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Broadcaster Press 3 February 6, 2018 www.broadcasteronline.com Animal Care Consider Starting A Summer Food Service Program In Your Community Wednesday Webinars For Expert Advice PIERRE, S.D. - In an effort to fend off hunger, the South Dakota Department of Education’s office of Child and Adult Nutrition Services is seeking sponsors for a federallyfunded program that provides nutritious meals and snacks to children in low-income areas during the summer months. Community organizations, nonprofits, schools, tribal and local governments can apply to be sponsors if they operate in low-income areas, serve a group of mostly low-income children or operate a summer camp with a high proportion of low-income participants. Parks and recreation departments, city and county health departments, libraries and neighborhood service agencies can participate as sites or sponsors. “I commend those individuals and organizations who step forward to make summer feeding sites possible in their local communities,” said Julie McCord, program specialist with South Dakota’s Child and Adult Nutrition Services. “The Summer Food Service Program helps ensure that South Dakota students have access to healthy meals all summer long when they lack access to the National School Lunch Program.” When school is in session, over 61,000 South Dakota students receive free or reduced-price meals through the National School Lunch Program. The Summer Food Service Program is federally funded through the U.S. Department of Agriculture and administered by the South Dakota Department of Education. It provides meals to students when school is not in session. Children age 18 and younger may receive a meal free of charge at a participating site. In 2017, South Dakota Summer Food Service Program sponsors served 523,239 meals, which is an increase from the 477,796 meals served in 2016. Summer food program sites must be in the attendance area of a school where 50 percent or more of students are eligible for free or reduced-price meals, or within the boundary of a U.S. Census block where at least 50 percent of children are eligible for free and reduced-price meals when at school. A site meeting those criteria is open to all children under age 18 with special considerations for children from migrant households or those with a disability. It is important to note that while some areas may not qualify with school data, such areas may still be able to qualify using census data. To determine eligibility in your area, see http://www.fns.usda.gov/sfsp/mapping-tools-summer-mealprograms. Organizations interested in reviewing sponsor responsibilities can watch the Summer Food Service Program Overview on the South Dakota Department of Education’s Summer Food Service Program webpage. To learn more about serving as a sponsor or site, call Child and Adult Nutrition Services at 605-773-3413. For more information and to register for training, go to http://doe.sd.gov/cans/sfsp. aspx. The deadline to register for training is Thursday, Feb. 22. Sponsors are often looking for partners to help provide activities and educational programs to encourage continued student participation throughout the summer. School food authorities also have the option to utilize the Seamless Summer Option to provide meals in the summer. Information on that option can also be obtained from South Dakota’s Child and Adult Nutrition Services office. USDA Nondiscrimination Statement In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, religious creed, disability, age, political beliefs or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at 800-877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English. To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, (AD-3027) found online at http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call 866-632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by: (1) mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 (2) fax: 202-690-7442; or (3) email: program.intake@usda.gov. This institution is an equal opportunity provider. Funding Available For Trails PIERRE, S.D. – South Dakota State Parks Director Katie Ceroll announced today that applications are being accepted for grants from the Recreation Trails Program (RTP). The grants will be available for trail projects sponsored by municipalities, counties, state parks, federal land management agencies or tribal governments. “When it comes to promoting healthy communities, recreational trails are key,” Ceroll said. “As safe corridors for exercise and recreation, trails give families the opportunity to spend quality time together and enjoy the natural beauty of our state.” The Recreational Trails Program provides partial reimbursement for approved trail projects. Eligible projects include construction of new public trails, rehabilitation of existing public trails, development of trail-related facilities and educational programs that relate to recreational trails. The application deadline is Friday, April 27, 2018. RTP funds come to the state through the Federal Highway Administration and are apportioned to states by Congress to fund both motorized and non-motorized public recreation trail projects. The amount of funds available is based upon the number of recreational vehicles licensed in each state. Application packets are available online at the Game, Fish and Parks website. For more information, contact grants coordinator Randy Kittle at 605.773.5490 or randy. kittle@state.sd.us. 4-H Experience Helps SD Legislator Serve Effectively By Lura Roti For SDSU Extension Whether leading a calf around the showring or giving an illustrated talk, when Spencer Gosch competed in 4-H he knew where he stood. "No matter what that project was - it could have been a market steer, photography, banana bread or a talk on bicycle safety - when I competed in 4-H, I either received a purple ribbon or I didn't," explains the District 23 Representative. "Through 4-H, my father taught me that I was never so good I couldn't get better and never so bad I couldn't get worse." Gosch says involvement in 4-H instilled a drive to better himself and continuously work to improve. It's a mindset he carries into every aspect of his full life. Along with public service, the 34-year-old is a fourthgeneration farmer/rancher, an insurance agent, a sports broadcaster for the Dakota Radio Group and owns a traveling DJ business, Nighthawk Entertainment. He and his wife, Ashley, have three young children. Growing up, Gosch says 4-H was a family tradition for him and his four siblings. Showing cattle was their project of choice. "But, my mom always made us branch out and do other things, like illustrated talks," he says of the 4-H project area where members put public speaking skills into practice. "It was a welcoming challenge for me to get up and speak in front of people." Looking back on the experience, Gosch says as a South Dakota Legislator he puts what he learned through 4-H illustrated talks into action each time he speaks on the House floor. "When I open my mouth in the Legislature, I am speaking, potentially, in front of hundreds of thousands. And, what I say is going on the record," he says. "4-H taught me how to speak in a way where I get my point across without droning on." Gosch sees this same talent among today's 4-H members. "As a sports broadcaster, I can tell who has some sort of background in 4-H, or like programs, when I conduct interviews with these young individuals. When asked, I am shocked how many kids confirm that assumption." 4-H also expanded his circle of friends beyond the rural community of Selby. "When you are in 4-H, your world opens up. 4-H provides rural youth, like me, with so many opportunities to travel and meet kids from all over," he says. "Today, I have lifelong friends, who I met through 4-H, from towns that I now represent as a Legislator. Lifelong friends who returned home and are now trying to do the right thing for their community. It is an honor to represent these people today in Pierre." A responsibility he takes seriously. "Like I said, in 4-H I learned that I can always do more and it's our duty to help others." BROOKINGS, S.D. - SDSU Extension reminds livestock and companion animal owners to tune into the 2018 season of Animal Care Wednesday Webinar series. Airing at 11 a.m. (CST) on the first Wednesday of each month, this webinar series highlights livestock and companion animal experts from across the state and region. "Keeping animals healthy is always the first priority of every animal caregiver, young and old," explained Heidi Carroll, SDSU Extension Livestock Stewardship Associate. To receive reminders and log in information for Animal Care Wednesday Webinar series, send Carroll an e-mail. Common diseases to be aware of and watch for in show or exhibition animals was the focus of the Jan. 3, 2018 webinar hosted by Dr. Dustin Oedekoven, South Dakota State Veterinarian. The Feb. 7, 2018 webinar, led by Dr. Sheila Purdum, Professor-Poultry Nutrition at University of NebraskaLincoln, will focus on common poultry health issues in an era of few poultry veterinarians. All webinars can be accessed by visiting the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Animal Science website, click on the Extension tab and scroll down to the Animal Care Resources link. Celebrate Engineers Week & Inspire Wonder In Youth BROOKINGS, S.D. - Encourage your youth to explore and inspire wonder through activities during Engineers Week, February 18-24, 2018. "Take advantage of this week's focus on engineering and use it as an opportunity to inspire wonder in our youth," said Christine Wood, SDSU Extension 4-H Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM) Field Specialist. "Our world is ever- evolving as new technologies and processes are developed to resolve issues and simplify tasks." These new developments and inventions are often credited to engineers, but what is an engineer? "Answering this question is a great place to begin with younger children," Wood explained. By pure definition an engineer is 'the maker of an engine.' The word engine comes from the Latin word ingenium meaning 'clever invention.' Thus an engineer is the maker of a clever invention. "While there are numerous types of engineers, they all creatively apply what they know about mathematics, science, and technology to develop new ideas, processes, and products," she said. "Additionally, they utilize critical thinking, problem solving, communication, and teamwork in the process." While young children may not be able to wrap their minds around all of the scientific and technical knowledge needed to pursue a career as an engineer, Wood said it is never too early to introduce them to engineering concepts and practices. "Children have an innate sense of wonder making them natural engineers," Wood said. "As parents and educators, we can nurture this awe and curiosity to fuel learning through investigation and design. By providing youth opportunities to explore engineering, we enhance their creativity and boost their confidence." Engineer activities to boost creativity Through engineering activities, Wood said we have the opportunity to develop a variety of soft skills that are used in engineering as well as a variety of other fields. "Engineering activities foster problem solving, teamwork, and communication skills," Wood said. Wood lists the following websites for ideas: •Connect2Engineering •Design and Discovery •Design Squad Nation •Discover e •Engineering is Elementary •Engineer Your Life •TechXcite Romsdahl’s Repair & Remodel Carpentry, Decks, Windows & Doors, Refinishing, Drywall, & Ceramic Tile Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper 19 Years in Business St. Paul’s Episcopal Church Free Estimates 10 Linden Ave 605-670-2161 Tuesday, Feb. 13th • 5-7 p.m. Topping bar & all you can eat! Free-will offering Join us for Ash Wednesday Services February 14th at 12 Noon or 5:15 p.m. massage for health 216 West Main Street Vermillion, SD Give the gift of health. 10% off all Valentine’s Gift Cards Open Monday thru Friday Lois Hazen, LMT For appointments, call 624-6732 www.loismassages.com WELCOME Ribbon Cutting and Open House Wednesday, February 7th 106 E Main St 4:30-6pm Ribbon Cutting Ceremony: 5:30pm Weekly Meat SpecialS 1 $ 99 2 $ 69 1 $ 49 1 $ 79 Fresh 81% Lean Ground Beef.............. lb. Fresh Chuck Roast............................ lb. Fresh Boneless Chicken Breast....... lb. Fresh Family Pack Chops & Pork Steak............................ 2020 27th Street Sioux City, IA 712.258.5992 lb. www.laurencesmeat.com Valentine’s Day Wednesday, February 14th Boxed Candies & Other Great Gifts for your Sweetie 5 W. Cherry St., Vermillion • 605-624-4444 • M-F 8-9, Sat 8-5:30
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