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2 Broadcaster Press May 30, 2017 www.broadcasteronline.com Dakota Senior Meals Served at The Main Street Center & Town Square, “Meals on Wheels” Please call before 9:00am to schedule or cancel a meal at 624-7868. Menus listed below are May 31 - June 6. Menus are subject to change without notice. All menus are served with whole grain bread and 1% milk unless otherwise noted. Thursday – Roast Turkey, Mashed Potatoes and Gravy, Seasoned Spinach, Chocolate Pudding with Topping, Orange Friday – Tuna Stuffed Tomato, Tossed Salad, Cottage Cheese, Fruit Crisp with Topping Monday – Chicken and Dressing, Mashed Potatoes and Gravy, Squash, Cranberry Sauce, Orange Tuesday – Roast Beef, Herbed Potatoes, Broccoli, Banana Wednesday – Upside Down Pizza, Pasta Veggie Salad, Tomato Juice, Banana Dave Says Midlife Adjustments Dear Dave, My husband and I are in our 50s, and we have just $12,000 to pay off before we’re debt-free. We’ve paid off almost $70,000 in debt in the last two years. We would like to buy a house soon, but we know we also need an emergency fund. It would take us almost a year to build up an emergency fund, so should we make adjustments to the Baby Steps since we’re getting older? Dawn Skipping to the altar Dear Dave, My wife and I make good money, and our daughter’s college education is pretty much paid for through pre-paid tuition and scholarships. We just started your plan to get out of debt and take better control of our finances. When we get to Baby Step 5, which is saving for college, can we substitute that with saving for a wedding? Bob Dear Bob, That would be fine. I’m glad you’re thinking ahead. It’s always a good idea to save toward a wedding if you have the financial resources to do so, because weddings are real and they’re coming. The average wedding in America today runs around $35,000. Of course, you don’t have to pay anywhere near that amount to make it a beautiful occasion. Your household income, debt, savings and other factors will all play into how much you can afford. Just remember to pay cash for the wedding, Bob. If you have to go into debt to make it happen, then you’re talking about too much money. It’s as simple as that. Crunch the numbers with your wife, and see what you two can handle. And remember, there’s absolutely no correlation between the cost of a wedding and the success of the relationship! — Dave Dear Dawn, No! It shouldn’t take you two a year to build up an emergency fund considering the rate at which you’ve been paying off debt. You need a fully funded emergency fund or three to six months of expenses set aside before you start saving for a down payment on a home. You’ve been making great progress, and you obviously have a good income to be able to pay off debt that quickly. Maybe in your case you could lean a little more toward the three-month side with your emergency fund before you start saving for a house. Then, after you’re all moved in, you could revisit the emergency fund and beef it up to six months. Just stay on course and stick with the plan, Dawn. Fifty isn’t old. * Dave Ramsey is America’s trusted voice on money and busiYou two have plenty of time to get your finances in order, find a ness, and CEO of Ramsey Solutions. He has authored seven bestselling books, including The Total Money Makeover. The Dave great home, and look forward to many great years ahead! Ramsey Show is heard by more than 12 million listeners each — Dave Dave Ramsey week on 575 radio stations and multiple digital platforms. Follow Dave on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com. Vermillion Summer Lunch Menu South Dakota Civil Air Patrol Locates Two Emergency Transmitters The Summer Food Program at Jolley Elementary will be serving lunch Monday through Friday from May 30th to July 28th from 11:00 am to 1:00 pm. This meal is FREE to anyone 18 or younger. For more information call 677-7000. Menu listed below is for May 31- June 6. Menus are subject to change without notice. Wednesday – Italian Dunkers with Marinara Sauce, Peas Thursday – Spaghetti with Meat Sauce, Steamed Carrots Friday – Tomato Soup and Toasted Cheese Sandwich, Black Beans Monday – Sloppy Joe, Mixed Vegetable Tuesday – Hot Ham and Cheese Sandwich, Golden Corn On the evening of May 23, the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (AFRCC) at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida requested South Dakota Wing assistance in locating an aircraft Emergency Locator Transmitter (ELT) reported broadcasting in the vicinity of Watertown. Colonel David Small took on the role of Incident Commander and began activating resources to begin the search. A Sioux Falls-based Cessna-182/G100 took off shortly thereafter and flew toward Watertown. At the same time a Sioux Falls-based Ground Team and a Brookings-based Urban Direction Finding (UDF) team were organized and dispatched. The UDF Team went to the Watertown Regional Airport and used their hand-held radio-direction-finding gear to search the area. While flying towards Watertown the CAP search aircraft picked up a strong ELT signal broadcasting from Arlington Municipal Air- With an ad in the 624-4429 Broadcaster port. The aircraft landed at Arlington and directed the Ground Team and the UDF Team to come there. The two teams used handheld radio-direction-finding gear to pinpoint the ELT in a plane in a hangar. The ELT was turned off and everyone thought the mission had ended. Col. Small called the Watertown Regional Airport manager to let him know and to verify they were no longer getting an ELT signal. However the Watertown Regional Airport reported that there were still receiving an ELT signal. The UDF Team, who had joined up with the Ground Team at Arlington, headed back to Watertown Regional Airport. However, before they arrived the airport manager was able to find and silence the other ELT. Two ELTs active at the same time within 40 miles of each other is an extremely rare occurrence. With both ELTs shut off the search aircraft and ground teams returned to base and the AFRCC closed out the mission. By Daris Howard No Good Deed Maria looked out the back of the truck as they traveled along through the darkness. She looked at the German soldier resolutely holding his gun in the ready position. As she considered what lay ahead, her mind turned back to many years previous at the grade-school playground. She was only six and had been playing with some girls when she noticed another girl their age. The girl’s blond hair fell loose over her tired blouse. Maria pointed to the girl. “I’m going to ask her to play with us.” The other girls laughed. “Are you crazy? No one wants her.” “That’s exactly it,” Maria said. “And she needs friends, too.” Maria was the most popular girl in first grade, and the other girls didn’t argue. Maria learned the girl’s name was Helga, and Maria soon had her playing with them. But at lunch time, Maria saw Helga go off by herself. Maria watched her and realized she had nothing to eat. Maria walked over to Helga. “I have extra lunch, would you like to share?” Helga barely raised her eyes but gratefully nodded. From then on Maria shared her lunch with Helga every day, and Helga became one of Maria’s best friends. Maria told her father about Helga, and her father, a good man, searched to learn more. One night, to Maria’s surprise, her father came into the kitchen followed by Helga’s family. Besides Helga, there was her mother, her father, and two older brothers. As they ate, Maria’s father and Helga’s father discussed business. Apparently, Helga’s father had had his manufacturing company destroyed in the Great War. Maria’s father offered to use their meager savings to finance the rebuilding of it. As the two girls’ fathers stood and shook hands, Helga’s father said, “No good deed ever goes unrewarded.” It was a phrase Maria heard him often say, as over the years the two families became close friends. Helga’s father rebuilt his company, and Maria’s father prospered from the investment. But then the Nazis rose to power. “Maria, it’s not safe for Jewish families like ours,” her father said one day. “We’re sending you to France to go to college.” Away at school, Maria was homesick. But when she found out that Jews were being rounded up in Germany, she feared for her family. Her last letter from her father told her to cease communication and to protect herself. She hadn’t heard from her family since. She didn’t know if they were safe or not. Then the war came to France, and the Germans started rounding up Jews there. She had heard that Helga’s father was using Jews in his factory. Maria wondered how, after all her father had done for them, that they could do that. She also heard that Helga’s brothers had joined the German army. Her thoughts came back to the present, and she looked at the German soldier. The image of Helga’s brothers came to her, and she felt bitterness toward Helga’s family. She and the other Jewish girls from her college had been taken in the middle of the night. They had ridden for a day in the cattle car of a train and then loaded into this truck. When they stopped at a check point, she heard the driver tell the guard the truck had “Jewish workers.” Maria had heard that the Jews were better off dead than doing slave work. The thought made her hatred for Helga’s family continue to grow. Suddenly, the truck stopped, and she wondered where they were. The soldier ordered them out of the truck. It was the middle of the night with no moon. The darkness was thick around them. In the darkness, a lantern was held in front of her face, blinding her. Then a voice she recognized yelled, “It’s her! We finally found her!” It was Helga. Maria quickly found herself enveloped in Helga’s arms. To Maria’s tearful query, Helga laughed. “Father uses the company as an excuse for Jewish workers, then sends them to England. The boat is waiting for you and your friends.” She handed Maria a paper. “Here’s the address where you will find your family.” When the German soldier escorted Maria to the waiting boat, she realized he actually was Helga’s brother. ‘Leave No Trace’ on the Black Hills National Forest OakwOOd apartments Black Hills National Forest officials would like to remind visitors to “Leave No Trace” when visiting the forest. Proper disposal of waste helps maintain a clean Forest and environment, reduces risks to wildlife, and is considerate of current and future visitors. “Recreational opportunities abound on the Forest, and it is important to keep the Forest clean for all usPRECISION PAINTING ers,” said Scott Jacobson, Public Affairs, Black Hills •Interior •Exterior •Commercial •Residential With an ad in the Broadcaster 624-4429 Smoke Free 605.624.9557 • Rent adjusted to income • Large 2 & 3 bedroom w/AC • Off street parking • Large closets - one walk-in • On-site coin laundry • Playground equipment • Just Blocks from Campus, High School & Prentis Park Quality Workmanship, Reasonable Rates 1200 E. Clark Street • Vermillion, SD Since 1983 CLINT TUCKER 624-4621 Edith B. Siegrist Vermillion Public Library’s 2017 Summer Reading Program Kick–Off Party Monday June 5th 1:00 pm 18 Church Street Vermillion, SD 57069 605-677-7060 vermillionpubliclibrary.org National Forest. At developed recreational sites such as campgrounds and picnic areas, visitors should always use the receptacles provided for disposal of trash, waste water and sewage. Visitors should also manage their trash and take it with them when they leave the Forest for recreational activities such as hiking, dispersed camping, target practice or hunting, which are away from developed sites. Remember, whatever is carried in, needs to be carried out. “To help keep the Forest clean and pristine, “take pictures and leave footprints,” said Jacobson. Many shooting areas receive heavy use and it is also important to remove items such as targets, materials used to hold targets, spent shells, cigarettes, food wrappers and beverage containers. Actions prohibited on NaRegister Now tional Forests include: Kids learn About Clay, Design, Painting, Drawing, • Dumping of refuse, deEnvironmental Arts, Dancing and much more bris, trash or litter brought onto the Forest. Info & Sign up on line at: • Placing anything in or Vermillionareaartscouncil.com near a stream, lake or other water feature which does not Or on the City Parks & Rec – Programs belong and may pollute the – Registration - Arts & Entertainment water. Ages 5 – 11 Week 1 July 3 - 7 • Week 2 July 10 - 14 • Disposal of garbage, in“NEW” Teen Camp July 12 -18 cluding paper, cans, bottles, sewage, waste water or rubScholarship Applications due by June 15th bish onto the Forest. Or Call 605 670 2588 – leave a message & we will get back to you. It is important for everyone to do their part in keeping our Forest clean and safe. If you see someone illegally dumping, please do not approach the violator. After leaving the area, contact The Clay County Commissioners will be making their annual your local Forest Service office and provide the followinspection of county roads, bridges, and drainage systems ing information: Tuesday, June 6, 2017 • Date, time and location of illegal dumping immediately following the regular County Commission Meeting. • Description of vehicle and license plate number County Highway Superintendent Rod Polley • Description of the perwill accompany the commissioners. son dumping • What was being County residents with concerns should call the Highway Office dumped at the site at 677-7149 or the Auditor’s Office at 677-7120 For more information on the Black Hills National Forto report their concerns, and the Commissioners will est, visit http://www.fs.usda. include the site on their tour. Carri R. Crum gov/blackhills. Clay County Auditor Messy Hands Art Camp NOTICE ANNUAL TOUR OF ROADS
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