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12 Broadcaster Press October 30, 2018 www.broadcasteronline.com Weather Creating Harvest Challenges For Soybean Growers BROOKINGS, S.D. - Fall 2018's cool, damp weather has put the brakes on many acres of soybean harvest this year. "This year has been the perfect storm of late season moisture and temperature to cause harvest and seed quality issues," said Sara Bauder, SDSU Extension Agronomy Field Specialist. "We cannot always avoid these problems, but salvaging the best harvest possible and managing for next year should be first priority." To aid South Dakota soybean growers, Bauder, together with Laura Edwards, SDSU Extension State Climatologist and Connie Strunk, SDSU Extension Plant Pathology Field Specialist, share best practices. Late harvest "Although South Dakota has seen late harvest seasons in the past, this year is testing many farmers' patience considering the wet weather of the past few weeks and current climate outlook," Edwards explained. Edwards references data from the High Plains Regional Climate Center, explaining that October started out very wet, following on the heels of an exceptionally wet September. "In the Sioux Falls' area, 9.5-inches of rain was reported between September 1 and October 9," Edwards said. "This excessive moisture has made field access impossible and stalled grain drying in field." Edwards added, "Cool temperatures have further limited evaporation and the ability to dry grain in the field." Drier weather predicted Although current forecast models predict drier weather ahead, (as of October 10, 2018), with cool temperatures gradually moving east, Edwards said even if predictions are true, they will not help South Dakota's soybean growers much. "There is limited ability to warm up substantially at the end of October, as days are shorter and we have lower sun angle than in mid-summer," Edwards said. "The additional moisture in the soils and atmosphere also limits warming and grain drying after the rain ends." Drying Bauder said for most, the best case scenario this soybean harvest is to wait out the weather. "This means, waiting until the precipitation stops and the sun comes out, making soils dry enough for field traffic-ability and hopefully lowering seed moisture content," she said. Based on multiple factors, many producers have made the decision to store soybeans on-farm. Some of these factors include: •Farmers holding over old grain •Many commercial outlets only accepting dry soybeans (less than 13 to 14 percent moisture) •Increased commercial storage costs in some areas •Current market outlook "For long-term storage of soybeans (several months up to a year), it is recommended to dry soybeans down to 11 percent moisture," Bauder said. "With drying facilities available on-farm, some producers may choose to harvest wet beans, but others will most likely wait out the damp fall as long as reasonably possible." Cool & humid conditions not ideal "Under these cool and humid conditions, seeds will tend to absorb additional moisture from the atmosphere, which will most likely cause many fields to be harvested above 13 percent this year if dry weather is not predicted soon," Bauder said. As soybean pods mature and turn brown, seed moisture begins to decrease quickly. In a three-year Iowa State University study, researchers found that soybeans' dry down weight was affected by maturity group selection, planting date, and year. The study found in the first 12 days after plant maturity begins, soybeans dried rapidly at 3.2 percent per day. Then, after 12 days, dry down was stabilized at approximately 13 percent moisture (Figure 1). Grain quality issues Depending upon how long crops may need to remain in the field, grain quality may become a concern, because certain diseases thrive in current weather conditions,explained Strunk. "Many fungal soybean diseases, such as Diaporthe pod and stem blight, Frogeye leaf spot, Anthracnose and many other secondary fungi, can impact seed quality," Strunk said. Strunk said that at this point in the season, soybean growers' main concerns are moisture and storage temperatures to prevent spoilage during storage. "The best way to protect your crop from seed quality problems is to get it out of the field and dried down as soon as possible," Strunk said. "However, when balancing the forecast and drying costs with potential quality issues, each producer needs to consider what is best for their operation." Consult nutritionist before feeding infected soybeans If soybeans are heavily affected by a late season fungi, they may reflect poor seed quality. And, Strunk said that although these soybean fungi are not known for toxicity, a livestock nutritionist should be consulted before adding any soybeans to a feeding ration. When storing infected grain, Strunk said keeping it dry is key to preventing further colonization and maintain the best seed quality possible. "We can avoid re-occurrence of some of these late season diseases by implementing crop rotation, planting resistant lines in 2019, utilize a fungicide seed treatment and regularly scouting for disease infestation on stems and pods," Strunk said. Two More State Properties SDSU To Host Second Annual Swine Listed On National Register Of Historic Places Day On November 6 PIERRE, S.D. – Two more South Dakota properties were recently added to the National Register of Historic Places, according to the South Dakota State Historical Society. The listed properties are the Hyde County Memorial Auditorium in Highmore and the Long View Stock Farm in the Gann Valley vicinity of Buffalo County. The National Register is the official federal list of properties identified as important in American history, architecture, archaeology, engineering and culture. The State Historic Preservation Office of the State Historical Society works in conjunction with the National Park Service, which oversees the National Register program, to list the properties. "South Dakota's history is rich in American Indian culture, pioneer life and change," said Jay D. Vogt, state historic preservation officer and director of the State Historical Society at the Cultural Heritage Center in Pierre. "The more than 1,300 state individual properties and districts listed on the National Register are important for their role in South Dakota's culture, heritage and history. And when properties get listed, it shows that their owners take pride in their role in preserving that culture, heritage and history." Buildings, sites, structures and objects at least 50 years old possessing historical significance may qualify for the National Register, according to Vogt. Properties must also maintain their historic location, design, materials and association. Listing on the National Register does not place any limitations on private property owners by the federal government. Following is more information about these newly listed properties. Sheila’s Country Craft Fair Saturday, November 3rd • 9AM-3PM In The New Greenhouse • Handcrafted Decor – Lunch Sheila’s Country Gardens 3 miles south of Hartington, NE on Hwy. 57 • 402-254-6379 & Gift Shop Hyde County Memorial Auditorium, Highmore The Hyde County Memorial Auditorium was built in 1951. Located on a corner lot northeast of the intersection of 2nd St. SW and Cummings Ave., it is listed in the National Register at a local level for entertainment, recreation and architecture. The Memorial Auditorium was built to host many large community events, such as basketball games, concerts and theatrical events. Today, in addition to these activities, it also houses some of Highmore’s municipal offices. The building is also a characteristic example of the transition between the Art Deco and Art Moderne styles of architecture in the early postwar era. Long View Stock Farm, Gann Valley vicinity The Long View Stock Farm is listed in the National Register as locally significant in the areas of Agricultural History and Architecture. The farm serves as a significant local example of an early 20th century stock farm in central South Dakota. The one-and-a-half-story gambrel roof barn was built in 1917. With its triangular hay hood, one-story lean-to on the east elevation, and a one-story dairy shed on the west elevation, this is an archetypal example of the common South Dakota barn built in the early 1900s. Most of the historic buildings were erected during the tenure of Ernest and Minnie Sinkie from 1910 to 1948. The barn, 1910 farmhouse, storm cellar, garden, two large chicken coops, garage and outhouse with their immediate setting illustrate the evolution of agriculture over the early 20th century in Buffalo County. The farmstead overall retains its setting, location, feeling and association as well as design, workmanship and materials. For more information on the National Register or other historic preservation programs, contact the State Historic Preservation Office at the Cultural Heritage Center, 900 Governors Drive, Pierre, SD 57501-2217; telephone 605-773-3458 or website history.sd.gov/Preservation (click on National Register of Historic Places in the right column). Hartington Tree LLC TREE TRIMMING, REMOVALS & TRANSPLANTING TREES FOR SALE EVERGREEN • SHADE • ORNAMENTAL Yankton 605-260-1490 Hartington 402-254-6710 Serving Southeast SD & Northeast NE for 20 Years Kent & Kyle Hochstein • Licensed Arborists www.hartingtontree.com BROOKINGS, S.D. - The South Dakota State University Second Annual Swine Day will be held on Nov. 6 at McCrory Gardens in Brookings, S.D. “SDSU Swine Day is an opportunity to learn more about the swine industry in South Dakota as well as the groundbreaking research going on at the swine units,” said Ryan Samuel, SDSU Extension swine nutrition specialist. “Issues relevant to the swine industry continue to be investigated by SDSU researchers for betterment of the industry locally and abroad and will be discussed at the event.” The event begins at 9:00 a.m. with a poster session highlighting graduate research projects from the past year. Attendees are invited to visit with graduate students about their projects. The formal program will follow at 10:00 a.m. Steve Rommereim, recently elected president of the National Pork Board, will deliver a keynote address titled “A year in the life of a pig farmer.” Rommereim is the owner, operator and manager of Highland Swine in Alcester, S.D. He has served as a South Dakota delegate to the Pork Industry Forum since 2003 and previously served as president of both the South Dakota Pork Producers Association and Agriculture United for South Dakota. A U.S. Pork Industry’s Pig Farmer of Tomorrow, Adam Krause from Clear Lake, S.D., will discuss being a spokesperson for the pig farming industry through personal contact and social media. After a lunch sponsored by the South Dakota Pork Producers Council, SDSU Extension Swine Specialist Bob Thaler will speak about his experience as a Fulbright Scholar in Vietnam earlier this year. The SDSU swine faculty will also highlight some of their recently completed and ongoing research. This year’s SDSU Swine Day celebrates the second anniversary of the grand opening of the new SDSU Swine Education and Research Facility and Wean-to-Finish Research Barn in Brookings. Officially dedicated in October of 2016, SDSU Department of Animal Science researchers continue to utilize the $7.4 million facility to investigate issues relevant to the swine industry. The event is open to the public and registration is requested. The full schedule and registration information are available on iGrow. For more information, contact Ryan Samuel, Assistant Professor and SDSU Extension swine specialist at 605.688.5431. YOUR RADIATOR HEADQUARTERS! • Great Parts • Great Warranty On-Hand & In-Stock! NO WAITING! Cox Auto Irrigation Sales & Service 1007 Broadway Ave Yankton, SD 605•665•4494 - ROOFING - Asphalt Shingle - Steel - Flat - EPDM - SIDING - LP Smart - Cement - Vinyl - Stone - GUTTERS - Heavy Duty Seamless - Gutter Guard Irrigation PVC, Wire Installed, Well Drilling Domestic & Irrigation Pump Installation WATERLINE & ELECTRIC TRENCHING Tree & Concrete Removal, Site Clearing, & Ditch Trenching - EXTERIOR PAINTING Sherwin-Williams Pro STORM RESTORATION - HAIL OR WIND Certified Installation Experts Call Steve or Karl ALL TYPES OF DIRT WORK - FREE ESTIMATES Bobcats • Crane • Dozers • Excavators • Grader Grain Trailer • Scrapers • Side Dumps • Trenchers Vermillion, SD (605)670-9567 Hartington, NE (402)254-2568 Licensed in SD, NE & IA 605-595-7809 • Vermillion, SD
Weather

Fair 59.0 F
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Conditions:Fair
Temperature:59.0 F
Humidity:46
Wind:West at 16.1 MPH (14 KT)
Dewpoint:37.9 F (3.3 C)
Heat Index:
Windchill:56 F (13 C)


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