Logo

Bookmark and Share


9



Broadcaster Press 9 March 3, 2015 www.broadcasteronline.com n RED, From Page 5 said. “It’s about being part of a group and it takes many of you to accomplish your goals. I get the wonderful opportunity to give kids experiences they can have with their friends that they can’t get on family vacation. “Music is that avenue that we get to do that and experiences those things with.” The Work, The Discipline English, mathematics, history, etc. are necessary components of an education while technically show choir is a “hobby” or a “fun thing to do.” But it can be one’s passion and to be great at something one loves, the time commitment has to be there. In the case of Show Choir, teamwork doesn’t hurt. “I feel like we are very close friends and we feed of each other,” senior Savannah Kirsch said. “We have show choir as a class too and that helps a ton. If we have choreography Monday night during rehearsal we can come back (to class) Tuesday and not have to wait for our next practice.” In between those moments where they can put their acts together, the performers are constantly reminded about their love of the art from the other Rhythm in Red members. “A lot of it comes from raw passion and a lot of us are really, really into this,” junior Joe Miller said. “I have a really good time with it. There is a lot of stuff that gets thrown at us, but it comes with priority. I push some other stuff off for this and I’ll have teachers tell me to do homework and I am just thinking about show choir. “We do have a really good sense of community here and have people really digging this. So in the 24 hours in between practices it’s a lot of people thinking about it. It’s pretty much all we talk about.” Miller admits that the talk is reserved usually for just members of the show choir but that alone is enough to keep them plugging along. For many, the needs of Rhythm in Red become a part of their psychological DNA. “The music stays in my head more than the dance moves so I’ll be taking a shower and I’ll have the show choir songs in the my head,” sophomore Max Askew said. What Kind of Kid Does This? “You have to have a joy for music,” Kirsch said. “Sometimes you get those kids who are not as confident themselves, but they like the music and they love to dance. We tend to bring each other up. So even if you come in not the most confident person you walk out of here with confidence.” Yes, it takes a love for the moves, the music, and the rhythm, to take the stage. But especially, one needs to love the act of performing to be a member of a show choir. “You have to love the performance,” Swanson said. “That’s why I am in it for. I have never really loved rehearsals, but I love the adrenaline rush that comes with performance. I think that might be what makes them a good performer, because that adrenaline and excitement for being in front of an audience. That’s when you get the facials and you really get groovy with the music because you are feeling it and it helps the audience feel it too.” Some of the greatest performers around are known for being shy kids and these Rhythm in Red members acknowledge that exists in Vermillion. “I know I am a lot more comfortable around an audience, because I don’t have to talk to them,” Swanson admits. “I just have to show them. I don’t have to build a personal relationship with any of them. I can just cheese out and they’ll love it.” It is also a way to express oneself in another conventional form. “For a lot of shy kids it’s a creative outlet for them. Stuff they keep in they let out onstage. They see it as therapy. Things that they don’t say, they say onstage.” To do show choir one must show some mettle to also survive the ups and downs of performance. Kirsch enjoys the high of watching a performance lift an audience. At the same time it’s not as uplifting to see her team do well and yet, the judges in attendance may think differently and reward them with a low score. “You feel like you didn’t get what you deserve,” Kirsch said. “You feel like you have to go back and start over again to building up to (a confident level) again.” “A lot of times we will come out of tough competitions where we didn’t make finals and we’ll be like ‘we were Snow Removal better than most of those groups,” Miller said. The Red Image to Uphold There is no true state competition for show choir in South Dakota – yet, there is one planned to begin next year, according to Fisher – but that doesn’t mean that the seasonal body of work isn’t taken any less seriously for Rhythm in Red as it would be for a football or basketball team. For these guys it’s nearly a school-year long grind, with practicing for these events kicking off near the start of the school year. A lot of them were already indoctrinated into the importance and the splendor of Rhythm in Red at much earlier ages. In Kirsch’s case, she moved to Vermillion for her freshman year and spent that time performing with the Maganda Bosses – the all girls’ group – before joining the full show choir outfit. “Growing up throughout the years has been awesome and have been able to see the group grow,” Kirsch said. “I’ve gotten closer to everybody. Just watching them my freshman year was awesome and was so inspiring just to work hard and get in it the next year.” Now Kirsch is wrapping up her final year with show choir getting to perform with her younger sister, Brooklyn. Miller’s brothers were involved and he began watching them when he was in third or fourth grade and remembered them being “really, really, good.” Miller says that Vermillion’s group is usually one of the smaller ones at many competitions. “Groups like Mitchell (High School) have 80 kids audition and 40 kids make it,” Miller said. “We still hold our own, because our standard of excellence is a pretty high standard.” Junior Natalie Swanson says that the standard was set by the precedent of greatness laid down years before. “There have been a few kids who have a whole lot of talent that have come through and have a whole lot of talent in show choir, and we see them, and we’re like ‘I wanna be like that,’” Swanson said. “As a sixth, By Sonia Hernandez The Plain Talk Dealing with frigid and snowy winters in South Dakota can make getting around difficult. Every time it snows, the City of Vermillion’s Street Department takes care of the cleanup. The department’s superintendent, Pete Jahn, says this year is no different than most. “This year has been pretty typical,” Jahn said. “The most snow we got was eight inches.” The winter storm he is referring to occurred on Feb. 1. Despite this relatively mild winter season, members of the Vermillion community have strong opinions regarding the city’s ability to remove snow and ice. “The snow piles in the middle of the road are annoying and dangerous,” says Brandon King, owner of R-Pizza located on Main Street. “The day of the most recent storm we closed. I didn’t want any of my drivers out because the roads were so bad.” Dominos employee, Jackie Riley, has worked for the establishment for five years, and has gained some perspective over the years. “I’ve had some close calls driving through intersections,” she says. “This past snow fall I had coworkers who had trouble getting out of their driveways because the plows blocked them in, and some were late because the streets were not clean in the morning.” Oftentimes the plows move snow in a way that ends up blocking driveways in residential areas, which can be a nuisance. However, not everyone shares the same sentiment. “It’s never been a problem for us,” says Marty Nygren, owner of True Value. “They always take the snow away in the morning before we open, and they do an awesome job.” Jacob Skelton of Grace Property Management agrees. n RED, Page 10 •Notice of Equalization Meeting• Romsdahl’s Repair & Remodel Let Our Family Business keep yours in the go with: Carpentry, Interior & Exterior, Painting, Refinishing, Drywall, & Ceramic Tile • Farm Filters • Hydraulic Hoses • Bearings & Seals Cox Auto Bethel Township will hold its annual Equalization meeting at 7:00 PM, Monday, March 16, 2015 at the Wakonda Legion Hall, Wakonda, SD. Written notices of appeal must be delivered or postmarked no later than March 12, 2015 to: Bethel Township Clerk 30506 455 Ave., Volin SD 57072 Darby Ganschow, Clerk Free Estimates 605-670-2161 1007 Broadway Ave. • Yankton • 665-4494 “I have not had any issues on my end. For the most part I think they’ve done a good job, even in regards to my personal residence,” he said. Dan Dethlefs, Vermillion resident and employee at Bunyan’s Bar concurs. “Honestly, I thought we were decent until I traveled to another town and saw just how good our snow removal team is,” Dethlefs said. “They’re pretty on top of it most of the time.” Jimmy John’s assistant manager Elaine McDonald has worked for the sandwich shop for three years, and has some insight on the topic. “Personally, I have not had any trouble with the snow, and neither have my drivers,” says McDonald. “Sometimes orders are delayed, but part of living in South Dakota is dealing with the snow.” Among these individuals giving positive reviews is President of the Board of the Civic Council, Wess Pravacek. “I’ve lived in Vermillion for 25 years, and I think the city has done a good job of getting the streets open,” Pravacek said. “Overall they have been timely and cleaning up during hours when it’s not too busy.” Vermillion’s snow and ice removal team consists of five personnel who utilize at least six pieces of heavy equipment. Jahn says, “The guys work all night and into the next day, and they even missed the super bowl this year,” Jahn said. “We have a great group of guys.” Jahn admits that repairs have set them back earlier this year. “An alternator went out on a piece of machinery, which cost us some time but we kept moving on while mechanics worked on it,” Jahn said. “We do what need to get done to keep everybody moving.” The department has looked at different approaches to removal but Jahn admits, “There has not been much change.” bp 201 W. Cherry St. • Vermillion, SD • 624-4429 624-4429 Broadcaster Press Classified Ads Since 1934 Since 1934 Use this convenient form to submit your ad to us for publication. for publication. Ad deadline is Friday noon for Tuesday’s publication. Payment must accompany ad. Payment must accompany ad. Ad deadline (One word per blank.) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Select Publication: Per Week Charge Broadcaster/Plain Talk/Missouri Valley Shopper ($13.55/15 words; 45¢/word after 15) __________ ($13.56/15 45¢/word after 15) __________ Combination reaches 35,000 homes +__________ Combo in the Norfolk Area Shopper ($9.51/15 words; 35¢/word after) ($4.95/15 15¢/ word after) +__________ Combination reaches 68,000 homes Fab 5 - - 8 papers ($42.87/15 words; $1.40/word 15) +__________ Ultimate58papers ($33.98/15 words; $1.20/word after after 15) +__________ Broadcaster/Missouri Valley Shopper/Norfolk/Albion/Plain Talk Shopper/Norfolk/Albion/Penny Press/Plain Talk Bold Face Type ($3.00):______the first($5.00): ______ ($5.00): ______ (.30¢/word after Photo 3):______ Photo +__________ +__________ Number of Weeks to Run Ad: x ____________ +__________ +__________ TOTAL COST: __________ TOTAL COST: __________ Call in your ad to 605-624-4429 Fax your ad to: 605-624-2696 Call in your ad to 605-624-4429 Fax your ad to: 605-624-6296 Email your ad to: classifieds@plaintalk.net Email your ad to: classifieds@plaintalk.net Or place your ad online at www.broadcasteronline.com Or place your ad online at www.broadcasteronline.com Name: ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Address: ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– City/State/Zip: –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Payment ? Cash ? Check ? Mastercard ? Visa ? Check ? Mastercard CC# ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– CCV: (3 digit code on back of the card:–––––––––––––– Exp. Date:–––––/––––– of the card:–––––––––––––– Exp. Date:–––––/––––– Signature:–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– (Bring in this form (Bring in this form with your payment to The Broadcaster Press. Payment must Payment must be received before the ad runs. Thank you!)
Weather

Fair 59.0 F
Click For More
Conditions:Fair
Temperature:59.0 F
Humidity:46
Wind:West at 16.1 MPH (14 KT)
Dewpoint:37.9 F (3.3 C)
Heat Index:
Windchill:56 F (13 C)


Shopper Issues
December 11, 2018
December 11, 2018
Published On
12-11-2018

December 4, 2018
December 4, 2018
Published On
12-04-2018

November 27, 2018
November 27, 2018
Published On
11-27-2018

November 20, 2018
November 20, 2018
Published On
11-20-2018