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May 3, 2016 www.broadcasteronline.com Broadcaster Press 9 State Commission Approves Log In To Safety First Round Of Bridge Grants BY BOB MERCER State Capitol Bureau PIERRE – Minnehaha County didn’t want to conform to the guidance set by the state Department of Transportation for South Dakota’s new program of bridge improvement grants. So Moody County got money instead. The state Transportation Commission approved more than $8 million of grants for bridge preservation and bridge replacement Thursday. The grants are the first made from a new program established in 2015 by the Legislature and additionally funded by the commission. DOT staff set a 100-point scoring system to rank projects. There were 20 applications from cities and counties for the improvement grants and 11 applications for replacement grants. Fourteen projects won approval Thursday for improvement grants. They included two for Beadle County; one for Brookings County; two for Davison County; one for Fall River County; one for Hughes County; three for Meade County; three for Rapid City; and one for Tripp County. The commission selected five projects for replacement grants. Those winners were Aberdeen, Marshall County, Roberts County, Yankton and Moody County. The grants cover 80 percent of the projects in all but one instance. That exception is Moody County, which will get $1,258,495 and will have to put up $334,623.75 as its match plus another $525,081.25 of local effort. The Moody County amount was based on the remainder after the other grants were funded. Originally Minnehaha County was in line for that money. Minnehaha received 62.49 points on DOT’s scoring scale. Moody received 62.46. But Minnehaha County already opened a bid for the project. DOT guidance said all bids needed to go through DOT. In an attempt at compromise DOT offered to recommend the Minnehaha County bid but the project would need to wait until 2017 and use DOT’s bid process. Minnehaha County was willing to accept the smaller award – its project, replacing the Split Rock Creek bridge north of Brandon, would cost an estimated $2.5 million – but wanted to proceed this year. The state commissioners debated for more than an hour how to handle the situation. Ultimately they turned down Minnehaha County and chose Moody County. Here are details on some of the projects: Aberdeen -- $1.3 million replacement of Third Avenue S.E. bridge in city over Moccasin Creek. State grant of $1,040,000. Marshall County -- $347,700 replacement of Langford Ditch bridge northwest of Langford. State grant of $332,144.80. Roberts County -- $366,000 replacement of bridge west of Peever. State grant of $292,800. Yankton -- $1,424,842 replacement of Pine St. bridge in city over Marne Creek. State grant of $854,904.60. Moody County -- $2,098,200 replacement of bridge west of Ward over Big Sioux River. State grant of $1,258,495. Davison County – Two improvement projects. $634,000 of improvements on 410 Avenue over Firesteel Creek; state grant of $507,200. $739,000 of improvements on 250 Street over James River; state grant of $591,200. Fall River County – $237,106 of improvement of County Road 21 bridge near Burdock over creek. State grant of $189,684.80. Hughes County -- $280,780 of improvements on 309 Avenue Bridge near Blunt over creek. State grant of $224,624. Meade County – Three improvement projects. $302,000 of improvements on Nemo Road bridge over Boxelder Creek near Tilford; state grant of $241,600. $595,000 of improvements on Alkali Road bridge over Belle Fourche River west of Hereford; state grant of $476,000. $353,764 of improvements on New Underwood Road bridge over Belle Fourche River north of New Underwood; state grant of $283,011.20. Rapid City – Three improvement projects. $230,000 of improvements on Twelfth Street bridge over Rapid Creek; state grant of $184,000. Improvements of $150,000 for Cherry Avenue bridge (Cherry / East St. James) over Rapid Creek; state grant of $120,000. Improvements of $357,500 for Cambell Street bridge; state grant of $286,000. Tripp County -- Improvements of $282,000 on 289 Street northwest of Clearfield over Willow Creek. State grant of $225,600. Book By Disaster Expert Teaches How To Care For Others A University of South Dakota professor summoned to Nepal after last year¹s massive earthquake has published a book based on a program he used there and elsewhere that teaches everyday people how to provide mental health assistance to each other. After the April 2015 temblor that killed more than 8,000 people and injured countless more, the American Psychological Association (APA) called in Gerard Jacobs, Ph.D., professor of psychology and director of the Disaster Mental Health Institute at USD. He has responded to numerous global disasters, including the 2001 attack on the World Trade Center and the 2005 tsunami in Southeast Asia. For the earthquake response, Jacobs and an associate in India worked with the World Health Organization and the United Nations to correspond with a committee of psychologists in Nepal. After months of preparation, they and other colleagues assembled in Nepal last November and certified 27 psychologists as trainers in what’s called communitybased psychological first aid. Those psychologists then trained people throughout the country who help each other cope with the disaster. “It was a real collaboration with the local people who worked with us to help book, available on pre-order, “Community-Based Psychological First Aid: A Practical Guide to Helping Individuals and Communities during Difficult Times,” outlines the approach and is aimed toward a general audience. “It’s a handbook for any group or individual that wants to learn how to take care of one another,” Jacobs said. “It could be a family member or friend who wants to learn how to support a person going through a personal trauma or someone Courtesy USD who has suffered a sexual or “Community-Based Psy- physical assault.” The goal of the approach is to create stronger, more Individuals and Communi- resilient communities, Jacobs said. “The basic idea is to help individuals know how to support one another -- their us design the training and neighbors, their friends and decided what they needed,” their colleagues.” Jacobs said. He first came across the concept in the mid-1990s while developing a psychological support strategy for the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies. Jacobs was so impressed with the model, first used in Denmark, that he and the Red Cross chose the approach to help developing countries that were just beginning to set up a system of psychological support. Since then, Jacobs has trained groups and individuals on the concept in more than 30 countries. His new Oscar Howe Summer Art Institute Deadline Approaching 7th Annual Military Order Of The Purple Heart Department Of The Dakotas Convention Planned Applications are due Friday, May 7, for the Oscar Howe Summer Art Institute at the University of South Dakota, which teaches high school students about contemporary Native American fine arts. A series of workshops SIOUX FALLS – The Military Order Of The Purple Heart June 5-17 focusing on Native Chapter No. 5355 of Sioux Falls will host the Military Order American culture, history Of The Purple Heart (MOPH) 7th Annual Department Conand tradition is open to 20 vention at the Disabled American Veterans (DAV) Headquar- students with an interest in ters, 1519 W. 51st Street, Sioux Falls, South Dakota on May visual arts. All courses are taught by professional art21, 2016. ists. Participants attend free A SPECIAL INVITATION to all veterans who have been of charge, including meals, awarded the Purple Heart Medal to be our guest at the housing, instruction and art MOPH 7th Annual Department Convention. Purple Heart supplies. Veterans from North Dakota and South Dakota will be atStudents are selected tending this outstanding convention. based upon an online apReservations for the Luncheon and Banquet Dinner can plication, letter of recommenbe made by emailing Mark at williesam@alliancecom.net or dation and portfolio of their Gene at davsd@midconetwork.com. artwork. Special attention is Mark Williamson, MOPH Department Commander states, given to applications from Native American students. “Legislative issues on VA Health Care, VA Budget, Claims The Oscar Howe Summer Processing, Agent Orange, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Art Institute, sponsored by (PTSD), Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI), Persian Gulf Syndrome, and other important issues will be discussed during the art department, honors the Open Session and the “Veterans Town Hall Meeting” on longtime USD professor and American Indian Northern May 21st, 2016 at 10:00 a.m.” Plains artist Oscar Howe. The The Agenda: institute aims to help educate 10 a.m.: Open Session the next generation of Native 11 a.m.: Veterans Town Hall Meeting featuring: Sioux Falls American artists and has VA Director Darwin Goodspeed; VA Veterans Service Center supported many students Manager Shawn Bohn; VA Vet Center Team Leader Michelle who have gone on to pursue Hough; and, South Dakota Congressional Delegation and/or a career in art. More information and a link to register is Staff posted at www.usd.edu/fineNoon: Luncheon (R.S.V.P.) arts/art/ohsai. 1 p.m.: Business Meeting 6 p.m.: Banquet (R.S.V.P.) Social and Dinner Consider it... Sold! Classifieds Read and Recycle! By Rep. Kristi Noem Remember the days before you could just Google it? If you wanted to figure out where the most complete skeleton of a T-Rex was found, for instance, you had to go to the library, dig through the card catalogue, find a book about dinosaurs, and fight through the paper cuts to find the answer. That doesn’t need to happen anymore. Through a device that fits in the palm of your hand, you can access the world – and by the same account, the world can access you. Often times, we choose to allow the world to see a piece of us. It’s that culture of sharing that has resulted in 300 hours of video being uploaded to YouTube every single minute and 70 million photos being posted on Instagram every day. Twitter, Facebook, and Snapchat let us share our every thought with followers, while text messaging and email has infinitely increased the speed of written communication. But like all things, there are smart ways to use these new technologies and some not so smart ways. Earlier this year, I teamed up with Google to offer Rapid City middle schoolers some advice on how to stay safe online. They shared five tips all of us should note. First, think before you share. Anything you put online – even if it’s done so privately – can be shared. If you don’t want it to get out, don’t post it. Second, protect your stuff. One of the best ways to do this online is to set strong passwords. HowToGeek.com offers this advice for setting a strong password: Select a password that has 12 characters, minimum. Include numbers, symbols, capital letters, and lower-case letters. Try not to use a dictionary word or a combination of dictionary words. And finally, don’t rely on obvious substitutions, like changing all of the O’s to zeros. Third, know and use your settings. Around 15 percent of Americans have never checked their social networking privacy or security account settings. These settings let you choose who you are sharing your information with. Check yours out and adjust them as necessary today. Fourth, understand how to identify and avoid scams. Every year, our office gets calls from dozens and dozens of South Dakotans who have received scam calls from someone pretending to be from the IRS. This is an obvious scam because the IRS will never reach out to you by phone without sending you a letter first. Other times, however, scammers may try to be more devious, posing as someone you know. Maybe they tell you your grandson needs money. If they start asking for personal information, hang up and give your grandson a call – he’ll be able to tell you if it’s legitimate or not. The final piece of advice that Google offered was to stay positive. Follow the golden rule: Don’t post, comment, or forward something unless you’d be alright with someone doing the same to you. We live at an incredible time that lets us be more personally connected to the world around us than ever before. I encourage you to take the time and learn how to be safe in this new environment. Oh, and before you pick up your smartphone to Google more about where that T-Rex was found – I did it for you. It was discovered near Faith, South Dakota in August 1990 – just months before the first webpage was posted to the World Wide Web. YOUR DOLLAR WITH A MEDIA THAT PERFORMS Broadcaster 201 W Cherry St. - Vermillion, SD - 624-4429 - BroadcasterOnline.com 79 ACRES OF SPRING VALLEY TOWNSHIP, TURNER COUNTY LAND AND 78.59 ACRES TURKEY VALLEY TOWNSHIP, YANKTON COUNTY LAND OFFERED IN 4-TRACTS AT AUCTION Our family has decided to offer the following land for sale at public auction located at 45022 291st St. Viborg, SD or from the 4-way stop in Viborg go 5 ½ miles west both sides of the road or from Center Point, 2-miles east on both sides of the road on: WEDNESDAY MAY 11TH 10:30 A.M. AUCTION HELD ON SITE It is our privilege to offer the following land located in these two tightly held townships located on the Turner & Yankton County line. This land auction offers powerful, high quality tillable land, improved acreage site with outstanding trees, waterfowl production/recreational land and will be offered in several combinations to accommodate any size buyer. Land is rented for the 2016 crop year. TRACT ONE: 78.59 ACRES LEGAL: The N ½ of the NW ¼ Section 2, 96-54 Yankton County, SD. and 2nd half paid 10-1-16. TRACT TWO: 27-ACRES + OR – IMPROVED LEGAL: to verify acres and approve legal description. Known as 45022 291st St. Viborg, SD. potential, endless possibilities. Several outbuildings included along with great park-like setting yard, and awesome trees. closing of this entire tract. set-up a private showing. TRACT THREE: 52-ACRES + OR – LEGAL: to verify acres and approve legal description. TRACT FOUR: LEGAL: TO INSPECT THE PROPERTY: We invite you to inspect the property at your convenience or you may visit www. mailed out. Contact auctioneers to schedule a showing of the home and outbuildings. TERMS: 2nd half payment will be made on 10-1-16. Property will be sold in whatever manner realizes the most for the seller. prepared to buy!! HEIRS OF HILRAY & MARLENE BARTELS –OWNER Wieman Land & Auction Co. Inc. Gary Ward Closing Attorney
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