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March 27, 2018 www.broadcasteronline.com 8 Broadcaster Press Feed at Night, Calve During the Day BROOKINGS, S.D. - Does feeding time influence the time of calving? To answer this question, SDSU Extension Cow/Calf Field Specialists Adele Harty and Taylor Grussing look to research data. "Yes, feeding affects time of calving," Harty said. "Feeding cows later in the day and evening will increase the number of calves born during daylight hours, when it is easier for livestock producers to watch them more closely." Gus Konefal, a rancher from Manitoba, Canada first developed this feeding method after he discovered 80 percent of his cows calved between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. when they were fed later in the day. Konefal's method included a twice a day feeding, with first feeding between 11 a.m. and noon and second feeding between 9:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Supporting Research Similar research was conducted at Iowa State University. "This research used the Konefal feeding system, but only feeding one time per day at 4 p.m., starting two weeks prior to the expected start of calving," Grussing said. The result? Eighty-two percent cows calved between 6 a.m. and 10 p.m. with 91 percent of the calves born before 11 p.m. "Only 9 percent of calves were born outside the window when traditional calf checks are performed," Harty said. When heifers were separated from the data set and analyzed, 90 percent calved in this same time frame. A survey collected from 15 beef producers in Iowa and Missouri also reported that when they fed once daily between, 5 p.m. and 10 p.m., the result was 85 percent of cows calving between 5 a.m. and midnight. Compare this data to cows from herds not on the Konefel feeding system. That data showed an equal distribution of cows calving during the night as during the day, a 50/50 split. Researchers at USDA-ARS at Miles City, Montana completed at three-year study evaluating differences in feeding time on calving time. "The numbers were not as dramatic as Konefel and Iowa State data," Grussing said. "However, there was a consistent 10 to 20 percent decrease in the number of cows calving between 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. in the late fed cows compared to the early fed cows." Management Considerations If you're a cattle producer who would like to see more calves born during daylight hours, below are some Noem: Supporting Moms, Strengthening Families By Rep. Kristi Noem South Dakota has the nation’s highest rate of working moms with 84 percent being employed outside the home. For many families, both parents working is a financial necessity – one that comes with significant child care costs attached. In fact, by some estimates, child care in South Dakota costs about 28 percent of the average household income, or about $14,700 per year. Many of these families qualify for the Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit, which helps defray some child care expenses. During tax reform, however, some in Congress tried to eliminate the benefit. I had to fight hard to maintain the credit, but in the end, we were successful. Additionally, the Child Tax Credit was doubled to $2,000 per child, a win I worked closely with Ivanka Trump to achieve. These credits can make a real difference in people’s lives. A few weeks ago, I spoke with a single mom who is getting another $80 every pay check because of tax reform. For her, that meant she had more breathing room and greater financial security. For her son, it meant a new pair of basketball shoes. I’ve heard similar reports from others. Let’s say you’re a family of four making around $85,000 a year. Because of tax reform, you’ll be keeping an additional $2,400 in your pocket every year. That’s a new washing machine, a nice family vacation, or a good chunk of change for the kids’ college funds. Of course, this financial peace of mind helps mitigate only one of the challenges working families face. Flexibility is another issue I’ve heard a lot about. For years, I’ve been working to get the Working Families Flexibility Act signed into law to help make balancing the demands of family, personal responsibilities, and the workforce a little easier. This bill would give employees the opportunity to choose between taking overtime pay or receiving more paid time off. I’ve led the House in passing this bill multiple times, the most recent being in 2017, but the Senate has yet to consider the bill. Additionally, in March of this year, I introduced legislation to help give expectant mothers additional flexibility, when needed. In the early 2000’s, Peggy Young was working for UPS. She became pregnant and was instructed not to lift anything over 20 pounds. She requested lightduty work, but was told “No,” even though accommodations were made for non-pregnant workers that had similar health-related restrictions. She couldn’t return to her previous role either, as it was a liability. As a result, Peggy had to go on unpaid leave and lost her medical coverage. She filed a lawsuit against UPS, which has since changed its policy, but the court’s decision left a lot of questions. My bill works to clarify the law. It says a pregnant worker should be treated the same as a non-pregnant worker who may have a temporary disability and is therefore unable to perform certain duties. This bill takes a balanced approach, protecting mothers without imposing duplicative burdens on their employers. I firmly believe our nation would be a whole lot stronger, if families were a whole lot stronger. Supporting working parents is an important step in achieving that. When we make these investments, we strengthen families and put the next generation on a trajectory toward success. points to consider when implementing the Konefal calving method. 1. Research indicated for this method to be most effective, evening feedings should be implemented one month prior to the scheduled start of calving. If feeding times are changed closer to calving, this will result in a more calves born during the day than morning feeding. 2. Iowa State University data advises staying as close to the same feeding schedule and feed amount as possible each day. Deviating more than 15 minutes, or providing too much feed, will yield less desirable results. 3. Maintain regular night checks. Konefal calving may simply mean that there will be less work to be done between checks due to fewer calves born during the night. 4. The Konefal calving method works best in a drylot situation where all feed is provided. Desired effect in a grazing situation may not be seen unless supplemental hay or timing of grazing can be regulated. 5. Weather can play a role in effectiveness. Before or during storms, cattle may not come to the bunk to eat and may be more likely to calve at night. 6. Additional research indicates that a first calf heifer who calves during the day will tend to calve during the day the remainder of her productive years. Turn Yo ur Clutter i nto Cash! Advertise your Garage Sale to thousands of readers! 624-4429 SD Cancer Coalition Recognizes Efforts To Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening PIERRE, S.D. – A South Dakota physician and a health care facility are being recognized for their efforts to increase colorectal cancer screening as part of a national effort to screen 80 percent of the eligible population by 2018. The South Dakota Cancer Coalition Colorectal Cancer Task Force has honored Dr. Daniel Heinemann, MD, a vice president and medical officer for Sanford Health Network, and Falls Community Health in Sioux Falls for increasing screening rates among their eligible patients. Dr. Heinemann was awarded the 80 percent by 2018 Champion of the Year Award and Falls Community Health received the 80 percent by 2018 Organization of the Year Award. “Staff at Falls Community Health and Dr. Heinemann should be applauded for their hard work and dedication to increase colorectal cancer screening. Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in South stream rehabilitation efforts. Dakota,” said Karen Cudmore, cancer programs director “Custer State Park is truly a gem for the Department of Health. “We know that colorectal for the entire state of South Dakota,” cancer screening tests can save lives, but the reality is said Walter Panzirer, a trustee for too many adults aren’t following the recommendation for the Helmsley Charitable Trust. “The regular screening beginning at age 50.” Helmsley Charitable Trust has alAccording to the 2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveilready made significant investments lance Survey, just 65.8 percent of South Dakota adults in the park, providing funding for aged 50 to 75 were up to date with colorectal cancer the theater in the visitor center and screening. The state and several partners are part of the remodel of the Peter Norbeck a national effort working toward the goal of increasing Outdoor Education Center. We are colorectal cancer screening rates to 80 percent by 2018. pleased to assist with strategic efMarch is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Men forts to mitigate the effects of the and women age 50 to 75 should talk to their healthdevastating fire and ensure visionary care provider about getting screened for colorectal steps are taken to secure the park cancer. For more information about screening, go to for future generations.” GetScreened.SD.gov. Helmsley Charitable Trust Grants $1.8 Million to Support Custer State Park Fire Rehabilitation Project Custer State Park, S.D. – The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust has awarded a $1.8 million grant to Custer State Park to aid rehabilitation efforts following last December’s Legion Lake Fire. The fire burned nearly 50 percent of Custer State Park’s 71,000 acres and is the third largest fire in Black Hills recorded history. “The Legion Lake Fire took us all by surprise and could have been much, much worse, if not for the hard work and heroic efforts of our firefighters,” said Gov. Dennis Daugaard. “It was South Dakota at its best; people from across the state and region pulled together in a time of need. And that hard work continues through rehabilitation efforts with help from The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust. By peak season, park staff will have the park in pristine condition, ready to give visitors the high-quality experience they have provided for decades.” The grant funds will be put to immediate use extending over a three-year period to support aerial mapping, tree thinning, reseeding, weed control, erosion control and CO CO CANADAY Sale 40th Annual “Pride in Performance” p.m. F-1 to purebreds all Percentages Simmental, SimAngus, Angus 22 5 SONS SELL! He is an industry leader! 8 Bred Heifers Let Our Family Business Keep Yours In The Go With: Cox Auto 1007 Broadway Ave Yankton, SD OTHER SIRES KCF Bennett Absolute AAA16430795 GCC-7 Absolute Brilliance Bruiser Complement Yellowstone contact: David Canaday Kathleen Canaday 89287 543 Ave. Bloomfield, NE 68718 54289 893 Rd. Bloomfield, NE 68718 Phone: 402-373-4482 Curt Robinson Financial Advisor Patrick M Higgins Financial Advisor 23 Market Street Vermillion, SD 57069 605-624-2028 www.edwardjones.com 7 W. Cherry Street Vermillion, SD 57069 605-658-0205 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
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