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Broadcaster Press 5 May 29, 2018 www.broadcasteronline.com Michelle Wheatley Selected As Summer Season Kicks Off With Warmer Weather Superintendent Of Jewel Cave National Monument Omaha — National Park Service (NPS) Midwest Regional Director Cam Sholly announced the selection of Michelle Wheatley as superintendent of Jewel Cave National Monument, South Dakota. An18-year veteran of the NPS, Wheatley is currently superintendent of Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument. She assumes her new role on July 8, 2018. “Michelle has an extensive background in managing geologic andhistoric resources,” said Sholly. “She has proven herself to be an accomplished leader intently focused on helping the American people find deeper meaning and connections with their national parks. Michelleis sure to add tremendous value as superintendent of Jewel Cave.” “It is truly an honor to be selected as the superintendent of Jewel Cave National Monument,”Wheatley said about her new assignment. “I look forward to joining staff, volunteers, partners, and local communities in working together to protect the incredible resources Jewel Cave has to offer.” For the past five years, Wheatley has served as superintendent of Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument in Colorado. Under herleadership, the park developed an asset management program and addressed many complex deferred maintenance projects. She focused on strengthening the park’s public outreach and relationships with the community. Wheatley served as acting superintendent at Colorado National Monument and as acting superintendent at Grant Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site prior to becoming superintendent at Florissant Fossil Beds. She has also worked in Yellowstone and Rocky Mountain National Parks in a variety of visitor services positions. Wheatley is a graduate of Colorado State University, where she earned a Bachelor of Science degree in recreation and business administration. She later received a Graduate Certificate in natural resources and environments from Colorado State University, Division of Continuing Education. An avid hiker and skier, Wheatley is looking forward to exploring and learning more about the natural resources in the park and the Black Hills area along with her husband, Hal, and their two Australian Shepherds, Millie and Bobby. Sustained Effort Needed To Reduce Infant Mortality PIERRE, S.D. – South Dakota’s infant mortality rate increased in 2017, according to new data released today by the Department of Health. There were 12,128 births in 2017 and 94 infant deaths for a rate of 7.8 deaths per 1,000 live births. The state reported its lowest ever American Indian infant mortality rate of 8.6 deaths per 1,000 live births. The white infant mortality rate was 7 deaths per 1,000 live births. In 2016, South Dakota reported a rate of 4.8 deaths per 1,000 live births. Although the state’s infant mortality rate increased in 2017, the average infant mortality rate for the five-year period from 2013 to 2017 is the lowest ever recorded at 6.5 deaths per 1,000 live births. “Infant mortality is a complex and multi-faceted issue, and the latest data demonstrates that sustained effort is needed to ensure more South Dakota babies celebrate their first birthday,” said First Lady Linda Daugaard, who chaired the 2011 Governor’s Task Force on Infant Mortality. “We must continue to promote safe sleep guidelines for infants, help pregnant women stop smoking and encourage early prenatal care.” South Dakota data shows babies are twice as likely to die before their first birthday if their mothers smoke during pregnancy. In 2017, 12.6 percent of pregnant women smoked while pregnant, down from 19.4 percent in 2007. The data also shows 72.2 percent of pregnant women in South Dakota received prenatal care in the first trimester. “Infant mortality is considered a gold standard for measuring the health of a population,” said Kim Malsam-Rysdon, Secretary of Health. “The Department of Health, in cooperation with partners, is committed to offering statewide services and providing community support to improve the health of all South Dakotans.” The First Lady noted the state’s Cribs for Kids program has distributed 9,759 safe sleep kits to families in need since its launch in 2012. The kits include a Pack ‘N Play crib, sheet, infant sleep sack, pacifier and safe sleep educational materials. Learn more about healthy pregnancies and safe sleep guidelines at ForBabySakeSD.com. BROOKINGS, S.D. After a near-record cold April, May 2018 is off to a warmer than average start across much of South Dakota. "It appears as if this trend will continue into June, as the dive into summer continues," said Laura Edwards, SDSU Extension State Climatologist. In fact, temperatures across the state were above average for the first 16 days of the month. "Most locations were two to five degrees warmer than usual for this time of year. A handful of locations in the Black Hills, south central and northeast have been more than five degrees above average so far," she said. The National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Outlook for June 2018, released May 17, leans towards warmer than average as well. "Current forecast projections show very good chances that the end of May and early June will be warmer than typical for this time of year in the Northern Plains," Edwards said. Precipitation Rainfall across South Dakota, as of May 17 has been variable, with the southeast portion of the state experiencing especially wet conditions, which brought many rivers to flood stage in early May. "The eastern rivers have receded now that all the snowmelt has runoff, but water is still high after some recent rain events," Edwards said. There have also been some local rain events in west central and northwestern counties, but the total for the last two weeks is only about an inch to 1.5 inches. The southwest and northeast continue to be the driest areas of the state in the last one to two months. "A look ahead into June's climate outlook does not provide much information for precipitation. The latest map shows equal chances of drier, wetter and near average moisture for the month ahead," she said, and explained that this is not unusual for the Northern Plains. "It is often difficult to predict spring and summer season storms. This is good news, and bad news, for those who are dry in the north, but also those that are too wet in the south and want to make some more progress in planting, fertilizer and early pesticide application." The U.S. Drought Monitor map, released May 17, shows that a new area of moderate drought was introduced in northeastern South Dakota, along the North Dakota border. "This area has been much drier than average for the last 30 to 60 days. Soil moisture is also dry for this time of year," Edwards said. "This has allowed spring wheat, corn and soybean planting to move ahead rapidly, but continued rainfall will be crucial for the rest of the spring season." In the west, despite some recent precipitation, Edwards explained that it has not yet been sufficient to bring the area completely out of drought. "Moderate drought remains over a large area of western South Dakota," she said. "Stock ponds filled with early spring runoff, but grasses and pastures will need more time to recover from the last one to two years of drought. This area has overall been slightly drier than average since April 1, which is a critical moisture period for cool season grasses." Wildfire Awareness Month Coloring Contest Winners Announced RAPID CITY, S.D. – The South Dakota Department of Agriculture Wildland Fire division announced the winners of their Wildfire Awareness Month Coloring Contest. Ian Cammack of Enning won the 3-7 age group and Brooklynn Baird of Whitewood won the 8-12 age group. Each will be awarded a plush Smokey Bear toy. The contest theme this year was, “One Less Spark, One Less Wildfire” which encourages members of the community to learn about the danger of embers during a wildfire and what they can do to reduce the risk. South Dakota Wildfire Awareness Month is planned by interagency cooperation and was created to promote wildfire awareness, safety, and prevention through public events held throughout South Dakota to remind citizens of the dangers of wildland fire and the simple steps that should be followed to prepare for and prevent them. This year South Dakota has joined a multi-state proc- lamation with eight other states in promoting Wildfire Awareness during the month of May 2017. To learn more about South Dakota Wildland Fire Awareness Month and to see other events, please visit our website: sdwildfireawareness.com. Follow South Dakota Wildland Fire on Twitter @SDWildlandFire and on Facebook by searching SD Wildland Fire. Hartington Tree LLC TREE TRIMMING, REMOVALS & TRANSPLANTING TREES FOR SALE EVERGREEN • SHADE • ORNAMENTAL Yankton 605-260-1490 Easy Sudoku Hartington 402-254-6710Puzzles by KrazyDad Book 65 Serving Southeast SD & Northeast NE for 20 Years Kent & Kyle Hochstein • Licensed Arborists Sudoku #6 www.hartingtontree.com Sudoku #5 6 5 7 9 4 7 2 9 5 1 3 2 7 8 8 6 9 2 4 8 2 7 3 8 7 9 1 6 5 4 6 8 5 2 9 3 9 2 5 6 2 6 7 “The Line To Power” 8 3 7 5 Design/Build • Fiber Cabling • Commercial • Residential Service Calls1Boom Truck with Auger • 2 • 6 3 2 9 Trenching Serving the 5 6 Book7 Answers 3 1-800-560-2518 2 6 5 9 1 4 65: Beresford and 1221 Cornell St., Vermillion, SD • 605-624-5642 Sudoku #1 Sudoku 6 #2 8 1 Vermillion Areas 6 201 5NW 13th2 Ste. 3, Beresford,6SD • 800-560-2518 3 St., 3 9 7 4 5 3 4 8 5 6 7 1 9 9 8 1 7 2 3 9 1 5 8 243 8 8 53 4 6 2 9 6 5 9 3 2 7 TODD’S ELECTRIC SERVICE Challenging Sudoku Puzzles by KrazyDad 8 2 1 bpp b 4 4 © 2008 KrazyDad.com For Sale 2 9 3 4 7 3 9 1 2 5 Possibilities for the Property are Endless... building was originally a welding repair shop then converted to a restaurant and bar. Many opportunities for this building and location. 8 7 1 7 Property Features • 3540 Square Feet 8 2 6 9 • Metal Building Built in 1991 3 7 8 • Property has 3-Phase Electricity 9 4 • All Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment • Large Lot with Highway 12 Access 8 9 6 2 7 1 • East Edge of Newcastle 6 5 7 Sale Information - June 11, 2018 at 9 A.M. No warranty or representation, express or implied, is made as to the accuracy of the information contained herein, and the same is submitted subject to errors, omissions, change of price, rental or other conditions, prior sale, lease or financing, or withdrawal without notice, and of any special listing conditions imposed by our principals no warranties or representations are made as to the condition of the property or any hazards contained therein are to be implied. B 7 1 1 3 8 roadcaster Broadcaster Press Press 9 1 bp Broadcaster2 1 8 Press3 5 4 6 8 7 8 3 7 9 6 1 3 6 2 2 1 4 9 8 5 Sudoku #4 4 9 8 2 6 7 1 3 3 5 2 6 5 1 9 7 2 8 6 5 7 4 3 1 1 3 4 9 8 6 7 4 9 2 5 8 9 3 2 4 5 1 8 9 4 5 6 7 3 8 1 8 4 4 7 2 6 3 9 5 9 3 2 8 6 7 8 6 9 7 2 5 5 3 1 6 1 4 4 9 1 7 25 6 7 3 8 2 Sudoku #5 7 Sudoku 1 #6 5 6 1 2 7 4 3 8 5 1 2 8 3 7 9 1 6 7 21 9 3 2 3 7 5 18 7 4 8 9 5 1 2 3 9 8 3 7 1 8 3 7 3 6 2 4 9 2 5 466 5 7 8 7 4 6 1 1 9 4 7 3 8 6 9 2 5 4 9 3 12 1 9 5 5 3 4 8 1 7 6 © 2008 KrazyDad.com The following described property will be sold at public action to the highest bidder at the north door of the Dixon County Courthouse in Ponca, Dixon County, Nebraska, on June 11, 2018, at 9:00 A.M. Lots 5 and 6, Kneifl’s Addition to Newcastle, Dixon County, Nebraska The successful bidder shall submit payment of the winning bid in full on the day and time of the sale, except this requirement is waived when the highest bidder is the Beneficiary. All taxes and fees are the responsibility of the successful purchaser. For inquiries, contact the Bank of Hartington at (402)254-3994 5 6 2 5 bp Broadcaster 7 9 8 Press 1 Sudoku #3 1 4 2 6 5 9 6 5 8 1 8 7 3 2 4 5 2 6 Since 1934 4 7 7 8 1 3 9 4 3 9 5 8 6 5 7 1 2 2 9 4 7 3 3 1 8 9 6 Since 1934 8 9 4 © 1 KrazyDad.com 3 1 8 2 7 5 9 6 4 4 20088 7 3 2 5 9 6 9 4 Since 1934 3 1 7 5 2 6 8 6 2 3 8 9 5 1 4 7 7 5 9 1 4 6 2 3 8 7 5 2 9 6 4 3 8 1 2 7 9 5 8 3 4 1 6 1 6 2 3 7 9 8 5 4 Fill the puzzle so that every row, every column, 2 5 every 1 9 and 8 6 6 8 4 7 1 9 5 2 3 3 4 7 section5contain2the numbers 1-9 without 8 9 5 6 a number. 2 repeating 1 4 3 7 1 3 6 4 #8 8 9 7 Sudoku Since 1934 Sudoku #7 7 2 5 9 5 8 9 2 4 6 8 6 9 2 7 1 6 7 4 1 1 3 5 3 9 6 8 6 4 5 7 5 9 4 2 9 5 3 2 8 1 3 5 8 3 2 4 © 2008 KrazyDad.com 7 6 3 9 2 ch BOOK465 #8 8 1 4 2 9 1 8 5 7 6 8 3 4 6 4 2 7 1 4 6 7 6 3 9 8 5 4 easy 6 1 5 2 3 7 9 Last Tuesday’s Sudoku Solution #7 9 8 6 5 2 4 7 9 4 7 2 3 6 8 5 1 1 5 6 4 9 2 8 7 5 3 4 6 7 1 9 2 4 2 1 6 8 7 9 5 3 su do ku Sudoku #8 2 5 9 8 3 1 KRAZYDAD.COM/PUZZLES 3 4 8 6 1 8 3 2 6 2 5 7 9 7 4 1 3 1 8 5 5 6 1 9 2 4 9 3 8 3 7 2 1 5 6 4 7 9 2 8 4 8 3 6 6 7 4 5 9 1 3 8 1 4 5 2 8 6 2 9 7 3 4 4 9 9 6 1 4 5 7 8 © 2008 8 2 3 5 6 4 1 KrazyDad.com 1 9 4 7 2 3 6 6 5 7 1 8 9 2 7 1 6 8 4 5 3 5 8 2 3 9 1 7 BOOK 65 4 3 9 2 7 6 5 #7 7 3 2 6 8 7 9 3 1 5 6 1 5 7 2 3 7 9 8 5 3 4 Check next Tuesday’s paper for 9 the solution to today’s puzzle. 2 ch 4 6 1 8
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