as the crop insurance program remains my top priority in farm bill discussions. I also support raising the enrollment cap of the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), which was reduced from 32 million acres in the 2008 farm bill to 24 million acres by the end of the 2014 farm bill. During the forum, I also heard concerns about conservation easements, particularly perpetual easements which are often agreements made by previous generations and may no longer serve their purpose for current farmers or ranchers who tend the land. That's because perpetual easements are forever. I believe shorter-term easements would allow each generation to decide how they want to manage their land. During the last Congress, I introduced legislation that would make sure landowners know they have options for shorterterm easements when they enter into an easement agreement with the federal government. I will continue working to give our landowners greater optionality when it comes to perpetual conservation easements. Farmers and ranchers are also concerned about having access to capital, particularly during tough times like this in order to keep their operations above water. As a member of the Senate Banking Committee, I have been looking closely at proposals to provide additional capital to ag lenders who provide both commercial and residential loans to producers. We have heard from producers that increasing the cap on the Farm Service Agency (FSA) loan guarantee limit will open up much-needed capital for farmers and ranchers. With the current farm bill expiring in just over a year, it is important to begin discussions now about changes that need to be made in the next farm bill. Hearing firsthand from farmers and ranchers about their experiences with federal ag programs is crucial. We must make certain that federal policies work with - rather than against - our producers as they work to feed a growing global population. I thank those who took time out of their day to visit with us at Dakotafest this year and I encourage all those involved in agriculture to remain engaged in the coming year as we continue to shape the next farm bill in Congress. John has an amazing story. He served under General George Patton and was stationed in Belgium when the Battle of the Bulge broke out. He’s a true American hero, and I was honored to be a part of his day. Other highlights from my recent travels include discussing my farm bill proposals with the folks at Precision Soil Management in Redfield, hearing from Perkins County commissioners and residents about how they’ve been dealing with the drought, hosting a town hall meeting in Lemmon, stopping by the Turner County Fair, Brown County Fair, and Sioux Empire Fair, and summer wouldn’t be complete without visiting Dakotafest. These are my happy places. There are plenty of things in the world to be disappointed about, but I’m constantly reminded of how lucky we are in South Dakota to be surrounded by determined, optimistic, and friendly people. Whenever I’m in Washington, I take that attitude with me, and I have all of you to thank for it. It’s already been a great summer. Thanks to everyone who I’ve been able to meet and catch up with so far, and I look forward to seeing more of you soon! Exciting Things Are Happening At The South Dakota State Fairgrounds By Mike Jaspers South Dakota Secretary of Agriculture the annual State Fair, but for hundreds of thousands of people that come to the fairgrounds to enjoy the more than 100 other events the fairgrounds hosts. On any given day, you can come to the fairgrounds to see tractor shows, races or rodeos. We are especially excited to host the National Junior High Finals Rodeo, the second largest rodeo in the world, in 2018 and 2019. This rodeo draws contestants from 42 states, five Canadian provinces and Australia. I hope to see you at the 2017 South Dakota State Fair at the end of the month and that you enjoy everything the fair has to offer. I also hope you’ll take advantage of the many other events taking place year round. Exciting things are happening at the fairgrounds. Come check it out! Every year, it seems like summer flies by faster than the one before. For me, though, summer is never over until after the South Dakota State Fair. It’s one last chance to catch up with family and friends, take in a concert and watch a youth livestock show before my kids get busy with school and fall activities and harvest starts for me. This year, the South Dakota State Fair runs from Thursday, Aug. 31, through Monday, Sept. 4, with a preview night on the evening of Wednesday, Aug. 30. As you spend some time exploring the fairgrounds, I hope you’ll notice and appreciate many of the repair and renovation projects we have worked on over the past year. With an attendance of more than 211,000 people, Book 64 the 2016 State Fair was one Challenging Sudoku Puzzles by KrazyDad roadcaster ress of the largest in recent hisFill the puzzle so that every row, every column, and every tory. With the increase in the section contain the numbers 1-9 without repeating a number. number of fairgoers, renovaSudoku #1 Sudoku #2 tions for the restrooms and food court area were 9 3 9 especially needed. For the 2017 Fair, you’ll notice sev9 4 2 2 6 5 3 eral updated restrooms and as 3 6 bath houses,7 well as new 1 8 4 counters in the food court. probably also notice 5 2 You will4 construction 1 5 1 some ongoing in and around the grand9 8 2 6 stand. The grandstand will celebrate its 100th7 3 birthday 8 2 7 2 next year. Construction over the next 7 will continue1 as 5 work 3 3 2 couple months we to make sure it is looking it’s 7 1 9 4 7 2 best for that 6 celebration. Camping at the State Fair 8 is also becoming more and 7 1 © 2008 KrazyDad.com © 2008 KrazyDad.com more popular. To accommochallenging ch BOOK 64 #2 date this growing demand, Book 64: Answers now available Intermediate Sudoku Last tuesday’sPuzzles by KrazyDad camping is Sudoku #1 13, which is located Sudoku Solution #2 at Gate 1west of the 5 9 8 4 3 2 7 6 grandstand. 1 7 9 2 8 4 5 6 3 7Upgrades were made this 5 9 4 1 8 3 6 2 3 2Sudoku #4 9 1 4 8 7 6 5 Sudoku #3 5 6 4 3 9 1 8 7 2 8 4 6 9 3 2 7 5 1 spring to add 30 new electri1 9 982 1476 35 2 2 9 8 67 7 6 1 3 5 © 2008 KrazyDad.com cal pedestals 4 allow for to 5 6 1 3 2 4 8 9 7 6 1 3 5 2 8 4 9 7 direct electrical hookups for 7 4 6 6 3 9 2 8 1 check next Tuesday’s paper for 5 7 3 8 9 1 6 2 5 2 549 campers7at6Gate313. 7 8 2 4 9 1 8 7 2 3 5 6 the solution to today’s puzzle. 1 4 5 8 We’ve8made these up6 2 7 1 8 3 7 4 5 6 1 2 9 3 5 43grades2not 9 1 7for6 every1 9 only 4 9 2 6 3 5 8 5 4 2 5 6 9 1 3 7 4 8 int BOOK 64 #2 one that comes to enjoy bpp b Since 1934 Since 1934 Broadcaster Press P B bp Broadcaster bp B Press roadcaster Since 1934 Press Since 1934 su do ku Sudoku #3 8 1 6 4 6 5 3 9 7 2 2 8 Sudoku #4 3 6 2 8 9 5 4 1 7 1 By Daris Howard The Best Family I used to be Scoutmaster to eighteen boys. I’m not sure what happened in our community, but there were two sets of twins, and almost every child that was born at that time was a boy. They were great, though they weren’t above trying to challenge me to see if they could all take me. And I often found myself carrying two or even three packs up the mountain, and I never came down until I knew they were all safe. I’m not the scoutmaster anymore, but I still love being with the young men. I’m getting older; I’m struggling more. We hiked five miles into Hidden Lake in the Jedediah Wilderness this year. It wasn’t steep climbing like last year when we climbed Mount Borah, the highest mountain in Idaho. But we didn’t camp on Mount Borah, so we only had to carry food and water. This year my pack felt heavier than ever, but I still wasn’t far behind the boys. I must admit I did carry some extra things. I was on a high adventure with the young men once when we took horses into the Tetons. The horses and food were all paid for. The outfitter obviously didn’t know how much boys eat, and we spent a week being so hungry that bears didn’t dare come near us for fear we would eat them. Since then I have always packed frozen bread dough and oil to make scones. This year was no exception. And when we settled down for dinner in the evening, the boys happily enjoyed the scones and honey butter. As I shouldered my pack for the trip back out, it was much lighter, and the trip was mostly downhill. I was grateful because I was still so sore from the hike in that I could hardly walk. However, my muscles soon warmed up, and the soreness faded away. As we walked, I enjoyed listening to the young men talk. It helped me to know what was important in their lives. The boys were talking about one family in our community. They go on a big vacation almost every year. Quite often this includes a cruise or some other thing that few of the boys had experienced. The boys talked about the nice pickup that family had and how they traveled a lot and saw a lot of things. One of the youngest boys, Jason, was quiet as the others talked. When we arrived at the trailhead, we put our packs into the vehicles and climbed in to travel to another lake where we would spend the rest of the week. Jason was in my van, and as the other boys talked more about the one family, he finally said something. “I wish I had been born into their family,” he said. “They are so cool.” “What about your family?” I asked. “My family isn’t cool.” “Oh, really? Can’t you think of any good things your family does?” He was quiet for a minute, then shook his head. “Let’s start with the fact that your father is the scoutmaster and is up here driving the pickup with most of the gear and the canoes. And maybe your family doesn’t go on cruises, but how many times have you been on horse trips into the back country of Yellowstone?” Jason shrugged. “At least a couple of times every summer since I was five.” “There’s not a person in your family that can’t ride a horse, even down to your youngest sister,” I said. “And think of all the fish you caught in Hidden Lake. Then you cleaned them, and we cooked them. You can build camp fires, hike, and camp, and do things other families only dream of. You’ve probably been to more back country lakes than most people will see in their lifetime. Every family is the coolest in some way. It’s just that what we do becomes old and familiar to us, and we don’t see it as new and exciting. Some in their family are probably saying they wish their family was half as cool as yours.” Jason thought about it a minute, then grinned. “My family is cooler than theirs, isn’t it?” I just smiled. We’re all ears. Your opinion is something we always want to hear. Questions? Call, write us or contact Comments? us via e-mail and let us Story Ideas? know how we are doing. 201 W. Cherry •Vermillion, SD 57069 605-624-4429 • classifieds@plaintalk.net
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