Logo

Bookmark and Share


102417_YKBP_A9.pdf



Broadcaster Press 9 October 24, 2017 www.broadcasteronline.com Six More State Properties Listed On National Register Of Historic Places PIERRE, S.D. – Six more South Dakota properties were recently added to the National Register of Historic Places, according to the South Dakota State Historical Society. The listed properties are the Arthur and Ellen Colgan House in Edgemont, the Happy Times Carousel in Faulkton, the First Presbyterian Church in Flandreau, the American Legion Community Hall in Fort Pierre, the McWhorter House in Miller and the StadumGreen House in Sioux Falls. The National Register is the official federal list of properties identified as important in American history, architecture, archaeology, engineering and culture. The State Historic Preservation Office of the State Historical Society works in conjunction with the National Park Service, which oversees the National Register program, to list the properties. "South Dakota's history is rich in American Indian culture, pioneer life and change," said Jay D. Vogt, state historic preservation officer and director of the State Historical Society at the Cultural Heritage Center in Pierre. "Properties listed on the National Register are important for their role in South Dakota's culture, heritage and history. And when properties get listed, it shows that their owners take pride in their role in preserving that culture, heritage and history." Buildings, sites, structures and objects at least 50 years old possessing historical significance may qualify for the National Register, according to Vogt. Properties must also maintain their historic location, design, materials and association. Listing on the National Register does not place any limitations on private property owners by the federal government. Following is more information about these newly listed properties. Colgan House Built around 1900, the Arthur and Ellen Colgan House is located at 407 3rd St. in Edgemont. It is listed in the National Register for its architectural significance as a transitional form occurring between the Queen Anne and Colonial Revival styles. Distinguishing exterior features of the house include a wraparound porch with pedimented entries, cottage windows with leaded glass in a diamond and oval design and a three-sided bay window with decorative sawtooth woodwork. Happy Times Carousel The Happy Times Carousel, aka the C.W. Parker Carousel No. 825, in Faulkton sits in its original location at the corner of 9th Ave. and Court St. Built between 1950 and 1955, it was purchased at an auction by Robert Ketterling in 1981. He refurbished the carousel and began operating it for the local children. In 1991, the city of Faulkton purchased it. Volunteers still operate it seasonally several days a week. In addition to being listed on the National Register for Entertainment/Recreation, it is also listed for Art and Engineering. Though it does not have the hand-carved horses of earlier carousels, its aluminum horses, center wood panels with motifs of dancing figures, stars, seahorses or dragons, organ pipes and wood rounding board panels with circle and undulating designs convey a sense of public art. The fact that the carousel is still used as designed originally, as opposed to being collected and displayed, increases its societal value as community art. First Presbyterian Church Flandreau’s First Presbyterian Church, built in 1873, is the oldest, continually used church in South Dakota. Located at 22712 SD Hwy. 13, the church and connected cemetery are listed in the National Register S.D. State Parks To Host Halloween Events PIERRE, S.D. – South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks (GFP) will host trick-or-treaters at special events this Halloween season. Make plans to attend a Halloween event: •Halloween Hike at the Outdoor Campus in Sioux Falls, Saturday, Oct. 21, 3-6 p.m. CT. •Halloween Hike at the Outdoor Campus in Rapid City, Friday, Oct. 27, 5-8 p.m. MT. •Halloween Hike at Custer State Park, Friday and Saturday, Oct. 27-28, 5:30 to 8 p.m. MDT at the Peter Norbeck Outdoor Education Center. Hikes depart every 15 minutes. Reservations required: 605.255.4464 •Trick-or-Treat Trails at Big Sioux Recreation Area near Brandon, Saturday, Oct. 28, 5-8 p.m. CT. •Trick-or-Treat Trails at LaFramboise Island in Pierre, Sunday, Oct. 29, 4-7 p.m. CT. There is no cost to participate in the hikes, but a park entrance license is required where applicable. Participants should wear comfortable hiking shoes and dress for the weather. Children must be accompanied by adults. Costumes are encouraged for the hikes but not required. For more information on GFP events, visit gfp.sd.gov. SD State Fair Sees Increased Attendance in two areas. The first is under Religious Properties. This is because of the church’s significant association with the earliest settlement of the Flandreau homestead colony by the Mdewakanton Dakota American Indians and with the leadership of Rev. John Eastman for his involvement in the religious, social and political life of the community. It is also listed for Graves because of the burial of the repatriated remains of Taoyateduta/Little Crow. Taoyateduta was a significant leader of the Mdewakanton Dakota during the 1862 U.S.-Dakota Conflict. He was killed in Minnesota in 1863 but his remains were not returned to his descendants until 1971. American Legion The American Legion Community Hall in Fort Pierre was built in 1933 when the Fort Pierre Commercial Club and the American Legion post joined forces with local businesses and civic organizations to raise money for the building located at 115 Deadwood Street. From 1933 into the early 1950s, concerts, plays, dances, card parties, game nights, 4-H shows, Christmas parties and other community activities were common occurrences. It continued to be used for a number of public activities in the 1950s and 1960s, but its front offices were also leased to local businesses. In 1968, the Historical Society of Old Stanley County converted the building into a museum. Today, the Verendrye Museum continues to occupy the building. The hall is listed on the National Register for Entertainment/Recreation, Social History and Architecture. It is a good example of a one-part commercial block with Mission influences in a small-town South Dakota setting. It is the only known Mission-influenced building in Fort Pierre. Centered toward the top of the parapet is a stone Legion emblem of a five-point star surrounded by a wreath. McWhorter House After medical school in 1904, Dr. Port McWhorter returned to his hometown of Miller and joined the local medical practice of Dr. W.H. Lane. He helped build the foundation of what would become one of Miller’s most enduring medical practices. In 1906 McWhorter married a local woman, Helen Waters. That same year they had a Queen Anne-style house built for them at 426 N. Broadway. The first floor of the house was McWhorter’s clinic. McWhorter served the town for 22 years. He and Helen continued to own their house in Miller after moving to California in 1926. In 1938, they donated it to the Miller Independent School District. It was used to board rural children attending school. The house served other needs of the district for many years before being converted into a museum. The house is listed in the National Register for Health/Medicine and Education and also for Architecture. Stadum-Green House Located at 2101 S. Pendar Lane in Sioux Falls, the Stadum-Green House was built in 1938. Listed on the National Register for Architecture, it is representative of the American Small House type. The house has retained a high integrity of setting, location, material, design, workmanship, feeling and association. It accurately conveys the architectural history of residential construction in Sioux Falls in the 1930s. For more information on the National Register or other historic preservation programs, contact the State Historic Preservation Office at the Cultural Heritage Center, 900 Governors Drive, Pierre, SD 57501-2217; telephone 605-773-3458 or website history. sd.gov/Preservation. Sportsmen, Retailers, And Business Leaders Join Forces To Promote Hunting (SIOUX FALLS, SD) – With hunting seasons now open, most South Dakotans are expecting to see a lot of orange in all corners of the state. But, in many parts of the state, people will also be seeing a lot of green. As in the color of money. Hunting Works For South Dakota, a newly formed organization, plans on educating the public, policy makers and the media about the important relationship between hunting and the overall economy of South Dakota. “Without a doubt, hunting is a major driver of our state’s economy,” said Holly Glover, executive director of the Gregory Dallas Area Chamber of Commerce and a Hunting Works For South Dakota co-chair. “Hunter spending benefits locally-owned businesses like hardware stores, gas stations, restaurants, hotels and countless others across the state. A lot of people simply don’t realize the impact this spending has on our economy.” Hunting touches all aspects of South Dakota’s economy in all corners of the state, including all cities and towns like Aberdeen, Rapid City, Sioux Falls and Watertown as well as Kimball, Winner, Gregory and Wall. “South Dakota has over 270,000 hunters a year with a significant number coming from out of state to participate in our world-class hunting. At the Sioux Falls Convention and Visitors Bureau, we get it. That’s why we do everything we can to pull out the stops during the rooster rush,” said Teri Schmidt, executive director of the Sioux Falls Convention and Visitors Bureau and co-chair of Hunting Works For South Dakota. “We understand that a lot of hunters are staying and dining and spending money in Sioux Falls when they first arrive in our state. We want to make sure that hunter tourists feel welcome so that they keep returning and hopefully bring more hunters with them with each return visit.” Kevin Nyberg, owner of Nyberg’s Ace Hardware and co-chair of Hunting Works For South Dakota echoed that sentiment. “It’s no secret that hunting is a big deal for a lot of people in South Dakota. I personally see the strength of our hunting heritage every year,” said Nyberg. “There is something really great about seeing second and third generations coming into the store preparing to go out hunting together. There’s nothing more special than to hear years of memories created through family hunting traditions.” “Spending by hunters is significant in South Dakota,” said Katie Knutson, director of the Mitchell Convention and Visitors Bureau and a Hunting Works For South Dakota co-chair. “The truth is that hunters spend over $300 million a year on trips and $115 million a year on equipment here in South Dakota.” “All of this points to HURON, S.D. – The 2017 South Dakota State Fair saw increased numbers with 211,843 attending the five-day event. Attendance was up slightly from last year and the highest number on record since 1996, when the fair was seven days long. “I credit the rise to not only increased camping numbers and a solid grandstand lineup, but also the fact that we had a well-rounded fair that made South Dakotans want to come take in a day or two. Plus, our exhibitor numbers were strong,” commented Peggy Besch, South Dakota State Fair manager. “It’s exciting to see shoulder-to-shoulder crowds during the fair. We are proud of the fact that we had a strong fair and were able to post increases in various areas.” The South Dakota State Fair hosted 1,955 campers, resulting in an increase in camping revenue by 6.6 percent. Other increases include a 20 percent increase in grandstand tickets sold and a 25 percent increase in grandstand ticket revenue. Carnival revenue was up by 4.7 percent. Total revenue for the South Dakota State Fair was up by over $200,000. Youth participation at the South Dakota State Fair increased as 4-H static exhibits were up by 6.4 percent, 4-H livestock exhibits were up 2.8 percent and FFA entries were up 3.7 percent. The 2017 SD State Fair ran from Thursday, Aug. 31, through Monday, Sept. 4. Channel Seeds Preview night was Wednesday, Aug. 30. This year’s theme was “Seriously Twisted Fun.” The 2018 SD State Fair is scheduled for Thursday, Aug. 30 – Monday, Sept. 3. For more information on State Fair • Farm Filters • Hydraulic Hoses • Bearings & Seals events, contact the Fair office 1007 Broadway Ave at 800-529-0900, visit www. Yankton, SD sdstatefair.com or find them 605•665•4494 on Facebook or Twitter. Agriculture is a major contributor to South Dakota’s economy, generating $25.6 billion in annual economic activity and employing over 115,000 South Dakotans. The TREE TRIMMING, REMOVALS & TRANSPLANTING South Dakota Department TREES FOR SALE of Agriculture's mission is to EVERGREEN • SHADE • ORNAMENTAL promote, protect and preserve South Dakota agriculture for Yankton 605-260-1490 today and tomorrow. Visit the Hartington 402-254-6710 SDDA online at www.sdda. Serving Southeast SD & Northeast NE for 20 Years sd.gov or find us on Facebook, Kent & Kyle Hochstein • Licensed Arborists Twitter or Instagram. www.hartingtontree.com Let Our Family Business Keep Yours In The Go With: Cox Auto Hartington Tree LLC hunting as being good for families, businesses, and, quite frankly, it’s good for our state and local economy,” added Nyberg. “That’s evidenced by the fact that hunter spending surpasses $723 million a year, supports over 11,000 jobs in our state and $302 million in salaries and wages and generates $62 million in state and local taxes. That benefits everyone.” All told, the Congressional Sportsmen’s foundation puts the economic impact of those 270,000-plus hunters at $972 million in South Dakota. While the economic contributions of hunters are considerable, hunters’ dollars also pay for a large portion of conservation efforts. Thanks to the Pittman-Robertson Act, hunters pay an 11 percent excise tax on equipment sales that is used to conserve and restore habitat. “Hunters in South Dakota aren’t just supporting businesses, they are also supporting conservation,” said Jeff Boer, host of Wild Dakota Outdoor Television and one of the co-chairs of Hunting Works For South Dakota. “The money hunters spend on their licenses, stamps, and the taxes they pay on equipment is all earmarked for conservation. Our conservation model is based on hunters and the money they spend, without them we would not have the beautiful wild places we have today.” Hunting Works For South Dakota and its partners will be active in the state, attending events and educating the public and elected officials on why hunting and the shooting sports are so important to the local and state economy. “South Dakota is best known for our pheasant season, as well as some of the best upland, waterfowl and big game hunting in North America,” said Casey Weismantel executive director of the Aberdeen Convention and Visitors Bureau, and co-chair of Hunting Works For South Dakota. “In our area we welcome hunters and hunter dollars. We want to help tell the story of the larger economic impact that this sport has on the greater Aberdeen area and the state as a whole.” The newly formed Hunting Works For South Dakota partnership has over 50 partner organizations and will be adding dozens more in the weeks and months to come. The effort is supported by sporting organizations such as the National Shooting Sports Foundation. “We all benefit from a robust hunting industry,” said Karla Brozik, executive director of the Winner Chamber of Commerce and a co-chair of Hunting Works For South Dakota. “It’s a great way to see the outdoors, spend time with friends and family, and to support our local businesses.” Notice: Statement of Non Discrimination In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, gender identity (including gender expression), sexual orientation, disability, age, marital status, family/parental status, income derived from a public assistance program, political beliefs, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity, in any program or activity funded by USDA (not all bases apply to all programs). Remedies and complaint filing deadlines vary by program or incident. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g., Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.) should contact the responsible Agency or USDA’s TARGET Center at (202)720-2600 (voice or TTY) or contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800)877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English. To file a program discrimination complaint, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, AD-3027, found online at http://www.ascr.gove/complaint_filing_cust.html and at any USDA office or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866)632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by: (1) mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights 1400 Independence Ave, SW Washington, D.C., 20250-9410 (2) fax: (202)690-7442; or (3) email: email: program.intake@usda.gov USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer, and lender.
Weather

Fair 59.0 F
Click For More
Conditions:Fair
Temperature:59.0 F
Humidity:46
Wind:West at 16.1 MPH (14 KT)
Dewpoint:37.9 F (3.3 C)
Heat Index:
Windchill:56 F (13 C)


Shopper Issues
April 17, 2018
April 17, 2018
Published On
04-17-2018

April 10, 2018
April 10, 2018
Published On
04-10-2018

Spring Sports Preview 2018
Spring Sports Preview 2018
Published On
04-06-2018

April 3, 2018
April 3, 2018
Published On
04-03-2018