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Broadcaster Press 3 November 6, 2018 www.broadcasteronline.com Celebrating A Milestone The New Job For Democracy By Daris Howard By Gov. Dennis Daugaard The 2018 election is an important milestone for South Dakota elections. It was 100 years ago – on November 5, 1918 – that South Dakota voters, all men, gave women the right to vote in our state for the first time. It was a longawaited victory for voting rights for women. Women’s suffragists – both men and women – had campaigned for women’s suffrage since the 1870s, during the era of Dakota Territory. To celebrate this milestone, I have declared November 2018 as “Women’s Right to Vote Month.” It is an opportunity to remember the efforts of the suffragists who fought for this right for women, and to consider the many women who have played a role in politics since that time. Perhaps South Dakota’s most notable female political figure is Gladys Pyle of Huron. Pyle was born in 1890 into a political family – her father was attorney general, and her mother was a leading South Dakota suffragist. Gladys Pyle ran for the State House of Representatives in 1922, at the age of 32 and only four years after women gained the right to vote. She was elected, making her the first woman to serve in the South Dakota State Legislature. After four years, she was elected Secretary of State in 1926, making her the first woman to serve in statewide office. In 1930, Gladys Pyle ran for the Republican nomination for governor. She finished first in a five-candidate field with 28.3% of the vote. State law, however, required that the primary winner secure at least 35% of the vote – if no candidate did, the State Republican Convention would choose from among the primary candidates. This was bad news for Pyle – she was an outsider and many of the other candidate’s supporters wouldn’t support a woman. The deadlocked convention eventually took 12 ballots before, as a compromise, it nominated Warren E. Green, a Hamlin County farmer who had finished dead last in the primary with 7.4%. Had Pyle been elected, she would have been the first female governor in the United States who had not been the wife or widow of a previous governor. It would be forty-four years before another woman, Ella Grasso of Connecticut, finally broke that barrier in 1974. Pyle, however, went on to set another milestone; she became the We youth leaders in our community had just finished going through the straw maze and were waiting for some first woman to represent South Dakota in the U. S. Senate of the youth to make multiple forays through when the when she was elected to complete Peter Norbeck’s term conversation turned to the jobs the teenagers had been following his death. able to find. As we talked about this subject, Susan told us Many other women have followed in Gladys Pyle’s about a unique job her son, Jace, had had. footsteps, serving as secretary of state, state treasurer, He had come bursting into the house one day, filled state auditor, and public utilities commissioner. Former with excitement. “Mom, guess what? I have a job!” first lady Vera Bushfield briefly served in the U.S. Senate, Jace was young enough that Susan had her concerns. taking the place of her late husband. In 2004, Stephanie “And just what is this job?” she asked. Herseth became the first woman elected to the U.S. “You know how Mrs. Owen raises lots of parrots?” Jace House from South Dakota; she was succeeded by another asked. Susan nodded, so Jace continued. “She has asked if woman, Kristi Noem. Three women have served on our I would like to help her train them to speak. It will only pay state’s Supreme Court: Judith Meierhenry, Lori Wilbur minimum, but it would be almost every night, and it would and Janine Kern. Women have also broken barriers in the State Legisla- be steady work. Besides, she doesn’t live far away.” Mrs. Owen was their neighbor and lived around the ture. Mary McClure became the first woman to be a legiscorner. She loved birds. Her whole garage was full of birds, lative leader when she served as President Pro Tempore many she had raised from eggs. She had just about every of the Senate from 1979-89. She was followed by Debra kind of parrot or parrot related bird a person could imagAnderson, who was Speaker of the House from 1987-88; Jan Nicolay, who chaired the powerful House Appropria- ine or legally own. Susan could see why this job captured tions Committee from 1987-96; and Barb Everist, who was the imagination of her young son. But how does a person help teach a bird to speak? the first woman to be Senate Majority Leader in 2001-02. “Just what would your job entail?” Susan asked. As a state senator, I was privileged to serve with Carole Jace shrugged. “I don’t know exactly. I have never Hillard, who presided over the Senate as South Dakota’s first female lieutenant governor. Many other women have taught a bird to speak before. But I’m sure it can’t be that hard. I think that I will probably sit in the room with the served in leadership roles and as committee chairs. birds and just say certain phrases over and over.” In just a few days, South Dakotans will go to their “But why does she need you to do that?” Susan asked. polling places to cast their ballots. We will be electing a “It would seem she could do that herself.” new governor, a new congressman, and other statewide Jace’s eyebrows knit together, and he shrugged. “I’d officials. All 105 legislative seats will be filled. Voters will never thought of that. Maybe she’s just too busy.” consider five ballot measures, and many local govern“She’s retired, Jace, and the birds are her life. I’m sure ments will hold elections as well. It may be another historic year for women. Both gubernatorial tickets include she’s not too busy.” “Well,” Jace said slowly, as if thinking out loud. “I’ve women, and more than sixty women are running for the heard that birds learn to speak in the voice of the person State Legislature. they hear. Maybe she has some male birds, and she doesn’t This year’s election is 100 years and one day after want them to speak like girls.” South Dakota women gained the right to vote. In the Susan smiled at the thought. She was quite sure it scope of history, that really isn’t a very long time. It is a didn’t matter if a bird spoke with a female voice or male good reminder that voting is a privilege that we should never take for granted – there are still many places in the voice, but she couldn’t think of any other reason. Susan trusted her neighbor implicitly, so she didn’t see world where free, fair elections are only a dream. I hope any reason Jace couldn’t take the job. However, Susan’s that all South Dakotans – men and women – will study curiosity was such that she decided to join Jace when he the candidates and issues, and remember to vote on or went to his first night of work. before November 6. When they reached Mrs. Owen’s house, the old widow led them into her garage. Susan was given a chair so she could sit and watch. Mrs. Owen was carrying a bag in one hand, and she had Jace stand beside her. Mrs. Owen turned to Jace. “Jace, say hello.” Jace looked stunned and said nothing, so Mrs. Owen repeated the request. Jace said hello, and Mrs. Owen stuck a treat up to his lips, which he ate. including productive spawning and nursery areas for fish, Mrs. Owen then turned to the bird. “Patty, say hello.” habitat for aquatic organisms away from high river velociThe bird eyed both Jace and Mrs. Owen suspiciously. ties, and warmer water for temperature diversity. Mrs. Owen made the request again, but still, the bird said Once abundant, backwaters have been lost along the nothing. Once more Mrs. Owen turned to Jace. Missouri River due to channelization for navigation and “Jace, say hello.” construction of the main stem Missouri River dams. The Jace said hello, and Mrs. Owen gave him a treat. She National Park Service has prepared an Environmental then turned to the bird and once more said, “Patty, say Assessment for this project. It is available for review and hello.” download at the National Park Service Planning, EnvironSusan smiled, watching this for over an hour, and evenment and Public Comment website http://parkplanning. tually, a few of the birds caught the hang of it, said hello, nps.gov/bowcreekbackwaterrestoration. Comments may and received their own treat. be submitted on the same website or by mail to the MisWhen Susan finished with the story, I said, “That has souri National Recreational River 508 East Second Street, got to be one of the most interesting jobs I’ve ever heard Yankton SD 57078. This environmental assessment will be of.” open to public review until Nov. 13, 2018. Susan nodded. “The only downside was that, for Jace, the job was quite fattening.” Park Service Proposing Bow Creek Recreation Area Backwater Restoration The National Park Service is proposing to restore a backwater channel at the Missouri National Recreational River Bow Creek Recreation Area (located near Wynot, Nebraska). The agency is working in cooperation with the Nebraska Department of Transportation (NDOT) which will be seeking a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers permit for road embankment repairs and mitigation work along Nebraska Highway 12 (Verdel to Santee Spur Project, CN 32093). As part of their mitigation for impacts to wetlands under the permit, NDOT will restore a historic Missouri River backwater channel at Bow Creek Recreation Area. The National Park Service participated in the selection of the mitigation site because of the ecological benefits available through the restoration. Backwaters are parts of a river system not reached by the current, where the water is stagnant. They provide many benefits to aquatic ecosystems Agritourism In South Dakota By Dustin Oedekoven Interim South Dakota Secretary of Agriculture Fall is a fun time of year, filled with hometown football games, changing leaves, and of course, harvest festivals. These festivals can be found all across South Dakota, from Spearfish to Harrisburg, showcasing agriculture to those who want to create fun family memories by picking their own pumpkins, going on hayrides, finding their way through a corn maze and so much more. With so many uncertainties in agriculture today, many producers are diversifying by adding an agritourism component to their operation. In fact from 2007 to 2012, the value of agritourism grew to $704 million, an increase of 24% nationwide. Along with additional on-farm income, agritourism can help family members remain in the business or even provide an opportunity for others to return to the operation. The options available to producers looking at agritourism as part of their business model are varied, but all have the potential to connect consumers with agriculture. Agritourism offers many opportunities to interact one-onone with those who buy the food we grow and raise. In addition to creating opportunities for producers and consumers, agritourism can also help revitalize local communities. When more people come to the area to take part in the activities agritourism offers, they may also stop at the local gas station to fill up their car or grab lunch at the local eatery. All of which helps bolster the local economy. I can’t think of a better place than right here in South Dakota to capitalize on this new opportunity. For more information about agritourism in our state or to join the Agritourism Work Group for the latest updates and help starting agritourism on your operation, contact Jacey Jessop with the South Dakota Department of Tourism at 605.773.3301 or jacey.jessop@travelSouthDakota.com or an agricultural development representative with the South Dakota Department of Agriculture at 605.773.5436. Join us for a Soup Fundraiser Friday, November 16th, 2018 11:00am to 1:00pm tIonal Insur a Interna Hub t. (inside Bank of the West)Vermillion nce M 15 E , SD 5 a in S 70 6 $5 per person Vermillion Food9 All proceeds will be donated to the NOTICE Our office hours are Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. We look forward to serving you. Vermillion PLAIN TALK S e r v i n g o u r read e r s s i nce 1 8 8 4 . www.plaintalk.net 201 W. Cherry Street, Vermillion, SD • 605-624-4429 CURE FOR COLLINS PRESENTS… Pantry. Multiple soups and desserts to choose from. Shop for a Cause! - ROOFING - Holiday Vendor Fair Dakota Senior MealS FunDraiSer 10 Inch Pumpkin Pie $10 each Order by Nov. 16 & pick up Nov. 19-21 at 320 W. Main Asphalt Shingle - Steel - Flat - EPDM - SIDING - - GUTTERS - Call 605-624-7868 Weekly Meat Specials 2 $ 99 1 $ 79 1 $ 99 5 $ 99 November 11, 2018 12:00pm – 4:00pm - EXTERIOR PAINTING - Vermillion National Guard Armory LP Smart - Cement - Vinyl - Stone Heavy Duty Seamless - Gutter Guard lb. Sherwin-Williams Pro Fresh 90% Lean Ground Sirloin ......... lb. STORM RESTORATION - HAIL OR WIND Fresh 81% Lean Ground Sirloin ......... lb. Fresh Whole Select Ribeyes................... lb. Fresh Choice Rump Roast ........................ Cut & Packaged Free 2020 27th Street $ 79 Sioux City, IA Fresh Boneless Pork Loins....................... lb. 712.258.5992 $ 39 lb. Boneless Chicken Breast........................... www.laurencesmeat.com 1 1 Certified Installation Experts Call Steve or Karl 605-595-7809 • Vermillion, SD 603 Princeton St. • Vermillion, SD Get a jump start on your Christmas shopping! Various vendors and handmade crafts! Cure for Collins Bake Sale & Lemonade Stand! Free will donation & portion of the proceeds will benefit the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation in honor of 4 year old Collins Kassin who lives with CF LIKE & FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK: CURE FOR COLLINS Questions? Call Katie at 605-770-5195
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