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2 Broadcaster Press Dave Says August 14, 2018 www.broadcasteronline.com Community Teamwork A Burden To Help? Dear Dave, Do you believe the adult child of a senior citizen, who is physically and mentally healthy but has neglected to plan for retirement, should be burdened with providing financial assistance to that parent? Robbie Dear Robbie, Based on the wording in your question, I can only believe you Dave don’t think the adult child should be “burdened” to provide this assistance. My guess is you’re talking about one of your own parents. I understand that you might be aggravated with a parent who has been irresponsible with their money. But in my mind, there’s a bigger question. How big is the burden? I talked to a guy recently who was making $1.5 million a year. He was questioning whether he should help his dad — an older man in poor health, who didn’t handle his money well — by giving him $1,000 a month. There’s no question you give that guy money. You’re making millions, but you don’t want to help your sick dad? Come on! But if you bring home $2,000 a month, and your family is barely getting by, you’re not morally required to financially take care of a parent who was irresponsible with their money. It’s all relative. Do you have the money? Can you provide this help without placing an undue burden on yourself and your family? If the answer is yes, you may be asking more about your own aggravation than any sort of moral obligation. But no, you’re not morally obligated to destroy your own life, or your family, to take care of a relative who didn’t take care of themselves financially. — Dave Ramsey Place an ad. Make money. By Daris Howard Separate Emergency Fund? Dear Dave, I’ve going to be debt-free with a full emergency fund in pace by the end of the year. I’m going to get a dog after that, but I wanted to make sure I did it the right way and was in good financial shape before making that move. Is a separate emergency fund for pets a good idea? Scott Dear Scott, My wife and I love animals. We’ve had a least one dog the whole time we’ve been married. Still, I think a full emergency fund of three to six months of expenses will cover you and your pet. You go through some expense as a pet owner, along with happy, wonderful times and heartbreaking things, too. We lost our golden retriever recently, and I can tell you that was really hard on everyone. You love them like they’re family, but you still have to use common sense sometimes, and remember that they’re animals and not human beings. Part of that includes spending reasonable amounts of money on them — and in some unfortunate cases — doing things with the animal’s best interest, not our own desires, in mind. What is a reasonable amount? That depends on how stable you are financially. It’s really a ratio question of expense to means. But no, I wouldn’t recommend a second emergency fund just for pets. — Dave * Dave Ramsey is America’s trusted voice on money and business, and CEO of Ramsey Solutions. He has authored seven best-selling books, including The Total Money Makeover. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 12 million listeners each week on 575 radio stations and multiple digital platforms. Follow Dave on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com. Dakota Senior Meals Served at The Main Street Center & Town Square, “Meals on Wheels”. Please call before 9:00am to schedule or cancel a meal at 624-7868. Menus listed below are August 15th to August 21th. Menus are subject to change without notice. All menus are served with whole grain bread and 1% milk unless otherwise noted. It works! Wednesday – 1c Hamburger Stroganoff over 1/2c Noodles, Green Beans, 1/2c Tropical Fruit Thursday – 3oz. Parmesan Chicken, 1/2c Scalloped Potatoes, 1/2c Corn O’Brien, 1/2c Jell-O Salad w/fruit Friday – Taco Salad, 2oz. of Meat/Black Beans/Cheese/ Lettuce/Tomatoes/Onions & 3/4c Tortilla Chips & Ice Cream Cup Monday – 1/2c Sloppy Joe on a Bun, 1/2c Potato Rounds, 1/2c 3-Bean Salad, Pineapple Tuesday – 3oz. Pork Chop w/ Mushroom Sauce, 1/2c Sweet Potatoes, 1/2c Green Beans, 1/2c Fruit Cocktail Call Today! 624-4429 Deer Hunt Available For First Time Youth Deer Hunters Carpentry, Decks, Windows & Doors, Re?nishing, Drywall, & Ceramic Tile Romsdahl’s Repair & Remodel 19 Years in Business Free Estimates 605-670-2161 Bergen Lutheran Church on Timber Road Ice Cream Social Wednesday, August 15th Advertise with the... 201 W. Cherry, Vermillion 605-624-4429 flood dAmAged Acres? Serving 5-7 p.m. The menu will include taverns, ice cream, pie, chips, drinks & hotdogs for kids Free Will Donation Now Hiring Herd Co, a progressive Feed Yard in Central Nebraska has the following Job Opportunities: • Assistant Cattle Manager • Mechanic • Mill Maintenance • Feed Truck Drivers • Nightshift Position Too often it seems like all of the news we hear is bad; at least a high percentage of it is negative. That’s why I always look for positive, uplifting stories. There was an event that occurred over the last few weeks in our community that is worth retelling. During this time of year in the west, we are often faced with dry conditions leading to major wildfires. This year, here in Idaho, we had an extremely wet spring. That is great for getting the crops off to a good start. But toward the middle to the end of June, the weather turned hot and dry. We haven’t had a good rain for a month or more. The problem with this set of events is that the heavy spring rains also made the grass and shrubbery proliferate. But then when the rains quit, and the sun heated everything, the grass and shrubs dried and became tinder for a fire. It made for a dangerous situation. Add to that dry lightning storms, lightning strikes with no rain to quell the sparks, and the fire season turned explosive. The dry rangeland to the north of us, thousands of acres of sagebrush and prairie grass, was in this exact situation. Fires started, presumably from some dry lightning strikes. Soon the fire was burning at high speed across the range. The fire crews rushed to save a small town that was in the fire’s path. They didn’t have resources to try to save the cattle that grazed this land. This is where the wonderful part of the story comes together. The ranchers, farmers, and anyone else who could, rushed to help those in need of help. People who work the land are often independent and determined to take care of their own needs, but what nature was throwing at them was more than anyone could face on their own. Everyone involved came together and made a plan. It was determined what land would be most defensible. All cattle would be driven there and fenced in together. The concern of separating whose animals were whose would have to be dealt with later. While horse riders set out to bring in all of the cattle that could be found, farmers took tractors and disks and harrowed the perimeter of the area where the cattle would be detained, determined to make a stand against the fire. By the time the cattle were rounded up and brought to the protected pastures, a large amount of soil had been turned to cover anything that would burn. The fire came and burned through, sweeping everything in its path, but it could not cross the harrowed fields. The smoke was heavy and caused the sun to glow red if it showed at all. Farmers with tractors also helped the firefighters, harrowing to create fire breaks around towns and homes in the path of the fire. For a week it was hard to breathe as the fire burned, but when it was finally brought under control, the damage was minimal compared to what it could have been. This valley is known for the early settlers coming into an arid, inhospitable land, and working together to dig canals that would bring the life-saving water to the crops. To survive, neighbor helped neighbor. No single man could do it alone. And when the work was finished, everyone benefitted as the water flowed to all. The people of this valley showed themselves to be worthy descendants of those early settlers. Even those whose land and homes were in well-irrigated areas and were not threatened by the fire, worked as if their own land and subsistence were at stake. And everyone who was not needed on the front lines worked as support. It was a wonderful story of community teamwork. And when all is said and done, there are few stories more worth retelling than one of community teamwork. Ask About free shipping Supplies are tight. Call now. producing quality seed at fair prices since 1963 dakota’s best seed 36656 sd hwy 44 • Platte, SD 57369 605.337.3318 PRESHO, S.D. – Ten first-time deer hunters will have the opportunity to participate in a mentored youth deer hunt on Sept. 22-23 at the Snake Den Lodge in Presho. The Lyman and Jones County Pheasants Forever chapters in partnership with the South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks (GFP) are hosting a free event that is open to first-time youth deer hunters between the ages of 10 and 15. The youth hunters must be accompanied by a parent or guardian to participate. Youth hunters will learn how to select the best ammunition and firearm for deer hunting, improve shooting and firearm safety, sight in a firearm and field dress and properly care for meat. Participants will be provided meals, snacks, lodging, deer licenses, guns, ammunition, safety equipment, transportation to and from the field, binoculars and assistance with field processing. “This youth hunt is built for kids who don't have the opportunity to hunt or who have never hunted,” said Lyman/Jones County Conservation Officer Spencer Downey. “We want to teach the kids about safety, ethics and being in the outdoors; all while taking part in one of our state’s most popular pastimes. It’s an experience they'll remember forever.” Each hunter will be paired with a knowledgeable and experienced hunting guide. Participation is limited to ten youth hunters. Applicants will be selected based on application responses. Successful applicants are required to attend a pre-hunt orientation meeting on the morning of Sept. 22. Hunting will take place on Presho-area farms on Sept. 22-23. For more information and to apply for this opportunity, contact Spencer Downey at 605.730.0774 or youthdeerhunt@gmail.com. Application deadline is Aug. 31. Beard Don’s Dust Control Competitive Wages. Excellent Benefits. Vermillion Call: 402-482-5931 For more information Request Brenden or Chad August 16th, 5:30 – 7:30pm • Horse Arenas • Private & Commerical Drives • Unpaved Roads • Grain Elevator Access • Free Estimates 605-491-2133
Weather

Fair 59.0 F
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Conditions:Fair
Temperature:59.0 F
Humidity:46
Wind:West at 16.1 MPH (14 KT)
Dewpoint:37.9 F (3.3 C)
Heat Index:
Windchill:56 F (13 C)


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