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8 Broadcaster Press June 26, 2018 www.broadcasteronline.com Come ‘Experience The Magic’ At The South Dakota State Fairgrounds By Mike Jaspers South Dakota Secretary of Agriculture Whether you want to “Experience the Magic” at the South Dakota State Fair or wrangle in some memories at the National Junior High Finals Rodeo (NJHFR), the State Fair Park is the place for you and your family this summer. We are kicking off our summer celebrations with the second largest rodeo in the world; welcoming nearly 1,000 young rodeo athletes from 48 states, five Canadian provinces, and Australia to compete in the NJHFR the last week in June. This is a great opportunity to showcase our state sport over the next two years. To learn more about all you can see and do at the NJHFR, please visit sdstatefair.com. I also hope you will join us for the 2018 South Dakota State Fair, Thursday, Aug. 30, through Monday, Sept. 3. This yearly celebration has a deep history with the State of South Dakota since 1885 and con- tinues to grow in attendance year after year. However, this year is extra special, as the State Fair Grandstand turns 100 years old. To honor this great achievement, we will be hosting a 1918 celebration where the State Fair will throwback to the year 1918, giving you and fellow fairgoers a chance to experience what the State Fair was like in the early 1900s. You will not want to miss the great 21st century acts coming to the grandstand this year either! Entertainment this year includes the Red Wilk Construction Tuff Hedeman Bull Bash; Toby Keith with Chancey Williams and The Younger Brothers Band; Foreigner and Night Ranger; Gary Allan and Sawyer Brown; and the “Thunder at the Fair” Outlaw Truck & Tractor Pulling Association. The annual state fair is a place to catch up with friends and take in a concert or a rodeo. It’s also an opportunity to recognize the important role agriculture has South Dakota’s Strong Foundation By Gov. Dennis Daugaard This month marks the 110th anniversary of the laying of the State Capitol cornerstone. The fourfoot by four-foot Ortonville granite cube, which features an engraving of the State Seal on the south side, cost $475 and was laid in a Masonic ceremony on June 25, 1908, two years before workmen completed the building. The cornerstone was dedicated by Gov. Coe Crawford and General William Henry Harrison Beadle, known as the “Savior of the School Lands” for establishing the permanent school fund in South Dakota and several other states. In his speech during the ceremony Gov. Crawford noted, in part, that the Capitol “will stand throughout the coming years as an expression of beauty and art, and as the people come and go and linger within its walls, they will see in it an expression of the soul of the state." In addition to serving as the Capitol’s structural base, the cornerstone is a time capsule, containing coins, building schematics, a Bible, photographs, newspapers, and a variety of papers, and speeches. When installed, it established a strong foundation for the capitol building. Or did it? Cornerstones are often the symbolic anchors of large buildings, but most offer just a glimpse of the strong support mechanism underneath. In the case of the State Capitol, the cornerstone rests upon a broad rampart of brick and ordinary fieldstones, hauled to the worksite from the fields and pastures of central South Dakota. Sometimes we see our elected officials as the cornerstone of state government, but this is only symbolic strength. South Dakota’s true foundation is its citizens. Earlier this month, we went to the polls and voted on individuals to stand for election this fall as our representatives on the school board, county commission, in city government, the legislature, Congress, and as our next governor. The right to vote is the cornerstone of democracy and our elected leaders serve as only the public face of a vast interlocking support network, working together to shore up our state. It’s the people who form the strong foundation of our government, our state, and our society. In many ways, our beautiful Capitol building does serve as an “expression of the soul of the state.” If you stop by the Capitol in Pierre, take a moment to visit the cornerstone in the building’s southwest corner, and remember the strong foundation that lies beneath. in South Dakota and her history. Every year at the State Fair, the South Dakota Department of Agriculture and South Dakota Farm Bureau recognize farms and ranches that have been owned by the same family for over 100 years through the Century Farm program. The Century Farm program symbolizes the long legacy of family-owned farming and ranching in the State of South Dakota. Since the start of the program in 1984, thousands of farms have been recognized for being in the family for 100, 125 or 150 years. If your family qualifies for this honor, we hope you take the time to fill out the application on the South Dakota Farm Bureau website and return it by Aug. 10, 2018. The State Fair has always been magical for me because it is a time to catch up with friends and family and enjoy the last few days of summer. I am excited for everything happening at the State Fair Park Seeing Stunted Yellowing Corn In Patches? BROOKINGS, S.D. - If growers are seeing stunted yelling corn in patches, it could be due to corn nematodes, said Emmanuel Byamukama, Assistant Professor & SDSU Extension Plant Pathologist. "Several plant parasitic nematodes infect corn leading to reduced plant vigor, stunted growth and yield loss," he said. Plant parasitic nematodes are microscopic worm-like organisms that live in the soil. They have a "feeding straw-like" structure called a stylet that they use to injure the plant roots and suck nutrients from the plant cells. "Some of the nematodes feed from the outer surface of the root without entering the root (ectoparasites), whereas other types enter the root and feed from within the root (endoparasites)," Byamukama explained. "Infected roots have reduced water and nutrient uptake and wounds created by nematode feeding can be entryways for fungal pathogens." Byamukama added that nematodes, in general, are slow movers. "They are spread through tillage and water movement within the soil," he said. "This is the reason corn plants with severe nematode infection appear in patches (Figure 1)," he said. Nematode infection in corn usually goes unnoticed or can be mistaken for other diseases such as root rots or nutrient deficiency. Yield loss due to nematode infection can still occur without necessarily observing above ground symptoms. Sampling for Corn Nematodes The first step to effective nematode management, Byamukama said is diagnosits first human WNV case in ing the type and density of corn nemaa blood donor from Todd todes in the soil. County earlier this month. "Since corn nematodes can be inside Including this latest round the root and also on the surface of the of grants, the state has provided local mosquito control root, diagnosis of these nematodes reprograms with more than $7.5 quires sampling both soil and corn roots," million in support, in either he explained. direct grant funding or conFor fields suspected to have corn trol chemicals, since the virus nematodes, four to six plants should be emerged in South Dakota. carefully dug out without injuring the A complete list of funded programs and grant amounts roots when corn is still young (before V6). is available here. The stalk can be cut off and only the Visit westnile.sd.gov for root mass sent to the Plant Diagnostic prevention information and surveillance updates. Health Department Awards $500,000 For Mosquito Control PIERRE, S.D. – More than 200 South Dakota cities, counties and tribes will share in $499,767 in grants intended to control mosquitoes and prevent West Nile virus (WNV), the Department of Health announced today. “South Dakota has a disproportionately high number of WNV cases when compared to other states. Local mosquito control efforts play a vital role in protecting our communities,” said Bill Chalcraft, administrator of public health preparedness and response for the Department of Health. All applying communities received funding, with grants ranging from $300 to $20,000. Grant awards were based on the population of the applying jurisdiction and its history of human WNV cases through 2017. Since its first human WNV case in 2002, the state has reported 2,432 human cases, including 778 hospitalizations and 42 deaths. Every county has reported cases. This season South Dakota reported 2.99 $ this summer and hope you have time to pay us a visit to see for yourself. GFP Asks Public To Leave Animals Alone PIERRE, S.D. - South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks (GFP) is reminding people that it is important to leave wild animals alone. “Sometimes people think baby animals have been lost or abandoned, when actually they haven’t,” says Thea Miller Ryan, director of The Outdoor Campus in Sioux Falls. “Mothers often leave their young for several hours before coming back for them.” Each year GFP receives numerous phone calls from people who find baby animals, and while people think they are being helpful, picking up the creatures can actually be harmful. “Tell your kids, your neighbor kids and your friends – If you care, leave them there,” reminds Ryan. Lab: SDSU Plant Diagnostic Clinic, SPSB 153, Box 2108, Jackrabbit Dr., Brookings SD 57007. To increase chances of determining if nematode infection is causing the symptoms being observed, Byamukama encourages growers to collect another set of four to six plants from parts of the field with no symptoms. To sample the soil, use a probe or a shovel to obtain 20 cores of soil between 6 to 8-inches within the root zone. Soil from non-symptomatic areas should be collected separately to determine population densities in symptomatic and non-symptomatic areas. Up to 2 cups of soil for each location within a field can be mailed or dropped at the SDSU Plant Diagnostic Clinic. Corn Nematode Management Every corn field may, to some extent, harbor corn nematodes. "What determines the need to apply corn nematode management practices is the type and density of nematodes infecting corn in a given field," Byamukama said. For instance, he explained, the threshold for needle nematode is 10 nematodes/ 100 cubic centimeters of soil whereas for spiral nematode, the threshold is 1000 nematodes. "That is why it is important to have the soil and corn plants tested in the lab to determine the type and density of different nematodes infecting corn," Byamukama said. The most common management practice is crop rotation. However, some the nematodes that infect corn can also infect other crops such as soybean. "Therefore, this practice alone may not be effective against certain nematodes that have a wide host range," Byamukama said. Nematicide seed treatments are another corn nematode management practice. The commercially available nematicide seed treatments include Aveo, Avicta Complete, Nemastrike, and Poncho Votivo. H Save0 on a Summer AC Tune-Up! $30 Breakfast Entree give 0a call and we’ll Just us With purchase of any beverage. send outk a qualified Service Technician like with the employment the right bp Since 1934 ads in the Broadcaster Press 201 W. 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