Logo

Bookmark and Share


090616_YKBP_A8.pdf



8 Broadcaster Press September 6, 2016 www.broadcasteronline.com Accomplishing Education, Career Goal May Improve Native American Health BROOKINGS, S.D. - Setting and achieving goals related to income and education may improve the overall health of Native Americans. That’s the premise behind a new South Dakota State University research project, We RISE—raising income, supporting education—targeting young mothers on the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation in north central South Dakota. Lacey McCormack, an assistant professor in the health and nutritional sciences department, and Rae O’Leary, a nurse and public health advocate at Missouri Breaks Research Industries in Eagle Butte, will conduct the study. The one-year pilot project is supported by a $96,000 grant from the Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health through the National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities of the National Institutes of Health. The Cheyenne River Indian Reservation is the size of Connecticut and is home to more than 8,500 Native Americans. Nationally, Native Americans experience a 4.7 times higher rate of liver disease and 2.8 times high rates of diabetes than the general population, according to Indian Health Service statistics. “The idea came about because health disparities research typically controls for socioeconomic status in analyses,” McCormack explained. “We decided to try to change those socioeconomic variables.” The researchers hope to recruit 60 women, ages 18 to 30 who are high school graduates, have children under the age of 12 and are interested in goal setting. Enrollment begins in September. Those interested in participating should contact O’Leary at (605) 964-3418. The six-month intervention focuses on defining an action plan and then working toward a goal by accessing at least one new community resource. The intervention group will be mentored as they choose an income, education or career goal and will receive a guide listing 300 to 400 community resources they can access. When the study has been completed, the guide will be available to the public. For instance, O’Leary explained, participants may want to pay off a debt or finish a college degree. Accessing community resources might mean visiting with FF O y 10% ow & An l de dB Use Year Mo Any ous i k Prev in Stoc a credit counselor, applying for a grant to fund their education or enrolling at a local community college. Though many community resources exist, O’Leary said, “Programs don’t always do a good job of marketing themselves—this guide will help do that.” In addition, the Missouri Breaks staff will help participants identify a support person, someone they see regularly to encourage them as they work toward their goal. “It’s a long journey from goal-setting to changes in health outcomes, but we’re hoping this will have a ripple effect,” McCormack said. Once the women have achieved one goal, O’Leary explained, “the hope is that they gain the skills and confidence to ask themselves, ‘What other potential do I have that I have not yet uncovered?’” If this model proves useful, it could be integrated into an existing tribal program or school curriculum. “If we can change the socioeconomic status in a way that will change health behaviors, then we can expect to see some longterm communitywide improvements,” O’Leary said. Highway Patrol Announces September Checkpoint Schedule PIERRE, S.D. – South Dakota’s Highway Patrol has announced its monthly schedule of sobriety checkpoints for September. The checkpoints are intended to discourage motorists from drinking and then driving. The Patrol plans to hold 26 checkpoints in 21 counties. September checkpoints will be held in: Beadle, Brookings, Brown, Brule, Butte, Charles Mix, Codington, Day, Fall River, Hamlin, Hughes, Kingsbury, Lake, Meade, Minnehaha, Moody, Pennington, Roberts, Stanley, Walworth and Yankton. The South Dakota Highway Patrol is part of the Department of Public Safety. bp Since 1934 Broadcaster Press Check out our classifieds ONLINE! 201 W. Cherry St. • 624-4429 www.broadcasteronline.com A GREAT HUNT BEGINS WITH US! Men’s Women’s & Children’s Apparel 15% OFF • 10 days Only! Dog ng i rain T 20% OFF All Hunting Boots 10 Days Only! 3x12 Dog Dummy $11.99Scent Pheasant Training $4.79 Dove Decoys $14.99 Mojo Voodoo Dove $39.99 Mojo Clip-On 4 pack LOWEST PRICE OF THE SEASON! LG 700 FREE COVER 99 FREE PELLETS 699 $ TREE Archery STANDS Targets Starting at $39.99 Starting at $49.99 Dove Hunting Ammo Winchester 12 & 20 ga. lead Estate 12 & 20 ga. lead Kent 12 & 20 ga. steel $6.49 $6.49 $7.99 Stock Up Now! s gun ot sh •Pump •Auto •Over & Under •Side by Side •New & Used •All Gauges Check Out the Used Bow & Gun Selection. We have a Seasonal Surplus! “Where the buck stops and the hunter shops!” Dakota Archery & Outdoor Sports 2305 E. Hwy 50, Yankton, SD • 665-8340 • Open Every Night Till 9 p.m.
Weather

Fair 59.0 F
Click For More
Conditions:Fair
Temperature:59.0 F
Humidity:46
Wind:West at 16.1 MPH (14 KT)
Dewpoint:37.9 F (3.3 C)
Heat Index:
Windchill:56 F (13 C)


Shopper Issues
July 9, 2024
July 9, 2024
Published On
07-09-2024

July 2, 2024
July 2, 2024
Published On
07-02-2024

June 25, 2024
June 25, 2024
Published On
06-25-2024

June 18, 2024
June 18, 2024
Published On
06-18-2024