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2 Broadcaster Press April 10, 2018 www.broadcasteronline.com Dave Says By Daris Howard Getting Rid Of The Car Dear Dave, How do you sell a vehicle with a lien amount that’s higher than the actual value of the car? Michael Dear Michael, First, you need to find a way to cover the difference between the amount of the lien and what you can get for the car. Let’s say the car is worth $12,000, and you owe $15,000. That would leave you $3,000 short. The bank holds the title, so unless you give them the payoff amount of Dave $15,000 you’re not getting the title. The easiest and simplest way would be if someone buys the car for $12,000, and you had $3,000 on hand to make up the difference. If you don’t have the money to make up the difference, you could go to a local bank or credit union and borrow the remaining $3,000. I really hate debt, but being $3,000 in the hole is a lot better than being $15,000 in the hole. Then, you could turn around and quickly pay back the $3,000 you borrowed. You’d give the total amount owed to the bank, they would give you the title, and you would sign it over to the new owner. Hope this helps! — Dave RAMSEY Stop Spending Completely? Dear Dave, My mom and dad are following your advice, and they are working hard to get out of debt. I was wondering, is it okay to buy things while you’re paying off the debt you already have? Leslie Dear Leslie, I’m glad you’re paying attention to the finances around your house. Of course, there are some things you must have. We call these “necessities.” Most things are not necessities, though. If your air conditioning breaks down, or you have car repairs, those are things you must spend money on to fix. Things like new furniture, vacations, and eating at restaurants are not necessities. They’re things you might want, but they’re not necessary — especially when you’re trying to pay off debt. I always recommend people take a hard look at their priorities, and remember there’s a difference between wanting something and needing something to survive. It can be hard, and it may mean everyone has to go without a few things they want for a while. But if your parents are serious about getting out of debt, they’ll do it. And it really won’t take all that long. Great question, Leslie! — Dave * Dave Ramsey is America’s trusted voice on money and business, and CEO of Ramsey Solutions. He has authored seven bestselling books, including The Total Money Makeover. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 12 million listeners each week on 575 radio stations and multiple digital platforms. Follow Dave on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com. Sign Up For 4-H Camp Today • Listen and communicate effectively; • Accept responsibility in a community-living setting; and • Apply independent life-skills away from home "These skills that the youth learn or improve on do not stop when they leave camp; rather, youth can transfer these abilities to any group, organization, or team that they are involved with," Jaeger said. Counselor Benefits Campers are not the only youth who benefit from attending camp, Jaeger said feedback from older 4-H members who serve as camp counselors also gain a lot from the Scan our QR code with your smart phone and discover the Broadcaster Online! Stories you missed this week because you’re not a Plain Talk subscriber Breaking news about the hiring of a new men’s basketball coach at the University of South Dakota. A report of record cold temperatures that struck the Vermillion area in early April. A feature highlighting a retail business that’s been a fixture in downtown Vermillion for decades. The story includes a chat with Gloria Christopherson, who opened Nook ‘n Cranny 44 years ago, and is closing the store and retiring. And if you want to see: Coverage of the press conference in which Todd Lee, a University of South Dakota alum, was formally introduced to USD Coyote fans as the new men’s basketball coach. A report of why scores of children, from infants to teenagers, gathered at Sanford Vermillion hospital to help Dr. Mary Jo Olson celebrate a milestone in her career as a family practice physician at Sanford Vermillion hospital. Learn more about that milestone in next week’s edition. Complete coverage of the annual Vermillion Chamber and Development Company banquet, held Thursday, April 5 in the Sanford Coyote Sports Center. Read about how the event celebrated the accomplishments in the Vermillion community in the past year and honored the 20-year career of James Abbott as president of the University of South Dakota. He will be retiring in June. 201 W. Cherry, Vermillion, SD 57069 605-624-2695 Linder Salvage Do you have unwanted appliances? My daughter asked me if I would judge at a debate tournament. “I’ve never even been to a debate tournament,” I replied. “It’s okay,” she said. “They’ll train you. Besides, the most important part of judging is to give the students information about what you feel they can do better. If you just give them points and don’t say why you scored them the way you did, it will mean nothing.” She said every student was asked to provide a judge for one of the tournaments, and I could choose which one I went to. I looked at the tournament schedule and determined one that would work for me. On the appointed day, I went to the designated high school. All of the judges met in one room, and we were given some training. By the time I received my first assignment, I still felt totally unprepared. For my first judging round, the students helped me understand what was supposed to happen. I found both teams to be quite equal, but I also found little suggestions that I could share with them to help them know what they could do to improve. I wrote quite a lot of notes on their papers both during and after the debate. I judged a second round with similar results. I found I enjoyed it more than I thought I would. Eventually, I had a break and went to the judges’ lounge. The debate team parents of that school provided some taco salads for the judges. I started to fill a plate, and the lady that was serving asked how the judging was going. “This is my first time,” I said. “I think it’s going okay, but I have nothing to compare against.” “Well, I’ve judged a lot of these,” she said, “and I’ve seen worse, but not too much worse.” Since I was the last person in line, she quit serving and filled a plate of food for herself. She came over to the table I was at, and three other ladies joined us as well. The first lady continued to talk about how bad the debaters were. “In the judging I have done,” she said, “I have seldom seen such poor performances.” “Well,” another lady said, “you’ve got to realize that for some of these kids, it’s the first time they have ever tried this.” No matter how much others tried to turn the conversation to a positive tone, the first lady kept sharing her negative comments. Suddenly, I bit into something that was really chewy. I tried to chew my way through it, but it didn’t get any smaller, and it hooked on my teeth. Finally, I spit it onto my fork and set it on the plate. I tried to do it inconspicuously, but the lady next to me noticed. “What is that?” she asked. I picked it up and carefully analyzed it. “I think it’s a rubber band,” I said. “One of the bigger kind that someone wears on their braces.” Another lady at the table just about gagged. She swallowed a few times to keep her food down, and then set her fork down and pushed her food away. The lady who had been so negative started to apologize. “Oh, I’m so sorry. I have no idea how that got in there.” “It’s no big deal,” I said, and I continued eating. “No big deal!” the lady who almost lost her meal said. “You found a rubber band like that in your food, and you say it’s no big deal? And how can you continue eating?” Looking right at the lady who had been complaining about the debate students, I laughed and said, “I’m a scoutmaster. I’ve seen worse.” The lady smiled an embarrassed smile and never said another word of complaint. Now Is The Time To Sign Up For A South Dakota HuntSAFE Class Pierre, S.D. – South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks (GFP) is currently taking registration for HuntSAFE classes. Classes are held statewide throughout the year. Registration for most classes is available online at gfp.sd.gov/hunter-education. Walk-ins are accepted if space is available, but pre-registration is recommended and required for most classes. "Course availability is limited as hunting seasons draw closer, so signing up now is your best bet of getting into a class," says South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks HuntSAFE coordinator, Patrick Klotzbach. An independent study HuntSAFE class is also available. “The independent study course allows students to complete the coursework online, at their own pace, and then attend a 4-6 hour field day,” says, Klotzbach. “Not all cities offer this option, but those that do are listed on our website.” Students interested in either the traditional classroom or independent study format must register online at gfp.sd.gov/ hunter-education. Those wanting to take the independent study option must register for their field day and then complete the online course offered at hunter-ed.com/southdakota/. Students must take the course and print off their field day qualifier certificate and bring it to the field day. The traditional classroom course is free, and the independent study HuntSAFE course is $15. HuntSAFE class is designed for persons age 12 through 15. If a student's twelfth birthday falls on or between Sept. 1 and Dec. 31, he/she may be issued a card and is eligible to obtain a license and hunt beginning Sept. 1 of that year. Adults are welcome and invited to attend with their student or take the course on their own, as many states require certification for adults as well. For more information on HuntSAFE in South Dakota, visit gfp.sd.gov/hunter-education or call 605.223.7700. VERMILLION AREA ARTS COUNCIL PRESENTS... Call Billy (402)692-3333 or (712)635-2575 2018 Messy Hands Summer Arts Camp Kids Camp (ages 5 - 11) Refrigerators, freezers, stoves, washers and dryers, cars, trucks & all types of scrap metals Week 1: Monday, July 9 - Friday, July 13 Week 2: Monday, July 16 - Friday, July 20 Teen Camp (ages 12 - 18) 1 Week: Monday, July 24 - Friday, July 28 APRIL 27-29, 2018 gain Buy 300+ Miles 30+ Towns 200+ Vendors way Here for you yesterday, today and tomorrow. RAPID CITY, S.D. - April marks the nation's "Month of the Military Child," a time to honor military youth in communities who have been impacted by deployments, as well as the unique opportunities and challenges that all military children face. The South Dakota National Guard invites everyone to join in and be part of "Purple Up! For Military Kids Day," being held April 13. South Dakota schools, communities, businesses and organizations are being encouraged to wear purple on that date as a tangible way to show their support and thank all military children for their strength and sacrifices. "This is a perfect time to celebrate military children and to recognize their character, strength and resilience," said Taryn Broomfield, SDNG Child and Youth Program lead coordinator. "Our military youth are impacted daily, whether their service member is home, deployed, at drill, or away attending training or school." There are more than 7,100 military children in South Dakota with parents or guardians who serve in the National Guard, Reserves and active duty. Of these children and youth, over 3,900 are affiliated with the SDNG. Gov. Dennis Daugaard demonstrated his support of military kids by signing a proclamation announcing April 2018 as the Month of the Military Child. Established by Casper Weinberger in 1986, the Month of the Military Child recognizes the important role military children play in our communities. We pause each year to honor the millions of military children for their contributions to their families. "Military kids are an integral part of our families and communities, and they serve too," said Broomfield. "Please celebrate the military children in your life and thank them." The Pick up this Friday’s Plain Talk! Local news since 1884! April Is Month Of The Military Child rip! BE SMART. experience: • Leadership; • Responsible citizenship; • Contribution; and • Teamwork "The skills learned as a camp counselor make teens a more qualified job applicant, a better team member, and a more confident leaders," Jaeger said. Sign up for 4-H camp today 4-H camps are available for youth 8 to 18. To register for camp, visit the iGrow Events page and look under the 4-H & Youth event category on the left hand side if the screen. Registration deadlines vary. Bar BROOKINGS, S.D. - SDSU Extension encourages South Dakota families to consider South Dakota 4-H summer camp options for their youth. "Camp is a fun, safe way for South Dakota's youth to explore new topics and activities in an experiential manner," Katherine Jaeger, SDSU Extension Youth Outdoor Education Field Specialist. In addition to fun, Jaeger said based on feedback from campers and their families, those who attend 4-H camp can benefit from the following: • Appreciate differences amongst people; I’ve Seen Worse Ult ED imate Road T ffering NEW & US O LARGE & SMALL one! call 402.893.2880 ry Something for Eveor email fullboremfg@frontiernet.net or email available locally! Guidebooks wwwbargainbuyway.com Info & Register on line at: Vermillionareaartscouncil.com Members Early Bird Reduced Pricing extended through April 15 Limited spacing so sign up now and be assured the space Use the Register on line or mail to VAAC PO Box 484 Vermillion, 57069 A limited number of Scholarships are available, must apply by May 15th For more information email vermillionareaartscouncil@gmail.com
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