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8 Broadcaster Press March 20, 2018 www.broadcasteronline.com National Ag Week March 19-23, 2018 Thank A Farmer Today! Road Salt & Water Quality: Growing SDSU Animal Science Concern in Some Northern States Department Presents by SDSU iGrow BROOKINGS, S.D. - While road salt throughout the winter months is seen by most as a necessity in our part of the country, it can come at a cost, said David Kringen, SDSU Extension Water Resources Field Specialist. "While the salination of South Dakota surface waters is not a water quality concern at this time, awareness of the issue could prevent it from being a concern in the future," Kringen said. He explained that salt corrosion can not only cause damage to our infrastructure (roads and bridges) and vehicles, it can be harmful to our freshwater ecosystems as well. Salination (or salinization), is the process where water-soluble salts accumulate in soils, or a body of water. It is typically measured by an increase in chloride, which is an anion of many salts (i.e. sodium chloride, magnesium chloride). In soils, salination is a concern, Kringen explained, because excess salts hinder the growth of crops by limiting their ability to take up water. "In freshwater ecosystems, increased salinity can significantly reduce both species richness (the number of species found in an ecosystem) and relative abundance (the abundance of a given species relative to the abundances of the other species) of aquatic plants and invertebrates; which in turn, affects the entire food chain," he said. Measuring Salinity Salinity ranges, measured as a concentration (milligrams per liter), are categorized as fresh to highly saline and can be seen in the table. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's nationally-recommended criteria for chronic (long-term) chloride toxicity exposure for freshwater aquatic life is 230 milligrams per liter. In South Dakota, surface waters designated as coldwater permanent fish life propagation waters are assigned a numeric standard of 100 milligrams per liter for a 30-day average and 175 milligrams per liter for a daily maximum. "Concentrations above these limits means the water body does not support the beneficial use assigned to it," Kringen said. For surface waters designated as a domestic water supply, the 30-day average and daily maximum concentrations are 250 milligrams per liter and 438 milligrams per liter respectively. What research shows A recent study conducted in 2017 investigated long-term chloride trends in 371 freshwater lakes in North America. "Results indicated that the density of roads and other impervious land cover was a strong predictor of long-term salination in Northeast and upper Midwest lakes where the study was focused," Kringen said. Other studies also recognize the link between the salination of water bodies with the application of road salts as metropolitan areas continue to develop and grow. "Keep in mind, runoff that enters city storm sewer systems to be channeled away is discharged untreated and delivered directly to rivers and streams; rivers and streams that we use for domestic, commercial and recreational purposes," he said. Research at Midwest Section Animal Science Meeting by SDSU iGrow BROOKINGS, S.D. - South Dakota State University swine researchers from the Department of Animal Science will present seven research abstracts at the Midwest Section meeting of the American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) and American Dairy Science Association (ADSA) meeting Omaha, Nebraska, from March 12-14, 2018. The Department of Animal Science opened the new South Dakota State University Swine Education and Research Facility on Oct. 1, 2016. The first anniversary of the grand opening of the new SDSU Swine Education and Research Facility and Wean-to-Finish Research Barn was celebrated with an inaugural SDSU Swine Day on Oct 11, 2017, in Brookings, SD. "The new swine facilities have opened up many new opportunities for our students and researchers," says Joe Cassady, SDSU Animal Science Department Head." The swine industry has and will continue to change and SDSU is now in a great place to be a leader in research, extension, and teaching." SDSU swine researchers will present the following research at this year's Midwest ASAS meeting: • Efficiency of Utilizing Standardized Ileal Digestible Lysine for Whole Body Protein Retention in Pregnant Gilts during Early, Mid, and Late Gestation. R. A. S. Navales, B. C. Thaler, and C. L. Levesque, South Dakota State University, Brookings. • Effect of Essential Oil Supplementation to Lactation Diets on Reproductive Performance and Fecal Characteristics of Sows. K. Fuoss1, M. D. Lindemann2, and C. L. Levesque1, 1South Dakota State University, Brookings, 2University of Kentucky, Lexington. • Immunological Response of Pigs by Lymphocyte Proliferation by the Supplementation of Beta-Glucans. ued growth domestically and globally H. Kerkaert, J. Koepke, C. L. Levesque, and B. C. Thaler, shows that consumers trust the curSouth Dakota State University, Brookings. rent approach that balances consumer • Growth Performance, Organ Weights, and Blood expectations and the needs of organic Parameters of Nursery Pigs Fed Diets Containing Coldproducers and handlers.” Pressed Canola Cake. J. W. Lee and T. A. Woyengo, South According to USDA reports for 2017, Dakota State University, Brookings. the number of certified organic operaResearch posters to be presented at this year's meettions increased domestically by seven ing: percent and globally by 11 percent. • Floor Space Allocation Effects on Heavy-Weight FinIndustry estimates show that organic ishing Pigs (over One Hundred Thirty-Five Kilograms). R. sales in the United States reached S. Samuel, B. C. Thaler, C. L. Levesque, and J. Darrington, almost $47 billion in 2016, reflecting South Dakota State University, Brookings. an increase of almost $3.7 billion since • Nutrient Digestibility of Heat- or Heat plus Citric 2015. Acid-Pretreated Distiller's Dried Grains with Solubles for The Department carefully considPigs. C. Zangaro and T. A. Woyengo, South Dakota State ered public comments and the relative University, Brookings. costs and benefits for both producers • Comparative Analysis of Bacterial Composition in and consumers of imposing the prothe Ileum of Weaned Pigs Fed Microbially Enhanced Soyposed additional regulations. bean Meal as a Potential Ingredient Replacement in ConMore information on the OLPP final ventional Weaning Diets. J. L. Ortman, B. St-Pierre, and C. rule is available in the March 12, 2018, L. Levesque, South Dakota State University, Brookings. Federal Register, and on the USDA NaFor more information, contact Ryan Samuel, Assistant tional Organic Program web page. Professor and SDSU Extension Swine Nutrition Specialist, at 605.688.5431. USDA Decides Not to Impose Additional Regulatory Requirements for Organic Producers and Handlers Significant policy and legal issues were identified after the rule published in January 2017. After careful review and two rounds of public comment, USDA has determined that the rule exceeds the Department’s statutory authority, and that the changes to the existing organic regulations could have a negative effect on voluntary participation in the National Organic Program, including real costs for producers and consumers. “The existing robust organic livestock and poultry regulations are effective,” said USDA Marketing and We Carry Regulatory Program Undersecretary Greg Ibach. “The organic Princeton • Vermillion, SD 57069 industry’s contin- USDA Press WASHINGTON, March 12, 2018 — The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) today announced the decision to withdraw the Organic Livestock and Poultry Practices (OLPP) final rule published on January 19, 2017. The rule would have increased federal regulation of livestock and poultry for certified organic producers and handlers. The withdrawal becomes effective May 13, 2018. Gates Hydraulic Hoses 1114 605-202-7231 V E R M I L L I O N FO R D understands the value of agriculture. This week we recognize and celebrate its abundance. Tractor Supply Company is the largest operator of rural lifestyle retail stores in America. Founded in 1938 as a mail order tractor parts business, Tractor Supply Company (also referred to as TSC) owns and operates over 1,600 stores in 49 states supplying a niche market for farmers, horse owners, ranchers, part-time and hobby farmers, and suburban and rural homeowners, as well as contractors and tradesmen. TSC's products include: clothing, equine and pet supplies, tractor/trailer parts and accessories, lawn and garden supplies, sprinkler/irrigation parts, power tools, fencing, welding and pump supplies, riding mowers and more. Stop in today to your local TSC at 509 W. Cherry St. Vermillion 605-624-4000 Get your ad in the.. Classifieds Today! 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