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8 Broadcaster Press September 18, 2018 www.broadcasteronline.com Cultural Heritage Center To Participate In 14th Annual Smithsonian Magazine Museum Day Event PIERRE, S.D. -- On Saturday, Sept. 22, all visitors to the Cultural Heritage Center in Pierre will be welcomed free of charge courtesy of Smithsonian magazine. This is the 14th anniversary of the event across the nation, and the sixth since the Museum of the South Dakota State Historical Society became a Smithsonian Affiliate. The event represents the Smithsonian’s commitment to make museums accessible to everyone across all 50 states by providing free admission to patrons, like the admissions policy of Smithsonian museums in Washington, D.C. Last year’s event drew more than 200,000 visitors nationwide, and 2018 promises to be even bigger. “We are delighted to participate in this program with our partners at the Smithsonian and many other museums around the nation,” said Jay Smith, museum director. “It will be great to see thousands of people taking advantage of this unique opportunity to visit some of the best museums in the world, and we are proud to stand alongside so many of our colleagues participating in this project.” The museum at the Cultural Heritage Center in Pierre became an Affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution in January 2013. On Sept. 22, the museum will also be conducting its annual “Traditional Arts Day” program with American Indian artists demonstrating their craft activities from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. CDT. There will also be a showing of the Smithsonian Channel™ film “Pocahontas: Beyond the Myth” at 11 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Visitors to the Museum of the South Dakota State Historical Society will be admitted free of charge on Sept. 22, but if they want to visit other participants in Museum Day, visitors merely need to visit Smithsonian.com/museumday, fill out a short form, and they will receive free tickets to the Cultural Heritage Center and other participating institutions. Museum Day tickets are valid on Sept. Rising Suicide Rates Require A Multifaceted Approach To Prevention PIERRE, S.D. — Suicides rates have been rising in recent years in South Dakota. In 2017, 192 South Dakotans died by suicide, the most ever reported. Suicide was the ninth leading cause of death among all South Dakotans and the second leading cause of death among individuals 15 to 34 years old. “Suicide is a leading cause of death in South Dakota— and it’s a tragedy for families and communities across the state,” said Kim Malsam-Rysdon, Secretary of Health. “From individuals and communities to employers and healthcare professionals, everyone can play a role in efforts to help save lives and reverse the current trend.” Mental health conditions are often seen as the cause of suicide, but suicide is rarely caused by any single factor. In fact, according to a recent Vital Signs report from the Centers for Disease Control Prevention (CDC), more than half of people who die by suicide are not known to have a diagnosed mental health condition at the time of death. Other problems often contribute to suicide, such B oad as those related torrelationships,eronl use, physical cast substancee in . However, health and job, money, legal or housing stress. com pinpointing these factors is often difficult. “Recently, South Dakota was awarded funding from the CDC to participate in the National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS),” said Dr. Joshua Clayton, state epidemiologist. “This new tool will provide us with a clearer understanding of the circumstances surrounding violent deaths such as suicide.” In coming years, data from NVDRS will be used to gain insight into possible contributing factors to suicide. In addition, the system will provide communities and organizations with important information to help them develop and tailor prevention efforts. Starting this fall, all fifty states now participate in NVDRS, the only state-based reporting system that collects data on violent deaths and their circumstances. South Dakota has resources available to help individuals experiencing suicidal thoughts and support for those who have lost a loved one to suicide. Individuals in need of help are encouraged to call the Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255). Services are available 24/7. Help can also be obtained by contacting any medical provider such as a family physician, psychiatrist or hospital emergency room, as well as a Community Mental Health Center or other mental health provider in your area. If you believe someone is at risk for suicide, contact a professional immediately. SDSuicidePrevention.org also provides communities and individuals with access to local data, prevention toolkits for specific populations as well as resources for survivors. For those who have lost a loved one to suicide, a list of support groups in South Dakota is also available. 22 only. At the Cultural Heritage Center, kids 17 and under are always admitted for free. “This is a great opportunity to come out and enjoy Traditional Arts Day,” said Jay D. Vogt, director of the South Dakota State Historical Society. “People can also visit the ‘Spirit of the 70s’ exhibit, which has proven to be quite popular over the summer.” The museum is open from 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. CDT Monday through Saturday, and 1-4:30 p.m. on Sundays and most holidays. Call 605-773-3458 for more information about exhibits, special events and upcoming activities. Grow In South Dakota By Dustin Oedekoven Interim South Dakota Secretary of Agriculture Not so long ago, and just before I entered high school, I was the jubilant recipient of a “Junior Agriculture loan” from the South Dakota Department of Agriculture. I bought my first ten bred heifers from a relative, kick-starting a new chapter in my 4-H career and launching my “S.A.E.” (talk to your local blue and gold jacket wearing FFA members if you need a translation). That loan helped to strengthen my tie to agriculture, just like SDDA loans help young farmers and ranchers today. It is important to help be a resource for young agriculturalists to help them get their start and be the future of agriculture in our state. Agriculture is woven into South Dakota’s past, and it is a bright part our future. When agriculture does well, South Dakota does well. When agriculture struggles, we all struggle. If we will strengthen our agricultural community, we can strengthen South Dakota. To help with this, the South Projects must follow the guidelines for Community 2x1 Dakota Department of Agriculture has a team we call our Forestry Challenge Grants. These guidelines can be viewed at: https://bit.ly/2NqlKGf. The Challenge Grant ap- Agricultural Development division, who specifically focus on the growth and promotion of agriculture and agriculplication can be found at: https://bit.ly/2CFzpEZ. tural products in South Dakota. A complete submission consists of: the application, a The Ag Development team focuses on making connecbudget sheet, a supplemental questionnaire, a work plan and two tree quotes if tree planting funds are requested. tions, bringing people together who are interested in moving ahead with projects, such as adding value to agriculIf you have questions, please contact Rachel Ormseth at tural products or expanding and creating farms or ranches. 605.280.4854. Whether awarding more than $300,000 in grants to those 3x1 Agriculture is a major contributor to South Dakota’s promoting and researching specialty crops in South Dakota economy, generating $25.6 billion in annual economic activity and employing over 115,000 South Dakotans. The or providing $3.7 million in assistance to producers and agribusinesses through finance programs; we strive to a be South Dakota Department of Agriculture's mission is to helping hand to those who want to grow in South Dakota. promote, protect and preserve South Dakota agriculture Our team is currently working with companies, commufor today and tomorrow. Visit us online at http://sdda. nities and private individuals on projects with a projected sd.gov or find us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. value of over $280 million to South Dakota’s economy. If you would like help with business planning, financial reviews, technical assistance, pre-feasibility studies, or other topics related to growing in South Dakota, visit our website at sdda.sd.gov/ag-development/ or contact our Ag Development team at 605.773.5436. Broadcasteronline.c om Broadcasteronline.c om 4x1 Goat Producers Attend First Annual Production Workshop YANKTON, S.D. – South Dakota’s first annual Meat and Dairy Goat Workshop was held in Brookings in July. Eighty-three participants from South Dakota, North Dakota, Minnesota, Nebraska and Iowa attended the event featuring industry expert presentations and hands-on training. The Value Added Agriculture Development Center (VAADC) along with collaborators South Dakota Specialty Producers Association (SDSPA) and South Dakota State University (SDSU) Extension organized the workshop at South Dakota State University’s Alfred Dairy Science Hall. “Interest was high for everyone there and information was well divided between meat and dairy producers,” said Tom Barnes, SDSPA Vice President and goat producer. Six highly qualified speakers addressed goat production challenges and solutions for both meat and dairy goats. Dr. Gerardo Caja, world renown small ruminant researcherof Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain, offered meat goat expertise during a hands-on session; Dr. Steve Hart, E (Kika) de la Garza Institute for Goat Research- Langston University of Oklahoma, discussedsmall ruminant nutrition, parasite control and marketing for goats; Dr. Alvaro Garcia, SDSU Extension Director of Agriculture and Natural Resources, spoke on raising a small goat dairy herd in South Dakota; Dr. Joe Klein, Veterinarian from White, SD, spoke on small ruminant veterinary protocol; Dr. Maristela Rovai, SDSU Assistant Professor & Extension Dairy Specialist, spoke on main aspects of milk quality and lactation physiology of dairy goats; and Dr. Ahmed Salama, SDSU Post-doctorate Associate in the Dairy and Food Science Department discussed heat and cold stress effects on goat performance. “Goat and dairy producers were able to take away excellent knowledge on goat health, feeding, lactation and handling from some of the nation’s leading small ruminant experts,” said Dr. Maristela Rovai, SDSU Extension Dairy Specialist. Attendees gathered practical information, which they can incorporate, into their operations to grow better meat and dairy goats. Vendors and sponsors were the American Goat Federation, Sioux Nation Ag Center and Pleasant Valley Goat Farm. SDSU Dairy and Food Science Department hosted the workshop and provided an area for the goats by Stargazer Stables and Farm, Parker, SD for the hands-on session. A delicious goat taco meal was prepared and served by two SDSU Animal Science Graduate Student Association members and meat lab manager. SDSPA gathered all the local food used for the meal, cookies and breaks. The attendees were also treated to goat cheese from Oklahoma and ice cream from the SDSU Dairy Bar. “The inaugural workshop offered a platform to initiate value added potential discussions,” said Cheri Rath, Executive Director of the VAADC. She added, the VAADC will begin working with meat and dairy goat producers identified at the workshop, along with any other interested individuals, to explore prospect marketing opportunities. Training and networking activities are anticipated for the future to help support this growing producer group. A 1-hour seminar on ‘Goat Production for Beginners’ is scheduled as part of the South Dakota Local Foods Conference, held Saturday, Nov. 3 in Brookings, SD. Tom Barnes of Pleasant Valley Goat Farm, Custer, SD will be one of the presenters. If you have questions about the developing goat producers’ network, contact Tom Barnes at SDSPAinfo@gmail.com. Visit http://www.sdspecialtyproducers.org to watch for upcoming events. RAISE YOUR Expectations. 101 W Main St | 605.624.4461 | CorTrustBank.com ID 405612
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