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Broadcaster Press 5 January 1, 2019 www.broadcasteronline.com USDA Highlights Key Accomplishments In 2018 That Are Building Rural Prosperity In South Dakota HURON, S.D., Dec. 21, 2018 – Julie Gross, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development State Director in South Dakota announced year-end accomplishments achieved in 2018 for South Dakota totaling more than $440 million. This announcement coincides with Assistant to the Secretary for Rural Development Anne Hazlett’s national announcement of accomplishments that the USDA achieved in 2018 to build prosperity in rural communities. “Our agency has worked hard to create innovative ways to collaborate and implement best practices impacting rural prosperity,” said Gross. “By collaborating with partners and stakeholders, we have built upon the mission of creating economic opportunities and improving the quality of life of rural South Dakotans.” Here are a few highlights of South Dakota USDA Rural Development’s accomplishments for the 2018 fiscal year: Infrastructure • Helped finance 2 distance learning and telemedicine projects to use e-Connectivity at 51 hub and end-user sites to serve 412,426 rural residents and workers in more than 36 counties. • Supported the construction or improvement of 944 miles of electric transmission and distribution lines for rural electric infrastructure. These investments will benefit more than 25,372 business and residential consumers. • Provided new or improved broadband service to 6,300 rural households and businesses. • Helped finance 25 projects to provide new or improved water and wastewater services for 82,160 rural residents. • Worked with rural communities by providing financing for 17 essential community facilities projects such as schools, libraries, first responders, and municipal centers. These investments will serve 57,393 people. • Helped support the construction of 4 community infrastructure projects for streets, transportation, solar arrays, and water and storm water resources. These investments will serve 29,164 people who live and work in rural areas. • Provided financing to 76 rural businesses that created or saved nearly 573 jobs. Partnerships • Developed a pilot program to help Native American families on tribal lands buy homes. Two CDFIs, Mazaska Owecaso Otipi Financial in Pine Ridge and Four Bands Community Fund in Eagle Butte, are institutions in good standing with USDA. Each received $800,000 in Section 502 direct loan funding from USDA and will be responsible for contributing $200,000 in additional funds to pilot the project. These funds will be used to relend to Native American Families in tribal communities in South Dakota and North Dakota that meet the program’s requirements. Innovation • USDA Rural Development held a webinar through the South Dakota Governor’s Office of Economic Development and presented an overview of agency programs to economic developers, community leaders, and planning districts across the state. Housing programs have provided 1,196 families with a place to call home. In addition, 3,901 rental assistance and vouchers for low-income families totaled $19,272,221. The rental assistance and voucher program are offered to qualified low-income seniors and families living in USDA Rural Development financed apartment complexes throughout the state. In April 2017, President Donald J. Trump established the Interagency Task Force on Agriculture and Rural Prosperity to identify legislative, regulatory and Make Better Brain Health Your Top New Year’s Resolution for 2019 policy changes that could promote agriculture and prosperity in rural communities. In January 2018, Secretary Perdue presented the Task Force’s findings to the president. These findings included 31 recommendations to align the federal government with state, local and tribal governments to take advantage of opportunities that exist in rural America. Increasing investments in rural infrastructure is a key recommendation of the task force. To view the report in its entirety, please view the Report to the President of the United States from the Task Force on Agriculture and Rural Prosperity (PDF, 5.4 MB). In addition, to view the categories of the recommendations, please view the Rural Prosperity infographic (PDF, 190 KB). USDA Rural Development provides loans and grants to help expand economic opportunities and create jobs in rural areas. This assistance supports infrastructure improvements; business development; housing; community facilities such as schools, public safety and health care; and high-speed internet access in rural areas. For more information, visit www.rd.usda.gov. 10 Doctor-Recommended New Year’s Resolutions (StatePoint) With the new year upon us, you may be looking for resolutions that will help to keep you and your loved ones healthy and happy in the year ahead. (StatePoint) Alzheimer’s Disease is expected to impact playing strategy games are a few ways to strengthen your “This is the perfect time of year to consider your nearly 14 million Americans by 2050, according to the memory -- as long as they are new and challenging tasks. personal goals, and how you can make positive health Alzheimer’s Association. So, as you set your New Year’s Research has also found correlations between higher choices in the coming year,” says American Medical resolutions for 2019, consider the following ways to levels of formal education and a better cognitive reserve Association (AMA) President Barbara L. McAneny, M.D. maintain and improve your cognitive function. -- so sign up for a class in 2019! “Small lifestyle changes today can have a lasting effect in improving your health.” Research has shown lifestyle changes like improving Another way to promote brain health is taking care of To help you start the year off on the right foot, Dr. diet and exercising regularly have helped drive down your mental health. Managing stress and anxiety is not McAneny and the experts at the AMA are offering 10 death rates from cancer, heart disease and other major only important for overall health and wellbeing, but stud- recommendations to help you determine where you can diseases. These same lifestyle changes may also reduce ies have found a link between depression and increased make the most impactful, long-lasting improvements to or slow your risk of cognitive decline, which is often a risk of cognitive decline. Take care of yourself and seek your health. precursor to Alzheimer’s and other dementias. medical treatment if you have symptoms. 1. Learn your risk for type 2 diabetes by taking the self-screening test at DoIHavePrediabetes.org. Steps you Discovering risk factors and preventive strategies for Being social may also support brain health. That’s take now can help prevent or delay the onset of type 2 cognitive decline that can cause problems with memory, right. Add “hang out with friends” and “have fun” to your diabetes. language, thinking and judgment is a hot topic in AlzheiNew Year’s resolutions list. Better yet, take on several of 2. Be more physically active. Adults should do at mer’s research, as are multi-faceted lifestyle interventhese lifestyle changes for maximum impact. For examleast 150 minutes a week of moderate-intensity activity, tions to slow or prevent dementia. The good news? Many ple, enroll in a dance class with a friend. or 75 minutes a week of vigorous-intensity activity. such interventions are things you might already be doing 3. Know your blood pressure numbers. Visit LowerYor thinking about doing in the new year, such as eating Alzheimer’s researchers are now looking into whether ourHBP.org to better understand your numbers and take well, staying physically active and getting good sleep, a “cocktail” of these interventions can protect cognitive necessary steps to get your high blood pressure -- also just to name a few. function. The Alzheimer’s Association’s U.S. Study to known as hypertension -- under control. Doing so will Protect Brain Health Through Lifestyle Intervention to reduce your risk of heart attack or stroke. “There is increasing evidence to suggest that what Reduce Risk (U.S. POINTER) is a two-year clinical trial 4. Reduce your intake of processed foods, especially is good for the heart is good for our brains,” says Keith that hopes to answer this question, and is the first such those with added sodium and sugar. Also reduce your Fargo, Ph.D., director of scientific programs and outreach study to be conducted of a large group of Americans consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and drink at the Alzheimer’s Association. “Keeping our brains nationwide. more water instead. healthy is not something we should worry about only as 5. If your health care professional determines that we get older. It should be a lifelong effort.” While there’s currently no certain way to prevent Alz- you need antibiotics, take them exactly as prescribed. heimer’s and other dementias, there is much to be gained Antibiotic resistance is a serious public health problem One easy way to encourage brain health at any age is by living a healthy lifestyle and adopting brain health and antibiotics will not make you feel better if you have to stimulate your mind with problem-solving challenges. habits that you enjoy, so that you stick with them for the a virus, such as a cold or flu. Working on a jigsaw puzzle, learning a new language and long haul. 6. If consuming alcohol, do so in moderation as defined by the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans -- up to one drink per day for women and two drinks per day for men, and only by adults of legal drinking age. 7. Talk with your doctor about tobacco and nicotine use and quit. Declare your home and car smoke-free to eliminate exposure to secondhand smoke. 8. Pain medication is personal. If you are taking prescription opioids, follow your doctor’s instructions, store them safely to prevent diversion or misuse, and Tell them you saw it in the properly dispose of any leftover medication. 9. Make sure your family is up-to-date on their vaccines, including the annual influenza vaccine for everyone age six months or older. 10. Manage stress. A good diet and daily exercise are key ingredients to maintaining and improving your mental health, but don’t hesitate to ask for help from a friend or mental health professional when you need it. The lifestyle choices you make now will have long(StatePoint) Make winter a wonderland for dogs by lasting impacts. So, this new year, prioritize your longwww.broadcasteronline.com ensuring they’re safe when temperatures drop. term health by forming great habits. While dogs have fur coats, they can still get too cold in the snow, frigid temperatures, and severe storms. Particularly at risk are dogs that are short-legged, older, or sick, say the dog-walking experts at Wag! For winter 10,800 copies distributed with 27,000 dog safety tips and to find dog walkers in your area, visit readers per issue and now in a 201 W. Cherry, Vermillion wagwalking.com. More Bang for Your Buck! How to Keep Dogs Safe During Cold Weather Walks Broadcaster! Tell them you saw it in the Broadcaster! 624-4429 Tell them you saw it in the Broadcaster! larger, reader-friendly format! Call 624-4429 to get your ad in! This winter, take precautionary measures to keep dogs healthy and happy, no matter what the weather brings. It’s a Triple Play! 9 3 JGP3[QW3DW[3C3ENCUUKHKGF3CF3KP3 V 3 JG3$TQCFECUVGT32TGUU3KV3CNUQ3 T 3 WPU3KP3VJG38GTOKNNKQP32NCKP36CNM3 C 3 PF3VJG3/KUUQWTK38CNNG[35JQRRGT3 H 3 QT3C3EQODKPGF3EKTEWNCVKQP3QH3  3 3CPF3WR3VQ33 R 3 QVGPVKCN3TGCFGTU 624-4429 www.broadcasteronline.com Tell them you saw it in the Broadcaster! NOTICE 201 W. Cherry, Vermillion 624-4429 Our office hours are www.broadcasteronline.com Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. We look forward to serving you. Vermillion Don’t Strike Out With Competitors, Get Your Ad in the Broadcaster Press Today! 201 W Cherry • Vermillion, SD • Phone: 624-4429 • www.BroadcasterOnline.com PLAIN TALK S e r v i n g o u r read e r s s i nce 1 8 8 4 . www.plaintalk.net 201 W. Cherry Street, Vermillion, SD • 605-624-4429
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