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2 Broadcaster Press September 6, 2016 www.broadcasteronline.com Dave Says Private School is Busting Savings Dear Dave, Our three kids are enrolled in a private Christian school. It’s a great place, and we truly believe our kids are getting a wonderful, faith-based education, but the tuition is pretty expensive. We’ve already had to start digging into our savings to make this happen, and the kids are only in elementary school. Should we keep them enrolled, or should we transfer them to public school? Maureen Dear Maureen, I understand wanting your kids to get the best education possible. Private schools can provide some advantages academically, while a good Christian school might offer spiritual advantages. But the bottom line is this: If you can’t cash flow it, you shouldn’t do it. All of my kids went to public schools, and they are good, moral people and strong Christians. In the process, they learned how to interact with people of all faiths, no faith, and how to display their faith and beliefs adequately in their personal lives and in the marketplace. The truth is, you’ll find great things and bad things in any school, private or public, Christian or not. And no matter where your kids go to school, as parents, you still have to teach them about the world — the good and the bad, the right and the wrong. Life can’t be lived inside a protective bubble. —Dave Dave Ramsey What’s the deal with deferred comp? Dear Dave, I work for a fire department in Mississippi, and I’ve been trying to get information on the state’s deferred comp plan. No one here seems to know a lot about it, so I was wondering if I should keep looking for information or is it not worth the bother? Brandon Brandon, Deferred comp simply means you are electing to defer and receive a portion of your compensation at a later time or date. People who use these types of plans have a portion of their compensation withheld and directed into an investment of some kind instead, and you aren’t taxed on it immediately. It’s sort of like a pre-tax investment, but it’s not transferrable to an IRA or 401(k). I would only do deferred compensation after I’ve done everything else in terms of saving 15 percent of my income for retirement, including a Roth IRA. These are funded by after-tax dollars, but they grow tax-free. But I wouldn’t do any of this until after I had paid off all my debt, except for my home, and had an emergency fund of three to six months of expenses in place. Good question, Brandon! —Dave * Dave Ramsey is America’s trusted voice on money and business, and CEO of Ramsey Solutions. He has authored seven bestselling books. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 11 million listeners each week on more than 550 radio stations and digital outlets. Follow Dave on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com. Yankton To Be Capital For A Day PIERRE, S.D. – Gov. Dennis Daugaard announced today that Yankton has been chosen to be South Dakota’s Capital for a Day on Wednesday, Sept. 21. “Yankton was the first capital city of Dakota Territory, so the locals will essentially be welcoming the capital back to Yankton,” Gov. Daugaard said. “This will be an excellent opportunity for me By Sen. John Thune to learn more about the area and become better acquainted with the people who live there and the issues they care about.” The Governor’s activities for the day will include a Main Street walk, business tours around town, and a community social and coffee hour. The Governor will also hold a roundtable for community leaders to meet and discuss the needs of the city. “We are excited to be named Capital for a Day and welcome Gov. Daugaard and his staff. Yankton’s natural beauty, history and vibrant economy are just few of the reasons we love to call Yankton home,” said Yankton Mayor Charlie Gross. “As Capital for a Day, it will be easy for all to see why ideas flow here, and we look forward to showcas- ing the latest achievements we have made in education, quality of life, healthcare, manufacturing and entrepreneurship. Whether you take a stroll through our trail system, visit the historic downtown, or enjoy educational and after-school opportunities, Yankton is committed to our citizens and our future.” A complete agenda will be released at a later date. Home Every mile I travel in South Dakota is another reminder that I’m lucky to call this great state home and even luckier to have the opportunity to represent the hard-working people that help make South Dakota the best place to live, work, and raise a family. It doesn’t matter what season it is – winter, spring … basketball, pheasant hunting – spending time in South Dakota is the only way to recharge and the only place to get that special dose of reality that gets me through the inside-the-beltway craziness in Washington. While I’m home nearly every weekend, I really enjoy taking full advantage of the longer state work periods that give me the chance to spend more time with my family and connect with folks across the state to hear firsthand about what matters to their families. And that’s exactly how I’ve spent the last few weeks. There’s an old Johnny Cash song, “I’ve Been Everywhere,” which seems like the perfect way to summarize my summer. Unlike The Man in Black, I wasn’t in Reno, Chicago, or Fargo, but I did spend time in Rapid City, Pine Ridge, Eagle Butte, Britton, Selby, Madison, Aberdeen, and Parker – just to name a few. Parades, Rotary Club meetings, local businesses, you name it. Time on the road in South Dakota is time well spent, and as always, I learned a lot along the way. I toured the aquatic center in Mobridge, the clinic in Onida, Midwest Railcar Repair in Brandon, and the events center in De Smet. I met with tribal council members in Eagle Butte, members of the law enforcement community in Pierre, officials from the Indian Health Service in Pine Ridge, and the good folks at Avera St. Benedict in Parkston. I attended Rotary Club meetings in Gettysburg, Brookings, and Scotland, and I presented long-overdue medals to veterans and their families in Rapid City and Sioux Falls. And of course, summer wouldn’t be summer without a stop or two at the fair. I had a great time catching up with folks in Brown County and Turner County. The Sioux Empire Fair is always a favorite stop of mine, and I wouldn’t miss Dakotafest in Mitchell or Riverboat Days in Yankton either. It’s been a great few weeks, and I have the hundreds of people across the state who took the time to say hello to thank for it. All of the travel, tours, and meetings are meaningless without the important feedback I receive from farmers, ranchers, small business owners, hard-working moms and dads, and everyone else across South Dakota, young or old. It’s because of their strong commitment to our state and its residents that I’m always proud to call South Dakota home. CELEBRATION ION EBRAT C EL 312 W. 3rd Yankton • 665-9092 To make 4 8-ounce jars to give as gifts and to use in your own kitchen: 2 cups of diced tarragon fresh from the garden, or Farmer’s Market 4 long sprigs of tarragon 4 cups apple cider or red wine vinegar 4 Tablespoons sweet vermouth Heat vinegar to just below boiling, add diced tarragon. Turn off heat, cover the pan and let sit for 20 minutes to infuse. Pour warm infused vinegar Grace Freeman, RN is owner and operator of a over a strainer with cheesecloth into a small market garden farm 4 cup measuring cup. Add the fresh, clean sprig of tarragon into the 8 northwest of Vermillion. ounce jar, one sprig per jar. Add one She sells herb plants, and fresh herbs at the Vermillion Tablespoon of sweet vermouth per Area Farmer’s Markets on jar. Now divide the infused vinegar Thursday afternoons at the to each 8 ounce jar, until ½ inch from Clay County Fairgrounds off the top. Cap and store in a dark place, of Cherry St. in Vermillion. until ready to use or give as a gift. Herbed Butter Use on toast served with a fish or poultry dinner 1 pound of room temperature butter ½ - 1 cup of fresh diced herbs, such as chervil, parsley, sage, rosemary, tarragon, lovage, or dill Beat the softened butter in a bowl with a wooden mixing spoon. Add the herbs a quarter cup at a time, incorporating evenly into butter. Taste and adjust the herbs as desired. May also add a pinch of salt and/or 1-2 teaspoons of fresh lemon juice. Now, you can shape into a dome or a log shape for serving. For the dome shape, lay a piece of Saran wrap in a small bowl. Fill to the top with softened herb butter. Invert onto a plate. Keep covered in plastic in refrigerator until ready to serve. Or, lay out a large piece of Saran wrap onto a flat surface. Place butter in center in a one-inch wide band. Roll up tightly into Saran wrap, rolling gently to create a log shape. Twist up ends of plastic wrap and refrigerate until ready to serve. May slice into individual serving as a beautiful addition to bread or rolls. If you or someone you know would like to be featured in Cook’s Corner please contact micki.schievelbein@yankton.net www.broadcasteronline.com | 605-624-4429 201 W. Cherry Street | Vermillion, SD By Daris Howard We were in a theatre production, and the men’s changing room was nothing but an old converted closet. We were stuffed tight in there, which made for times of joking, telling stories, and barely getting into costume before the opening scene. One night we were still getting dressed when the preshow started. David turned to Jim and asked, “Jim, did you sign up for a preshow number? I heard that you used to be in a band.” “Well, you might say that,” Jim replied. “But some cows changed that.” “Cows?” David asked. “I was in high school,” Jim said. “There were four of us who decided we were really good musicians. We had big dreams of fame. The father of the band’s drummer told us we could practice in his garage. But after about a week of practice he changed his mind.” “So then what?” David asked. “The lead guitarist lived on an old farm. There was an old barn that wasn’t used for anything but storing junk. It also hadn’t been cleaned since the time the cows used it. The lead guitarist’s dad said if we would clean and organize it, we could use it.” “That was nice if him,” David said. “I think he just wanted free labor,” Jim replied. “Anyway, it took a couple of weeks after school for us to get it clean. The day we moved in was exciting. We were a long way from anyone who could hear us, and we bragged about getting really good and then surprising everyone. We worked hard at it, too. We practiced every night. The problem was, we were all selftaught, and every practice was a bit different because we could barely read music. But the most annoying part of the whole thing was that when we practiced, the cows in the pastures would come to the barn and moo until we could hardly hear ourselves. Our keyboardist assured us that it was because the cows liked our music and wanted to join in.” “Was it?” David asked. “I don’t think so,” Jim replied. “After we got to a point where we thought we were really good, we started trying to find gigs. We performed at a couple of places for free, but were never invited back a second time. We finally got a nonpaying gig at a bar and were paid in all of the Sprite we could drink since we were under age—too young for alcohol. No one cared what we played, and when the people got really drunk, they even tipped us a little bit. “No matter what we did, we couldn’t find any other place that would let us play. So then our drummer got this big idea. He said we should rent a big theater and invite everyone to come for free. He said we would pack the place and that would give us some recognition. “We all agreed that it was a good idea. The theater cost one thousand dollars for the night, so we each worked at part time jobs to earn the two-hundred-and-fifty dollars for our share, and a lot of extra for advertising. We rented the theater, made fliers, and posted them all over town. We put it on the marquee, bought ads in the paper, and did advertising everywhere else we could think of.” “How did it go?” David asked. “When it was time for the concert to start,” Jim replied, “not a single person had come, not even family and friends. So we opened all the doors and started to play, hoping to draw people in off of the street. After about an hour a lady and her daughter walked in and asked if they could sing. I said, ‘Lady, can’t you see we are having a concert?’ She looked at the empty hall and said, ‘It sounded so bad I thought it must be open mic night.’” David laughed and said, “Ouch!” “Yeah,” Jim said. “The drummer then said something which changed our lives forever.” “What?” David asked. “He said, ‘Guys, do you think that maybe all that time we practiced the cows were really just begging us to quit?” Jim paused and grinned, then added, “And that’s how I ended up in theatre.” Find the right job for you! Check Out The Broadcaster Help Wanted Section! 201 W Cherry Vermillion 624-4429 Ladies DREW Shoe Clearance Boston Shoes to Boots Tarragon Vinegar Member of a Band SCHIFERL’S WJ Ranch & Sponsors Present In Concert Suzy Bogguss Friday, September 9th, 8:00 p.m. Tickets: www.schiferlswjranch.com (402)357-2102 7 miles south of Yankton Ad Sponsored by Mark’s Machinery, Yankton 44th ANNUAL SOUTH DAKOTA FIDDLE FESTIVAL & CONTEST Sept. 9, 10 & 11, 2016 FREE ADMISSION 4-H Grounds - Old Highway 50 • Yankton, SD (Across from the Senior Citizens Building) Schedule of Events Friday, September 9 Sunday, September 11 7:00pm...Jamboree 10:00am...Gospel Sing Saturday, September 10 PUBLIC EVENT 8:00am - Workshops ALL AGES WELCOME 1:00pm - Contest 7:00pm - Performance by the Winfield Grovers 8:00pm - Barn Dance Camping - No hookups. Contact Information Phone: 605-661-9025 • www.fiddlersofsouthdakota.com fiddlersofsouthdakota@gmail.com Navigator Tours Let’s Go to Deadwood! • Rent adjusted to your income • Large 2 & 3 Bedroom units w/ A/C • Large Closets - one is walk-in • Off - Street parking • On-site coin laundry • Playground equipment • Just blocks from Campus, High School & Prentis Park OAKWOOD APARTMENTS 1200 E Clark St. • Vermillion Call Nikki or Dave (605) 624-9557 Sept 11-17th Outside the Lines! When was the last time you walked into your local library? All our great programming for kids and adults returns this week, along with these special events: Friday, September 16, 7pm Books & Brews ‘Happy Hour’ with our new Library Director, Daniel Burniston! In the ‘Beer Garden’ behind the library. Adults aged 21 and up only, of course. Live music, refreshments, a limited selection of craft beers to sample, and participants are encouraged to bring their own favorites. Saturday, September 17, 7 pm Outside the Library 'Drive-In' Movie Night in our parking lot! Popcorn provided; bring your own chairs and beverages. October 10-12, 2016 $179.00/person double, $239.00/person single Transportation, 2 nights lodging at Mineral Palace In downtown Deadwood, Wine & Cheese Reception, Hot Breakfast Buffett, $20 meal voucher, $10 slot play per day, Slot Tournament entry Pick up in Norfolk, Yankton, Tyndall, Mitchell Please call for reservations Navigator MotorCoaches • 1-800-634-8696 www.NavigatorBus.com vermillionpubliclibrary.org
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