Logo

Bookmark and Share


4



4 Broadcaster Press January 30, 2018 www.broadcasteronline.com Home of Great Ideas since 1934 201 W Cherry St. • Vermillion, SD • Phone: 624-4429 Fax: 624-2696 • BroadcasterOnline.com Microbrewery Bill Introduced PIERRE, S.D. – Today, the Senate Commerce Committee introduced Senate Bill 169, Governor Daugaard’s bill to modernize South Dakota’s alcohol laws concerning microbreweries. “South Dakota’s statutes limit the ability of our homegrown craft breweries to grow and thrive,” said Governor Daugaard. “Whenever it is practical, our state should minimize government regulation and look to free enterprise to promote economic growth.” South Dakota’s current laws governing microbreweries are among the most onerous in the country. Current law limits microbrewery privileges to 5,000 barrels. Exceeding that limit takes away privileges vital to the success of small businesses and Senate Bill 169 will increase that to 30,000 barrels. The corresponding cap is 60,000 barrels in Montana, 50,000 barrels in Wyoming, and 25,000 barrels in North Dakota. Iowa imposes no barrel limit. Senate Bill 169 will also allow microbreweries to sell their products directly to retailers, such as restaurants and grocery stores. Current South Dakota law prohibits this, and also prevents a microbrewery from moving product between two of its own locations. Montana, Wyoming, North Dakota, Minnesota, and Iowa all allow microbreweries to sell directly to other retailers. The Pursuit Of Dreams By Rep. Kristi Noem The whole experience of being a first-time parent can be overwhelming. There’s unmatched joy, of course, but there are also so many questions. How are we going to provide for this baby? What kind of crib do we get? Cloth or disposable? What if something goes wrong? Boy or girl? What kind of person will they become? What kind of parents will we be? Are we ready for this? From the moment Bryon and I found out we were pregnant, we were asking these questions, we were planning, we were praying, and we were dreaming of our kids’ futures. This January, I introduced legislation that would allow parents to start investing in those dreams from the very beginning too. More specifically, my bill would let parents name their unborn children as beneficiaries of 529 accounts, which are tax-advantaged savings plans designed to help families save for future education costs. If enacted, this would mean unborn children would have a spot in our tax code, which they currently do not. It’s another step toward ensuring every child – born or yetto-be-born – is given the dignity they deserve. President Trump has been a good working partner in this goal. His appointment of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court, for instance, was a critical win for the pro-life cause. President Trump also signed legislation I backed empowering states to defund Planned Parenthood and put his name on legislation that bans taxpayerfunded abortion, for the time being. I’m working to push more legislation his way too. In October, the House passed the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act, which would prohibit abortion once a baby can feel pain (approximately 20 weeks). While I believe life begins at conception (and have backed legislation that would define life as such), I was pleased to get the House to move a step in the right direction. Unfortunately, the Senate has yet to act on the legislation. I also helped introduce the No Taxpayer Funding for Abortion Act, which prohibits taxpayer-funded abortions as well as taxpayer-funded subsidies for healthcare plans covering elective abortions. A 2016 Government Accountability Office study showed abortions were paid for with federal dollars through Obamacare exchanges, which we had previously been told would not be the case. According to the Susan B. Anthony List, “Under Obamacare, as many as 111,500 additional abortions per year could be heavily subsidized by taxpayers.” That is unacceptable, and the No Taxpayer Funding for Abortion Act would fix it. While the House has passed it, the Senate has not taken it up at this point. The House also passed legislation this January that requires healthcare professionals to provide care to babies who are born alive after a failed abortion attempt. Additionally, I’ve cosponsored legislation that would prohibit gruesome dismemberment abortions. I’m also working to drive the Heartbeat Protection Act forward, which would protect unborn children whose heartbeats can be detected. And while it’s not as widely covered as abortion is, I’ve been very supportive of pro-life efforts to prohibit physician-assisted suicide. These issues are important because they center around the foundation of a society – life. On January 19, I joined hundreds of thousands of people, including many South Dakotans, in marching for life. It was a powerful experience. Together, we marched for the unborn, for their future, and for their right to pursue their dreams. Improving Our Medicaid Program By Gov. Dennis Daugaard South Dakotans believe in self-reliance. The pioneers who settled this state over a century ago, as well as the natives who preceded them, understood the need for self-reliance. In fact, they knew no other way. Those who came to Dakota sought freedom and a fresh start. They understood, though, that freedom requires responsibility, because they could only survive by taking care of themselves. As a second key value, South Dakotans believe in hard work. It is simply a part of our culture. When we promote South Dakota as a good place to do business, we promote the work ethic of our people. Those who do business in South Dakota and elsewhere will attest to the fact that South Dakotans know how to work. There’s also a sense of pride that comes with having a job to do and being able to provide for your family. The Trump Administration recently indicated it is willing to consider state work requirements for Medicaid participants. The federal government just approved a work requirement as part of Kentucky’s Medicaid program, and I have asked the Department of Social Services to pursue a work requirement for able-bodied adult South Dakotans enrolled in Medicaid here. This would not apply to every South Dakotan on Medicaid. Our Medicaid program today covers roughly 82,000 Stories you missed this week because you’re not a Plain Talk subscriber Coverage of the first major winter storm to hit Vermillion in 2018 and the cleanup efforts that took place afterwards. A story about Joseph Ahuna, a Vermillion man who has been offering free ukulele lessons in recent years and is about to offer beginner and advanced classes at the Vermillion Public Library. News about a group of Vermillion High School students who traveled to Chicago to take part in the March for Life on Jan. 14. Illegally Dumped Snow Causing Problems PIERRE, S.D. - The South Dakota Department of Transportation reminds the public and commercial snow removal2.5” | Maximum Font Size: 30 to place or dump excess 3.5” x operators that it is illegal pt Have 403(b) questions? Let’s talk. Curt Robinson Financial Curt Robinson Advisor . Financial 23 Market Street Advisor Patrick M Higgins Financial Advisor 23 Market Street 605-624-2028 Vermillion, SD 57069 www.edwardjones.com 605-624-2028 www.edwardjones.com 7 W. Cherry Street Vermillion, SD 57069 605-658-0205 www.edwardjones.com Vermillion, SD 57069 Member SIPC And if you want to see: Important information about influenza and whether the bug is going around in Clay County. Full coverage of the outcomes of the USD Coyote men’s and Coyotes women’s basketball game against their chief rivals, the South Dakota State Jackrabbits. A report from the Legislative Cracker Barrel Meeting held Saturday, Jan. 27 in Vermillion City Hall. Coverage of the Jan. 29 meeting of the Vermillion School Board meeting. Pick up this Friday’s Plain Talk! Local news since 1884! Here for you yesterday, today and tomorrow. A GREAT TIME FOR A GREAT CAUSE! prizes • auctions dinner • fun 24th al Annu www.rmef.org 201 W. Cherry, Vermillion, SD 57069 605-624-2695 children; 23,000 aged, blind or disabled persons; 1,000 pregnant women; and 13,000 very low-income parents. The work requirement would apply only to very lowincome parents who aren’t already working or caring for a young child. This would place the work requirement on approximately 4,500 individuals in South Dakota. By July 1, South Dakota will submit a proposal to seek approval for the work requirement, starting with a twoyear pilot. If approved, we will begin with 1,300 Medicaid recipients who reside in Minnehaha and Pennington counties – where there is the greatest availability of employment and training resources. Pending approval, we will begin a voluntary program in these counties in July. The Department of Labor and Regulation will enroll participants automatically for individualized employment and training services to help them find jobs. For those who earn enough to transition off of Medicaid, we will provide assistance - such as child care subsidies - to ensure their long-term success. All work has dignity, and work is an important part of personal fulfillment. By making this adjustment to our Medicaid program, we will continue to help persons in need, while helping find jobs for those able to work, and also find that sense of pride and accomplishment which accompanies work. Attend a Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation Dinner and Benefit Auction where fun and fundraising combine for a memorable evening. DATE: Saturday, Feb. 3rd 2018 TIME: Doors open at 5:00 PM PLACE: Minervas, E. Hwy 50, Yankton TICKET INFORMATION: Call Dave Mingo at 605-661-0553 Proceeds benefit elk and other wildlife snow on highway right of way, which includes driving surfaces, shoulders and ditches. “The recent snowstorm across South Dakota has deposited a large amount of snow in some areas,” said Kristi Sandal, public information officer. “The space within the right of way needs to be reserved for future snow that may fall on the road. If the department’s plow operators do not have a place to put that snow, it severely hampers their ability to clear roadways.” Violation of the anti-dumping law is a Class 1 misdemeanor, with a penalty of up to one year in jail, $2,000 in fines, or both. It is the policy of the SDDOT to remove snow that has been illegally piled within the highway right of way that may be a safety hazard. In addition, violators will be billed for the costs of removing illegally dumped snow. “Piling snow in the state highway right of way can be very dangerous,” says Sandal. “Snow piles can restrict sight distance, as well as present an extreme hazard if a vehicle leaves the roadway. Snow piles that remain adjacent to the road may cause additional drifting and visibility problems posing more safety hazards to travelers, as well as additional expenses for manpower and equipment to remove the illegally dumped snow.” Property owners and access users are reminded it is their responsibility to remove snow from the ends of driveways and around their own mailboxes. The department asks landowners and commercial snow-removal operators to keep excess snow on private property or haul it to legal dumping sites. Romsdahl’s Repair & Remodel Carpentry, Decks, Windows & Doors, Refinishing, Drywall, & Ceramic Tile 19 Years in Business Free Estimates 605-670-2161
Weather

Fair 59.0 F
Click For More
Conditions:Fair
Temperature:59.0 F
Humidity:46
Wind:West at 16.1 MPH (14 KT)
Dewpoint:37.9 F (3.3 C)
Heat Index:
Windchill:56 F (13 C)


Shopper Issues
October 9, 2018
October 9, 2018
Published On
10-09-2018

October 2, 2018
October 2, 2018
Published On
10-02-2018

Clay County 4H
Clay County 4H
Published On
09-28-2018

September 25, 2018
September 25, 2018
Published On
09-25-2018