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Broadcaster Press 3 February 13, 2018 www.broadcasteronline.com Food Plot Program Provides Supplemental Pheasant Habitat BROOKINGS, S.D. - When considering land management options for upland bird habitat, a major limiting factor landowners often find is nesting cover. Food plots are one tool a landowner can use to increase nesting cover. The term food plot refers to small plots planted to various crops or crop mixtures intended to serve as forage for wildlife. "If nesting cover is available in sufficient quantities, then improving habitat components for chick survival and overwinter survival can be beneficial for maintaining healthy bird populations," explained Jimmy Doyle, SDSU Extension Natural Resource Management Field Specialist. South Dakota Game, Fish & Parks Food Plot Program To assist landowners in providing winter food sources for wildlife, South Dakota Game, Fish & Parks (SDGFP) developed a food plot program nearly 50 years ago. Landowners can receive free corn, sorghum seed or a brood mix to plant each spring, plus a payment to help offset planting costs. The brood mix has only been offered since 2015, Doyle explained. "South Dakota's native wildlife typically don't starve to death during a normal winter cycle, so traditional grain-based food plots are more of a novelty to wildlife than a necessity," Doyle said. The mix was collaboratively developed by biologists from Pheasants Forever and South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks in an effort to increase the value of food plot acres throughout the year. "While traditional corn and sorghum food plots offer excellent food sources during extreme winter months, they lack much value to wildlife during other times of the year," said Brian Pauly, Private Lands Biologist, SDGFP. Developing the brood mix In 2014, after two years of collaboration the biologists tested the brood mix concept on a handful of Game Production Areas throughout the state. The trial plantings were monitored throughout the growing season, and observations were made to determine which plant species performed ideally and which did not. Using those observations, a final seed mix was developed for the inaugural planting season in 2015, when the brood mix was first offered to the public as part of the food plot program. "The concept of growing habitat types that benefit wildlife for more than just the winter months was easily understood by landowners," Pauly said. He explained that those landowners looking for a way to enhance pheasant populations on their properties were eager to try the new mix. In its first three years 50 percent of all landowners enrolled in the South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks' food plot program have tried the brood mix already. What's in the brood mix? The brood mix is an annual mixture of cover crop species (i.e. canola, flax, millet, radish, sunflower), designed to flower from spring through fall and produce seed for wildlife to forage on during winter. By flowering, the brood mix provides pollinator habitat that traditional corn and sorghum food plots lack. Pollinating insects (i.e. bees and butterflies) thrive in areas with flowering plants. Insects comprise nearly 100 percent of a pheasant chick's diet, therefore making habitats with high insect numbers for pheasant chicks to forage a key component of pheasant production. Simply put, more pollinating plants equal more bugs equal more food for young pheasants equal more roosters in the fall. First and foremost, healthy pheasant populations begin with large blocks of idle grasslands for hens to nest in successfully during spring. After hatching, pheasant chicks rely on quality pollinator plants to provide both insects for food, as well as cover to hide from predators. The brood mix offers landowners a way to provide young pheasants the habitat they need to survive between hatching on the grasslands in the spring to fledging in the fall. How should the brood mix be planted? The brood mix can be planted anytime in spring after the danger of frost has passed, and it can be drill seeded or broadcasted and drug in. Typically, the month of May has been an ideal time to plant the brood mix in previous years, but that may vary depending on which part of the state a property is located in and what weather trends are doing in a particular year. Before planting, it is important the site is prepared properly. The brood mix cannot be sprayed with any chemicals once it starts growing, so it is recommended to plant this mix in an area that does not have a current weed problem. If planted in the right area, at the right time, the plants will outcompete weeds naturally, thus negating the need to spray with chemicals at all. A long-term management plan by alternating food plots between corn/sorghum and the brood mix year-after-year will help to achieve clean, weed-free pollinator habitat annually, yearin and year-out. How can someone enroll in the SDGFP food plot program? SDGFP private lands biologists work with landowners to enroll in the food plot program. Funding for these projects comes from sales of hunting licenses, and landowners must agree to allow free and reasonable hunting access. Landowners still retain and may regulate all hunting access privileges on enrolled lands; however they cannot charge anyone a fee in exchange for hunting access. To learn more about the food plot program, or other wildlife habitat improvements, contact SDGFP or SDSU Extension. Pheasant Fest is Feb. 16-18, 2018 For landowners, managers, hunters or anyone interested in wildlife habitat management, the upcoming Pheasant Fest and Quail Classic in Sioux Falls is a great opportunity to learn more. Pheasant Fest runs from February 16-18, 2018 at the Denny Sanford Premier Center in Sioux Falls. To learn more visit the Pheasants Forever website. The event includes a trade show as well as numerous seminars covering habitat management, bird dog training, wild game cooking, and more. A workshop on the intersection of precision agriculture, wildlife habitat, and profitability will be of particular interest to farmers and landowners. Birthday Of Laura Ingalls Wilder To Be Commemorated In Cultural Heritage Center Program PIERRE, S.D. – The birthday of author Laura Ingalls Wilder will be commemorated at the Cultural Heritage Center in Pierre. Caroline Fraser will speak remotely about her book, “Prairie Fires: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder” at 7 p.m. CST on Tuesday, Feb. 13. “‘Prairie Fires’ was selected as one of the New York Times Book Review’s 10 Best Books of 2017. This program gives people the opportunity to learn the author’s insights into the book,” said Catherine Forsch, president of the South Dakota Historical Society Foundation. The foundation, which is the nonprofit fundraising partner of the South Dakota State Historical Society, and the South Da- kota Historical Society Press are sponsoring the free program as part of the History and Heritage Book Club. Everyone is welcome to attend. Wilder was born on Feb. 7, 1867. Her “Little House” books continue to shape ideas of pioneer life on the American frontier in the late 1800s. Before “Little House in the Big Woods” was published in 1932, Wilder had previously written a memoir of her life called “Pioneer Girl” that publishers rejected. The manuscript remained unpublished until 2014, when the SDHS Press published “Pioneer Girl: The Annotated Autobiography.” “Pioneer Girl Perspectives” is a collection of essays edited by Nancy Tystad Koupal, director of the Pioneer Girl Project, and published by the SDHS Press. Fraser contributed an essay to “Pioneer Girl Perspectives” that examines the relationship between Wilder and her daughter, Rose Wilder Lane. The professional relationship between Wilder and Lane is at the heart of “Prairie Fires,” according to Fraser. She will discuss this relationship during her talk on Feb. 13. Fraser is editor of the Library of America’s two-volume edition of Wilder’s “Little House” books and has written about Wilder and other topics for magazines and other publications. She holds a doctorate in literature from Harvard University. People in De Smet, Wilder’s childhood home, will be able to participate in the program at the De Smet Middle School through the state’s video conferencing network. They will be able to see, hear and talk to Fraser and people at the Cultural Heritage Center. People in other locations who would like the program broadcast to a location such as a school or university on the DDN should contact (605) 773-6006 for more information. “Prairie Fires,” “Pioneer Girl” and “Pioneer Girl Perspectives” are all available at the Heritage Stores at the Cultural Heritage Center and the Capitol. 4-H Developed Confidence In Abilities By Lura Roti for SDSU Extension When Kelly (Wilkerson) Bail sold Waves of the West, her rodeo sponsor flags business, in 2016, it was with a grateful heart. "The business supplemented our family's income and allowed me to work from home while my kids were growing up," explains Bail, 57. "I sold it because I was ready to have more time for my grandkids." When she sold, Waves of the West, the business was more than three decades old. And, the sponsor flags Bail and a small team of seamstresses handmade, were flown in rodeo arenas across the nation and at the National Finals Rodeo. Looking back on how her business got its start, Bail attributes her sewing skills and confidence to her years in 4-H. She got her start sewing as a 5-year-old, making clothes for her Barbie dolls. When she was old enough to join 4-H, her mom signed her up for Mrs. Mary Ellen Murphy's 4-H sewing club, Buttons and Bows. Murphy was an accomplished seamstress who Bail looked up to. "She was always dressed to the nines for a ranch woman - wearing wool suits with a hat and purse to match," Bail recalls. Under the watchful eye of Murphy, as an elementary student, Bail was soon making her own clothes. "I liked making clothes that didn't look homemade," Bail says. When her clothing was judged, the judges would often challenge her to try a new or more difficult skill for her next project. "I learned more from the white and red ribbons than I did from the blues and purples," she says. Later on in her 4-H career, when Mrs. Murphy was ready to retire as 4-H leader, Bail's mom, Arlene Wilkerson took over. "She spent many late night's before Dress Reviews supporting me," says Bail. In addition to sewing skills, Bail says outside of school, 4-H was one of the few social opportunities she had. Her dad worked for Custer State Park, so the family lived in the park, nearly 20 miles from town. "4-H got me out among people. I still have friends today that I met through 4-H," she says. Positive feedback from judges and accumulation of blue and purple ribbons gave her confidence in her abilities. So, when the opportunity came for her to turn her hobby into a business, she was ready. At the time, Bail was in her early 20s and working for a restaurant in Hermosa that had been asked to be a sponsor of Hart Ranch RV & Camping Resort evening rodeos. "My boss said he needed a sponsor flag, so I said, "why don't you let me try to make one for you.' Others saw my flag and started hiring me. Pretty soon, I was hired by the Hart Ranch to make all their sponsor flags. Then Sutton Rodeo got my name and my business snowballed from there,'" Bail says. Although she sold her business, Bail continues to sew. Only, today, when Bail sits down to her machine, it's to make blankets for her 12 grandchildren or for those in need. Bail is among a group of seamstresses from the tri-state area who make reusable feminine products for women in Ethiopia. More about South Dakota 4-H SDSU Extension's 4-H Youth Development Program is a partnership of federal (USDA), state (Land Grant University), and county resources through youth outreach activities of SDSU Extension. Youth learn and experience Leadership, Health and Wellness, Science and Ag-Vocacy through a network of professional staff and volunteers reaching more than 9,000 enrolled members with yearly programming efforts to an additional 35,000 youth participants. To learn more, contact your local SDSU Extension 4-H Youth Program Advisor. A complete listing can be found at iGrow under Field Staff icon. Let Our Family Business Keep Yours In The Go With: • Farm Filters • Hydraulic Hoses • Bearings & Seals 605-202-9179 Cox Auto 1007 Broadway Ave Yankton, SD 605•665•4494 VCDC Governmental Affairs Committee presents: Cracker Barrels with your Representatives Locally Owned & Operated Lawn | Landscape | Fence | Snow | Enhancement Weekly Meat SpecialS Fresh Pork Shoulder Roast.......... 1 4 99 $ 29 $ lb. Fresh Whole New York Strips...... Whole Ribeye’s...................... $ 99 Vermillion City Hall Council Chambers Sponsored by Vermillion Area Chamber and Development Company, League of Women Voters, Clay County Republicans, Clay County Democrats lb. lb. th lb. Irrigation PVC, Wire Installed, Well Drilling Domestic & Irrigation Pump Installation WATERLINE & ELECTRIC TRENCHING lb. lb. (16oz.) SatuRday JanuaRy 27th & FeBRuaRy 17th 9-11 am lb. 5 79¢ ¢ Or Chicken Thighs.............. 99 Fresh Choice Boneless $ 99 Chuck Roast......................... 2 2020 27 Street $ 99 Sioux City, IA Jamestown Bonless Hams... 1 712.258.5992 $ 29 www.laurencesmeat.com Best Buy Bacon ........... 2 (Cut & PaCkaged Free) Fresh Grade A Jumbo Drumsticks............... Irrigation Sales & Service Save-the-date: Business Day at the Legislature Thursday, February 22nd in Pierre th Dakota C Business Luncheon Series with Sou VCD r President, David Owen Chambe March 15th at 11:30am Contact us for more information at vcdc@vermillionchamber.com Tree & Concrete Removal, Site Clearing, & Ditch Trenching ALL TYPES OF DIRT WORK - FREE ESTIMATES Bobcats • Crane • Dozers • Excavators • Grader Grain Trailer • Scrapers • Side Dumps • Trenchers Vermillion, SD (605)670-9567 Hartington, NE (402)254-2568 Licensed in SD, NE & IA
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