Logo

Bookmark and Share


012219_YKBP_A8.pdf



8 Broadcaster Press January 22, 2019 www.broadcasteronline.com Stretch Your SNAP Funds With these SDSU Extension Tips BROOKINGS, S.D. - U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, Sonny Purdue, authorized the early release of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) funds. January 20, 2019, more than 93,250 South Dakotans who depend upon SNAP to help feed themselves and their families will receive their February SNAP funds. This is not an additional benefit. The early release is due to the partial government shutdown. We do not know how long the shutdown will last, even if it ends in February, individuals still won’t receive their benefits until March 10. Receiving food assistance early could create a challenge, explained Kimberly Wilson, Family & Community Health Field Specialist, who works with the Expanded Food and Nutrition Program (EFNEP) & SNAP-Education (SNAP-Ed). Typically, SNAP recipients would receive these funds February 10. “South Dakotans need to make these dollars last, because this is their February payment,” said Wilson, of the funds designed to supplement a grocery budget by about $4 per-person-per-day. “Because these funds are only designed to provide a percentage of the money necessary to feed a family, sadly, for many families, when they receive SNAP benefits January 20, their accounts may already beempty.” Wilson is among a team of SDSU Extension staff who are working with South Dakotans to help them stretch their SNAP funds. The SDSU Extension nutrition team is available in locations across South Dakota to meet over the phone or one-on-one with individuals and help them create low-cost, healthy meal plans. SNAP funds don’t expire – plan to make them last Once SNAP funds are issued, they are good for 12 months. They do not expire for a year and do not have to be used the same month they are issued. To help stretch the grocery budget, Prairey Walkling, SDSU Extension Family & Community Health Field Specialist, said to begin by meal planning. “Meal planning allows you to take advantage of sales offered at grocery stores, it reduces the number of trips you make to the grocery store and, it allows you to plan healthy, low-cost meals,” said Walkling, who meal plans for her family of four a week at a time. “I encourage making a plan for five, low-cost main dishes. If you have ingredients you need for five main dishes, then you can re-purpose left-overs for the other two days in a week.” Annual Mitchell Soil Health Event Set for February 14 at Highland Conference Center BROOKINGS, S.D. - SDSU Extension will host the annual Mitchell Soil Health Event February 14, 2019 at the Highland Conference Center (2000 Highland Way) in Mitchell. The event will focus on cover crops and their role in nutrient cycling, moisture management and soil biology and includes speakers and vendor booths. The event begins and 9:30 a.m. and runs until 4 p.m. Certified Crop Advisor credits are available. The event is offered at no cost and includes lunch. Topic highlights Cover Crops as a Management Tool - Lee Briese, independent crop consultant from south central North Dakota, will address the challenges of soil degradation, pest management and economic profitability. Briese was named 2016 Consultant of the Year from the National Alliance of Independent Crop Consultants (NAICC) and was the 2017 International Certified Crop Adviser (ICCA) of the Year. He currently works with growers in North Dakota. Regenerating Soils with Microbiology - Kris Nichols, founder and principal scientist of KRIS (Knowledge for Regeneration and Innovation in Soils) Systems. Nichols is a soil biologist by trade, and spent 11 years as a Research Soil Biologist at the USDA Research Station at Mandan, N.D. She will discuss addressing current and future agricultural needs by building upon a soil health foundation and identifying biological methods for agricultural production, tools and practices to help reduce pest issues, soil erosion, fossil fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions. Cover Crop Nutrient Cycling in South Dakota - Anthony Bly, SDSU Extension Soils Field Specialist. Bly is the lead researcher on a large research project, based in South Dakota, that looks at the role cover crops play in nutrient cycling in soils. He will share some initial observations based on the first year of results. Farmer Panel - Area producers will share their experiences with cover crops, no till and livestock integration. Pre-register by February 8 To accommodate for lunch, organizers are asking that attendees pre-register by calling the Davison Conservation District office at 605.996.1564, ext. 3 or email Heidi Rients on or before 5 p.m. February 8. More information and a full agenda for the soil health workshop can be viewed online at the Extension events page or at the SD No-Till Association website. BROOKINGS, S.D. - Brookings County 4-H made and donated 77 blankets, during the 2017-2018 state-wide Blanket Buddies service project - the most blankets donated of any South Dakota county “Service to community is among the core values upon which 4-H is built,” explains Hilary Risner, SDSU Extension Regional 4-H Youth Program Advisor. “It states in the pledge 4-Hers recite each club meeting, “I pledge my hands to larger service…’” And service to their community is the reason the Bruce Honey Bees 4-H Club set aside time during their club meeting to make 13 blankets to donate to a local nursing home, the Estelline Nursing & Care Center. “It shows the members that if we all come together as a team, we can make a much larger impact than working on something by ourselves,” says Bobbi Shultz, the club’s leader. Character-building traits, like service to others, is among the reasons Shultz and her husband, Chad, wanted their three children, Elizabeth, 14; Trevor, 11 and Zachary, 9; to become involved in 4-H. “We were both 4-H members growing up and we couldn’t wait to have our kids involved in 4-H,” says Shultz, who credits the public speaking practice she received as a 4-H member with preparing her to be comfortable making presentations today as a professional. This year, her daughter, Elizabeth put together a 4-H presentation on How-To-Store Lettuce and would agree with her mom. “I like how there are a lot of different activities I can do. I have learned how to become a better leader,” Elizabeth serves as the club President and is an eighth grader at Sioux Valley Cox Auto 605•665•4494 TODD’S ELECTRIC SERVICE “The Line To Power” Design/Build • Fiber Cabling • Commercial • Residential Service Calls • Boom Truck with Auger • Trenching Serving the Beresford and Vermillion Areas 1-800-560-2518 1221 Cornell St., Vermillion, SD • 605-624-5642 201 NW 13th St., Ste. 3, Beresford, SD • 800-560-2518 School. Elizabeth also enjoyed working with her 4-H friends and making blankets for community members. “I liked when we made them, doing it as a group made it fun.” Service to others Each year the teens who serve as State 4-H Ambassadors and the delegation who attends the SDSU Extension Teen Leadership Conference, select a service project for all 4-H members and families to participate in. All told, 944 blankets were donated across South Dakota through the 2017-2018 Blanket Buddies service project by 27 county 4-H programs, Teen Leadership Conference and the South Dakota Association of Extension 4-H Professionals. Brookings County received a plaque in recognition of their focus on service to others. “State-wide service projects like, Blanket Buddies, give 4-H members a sense of participating in something much bigger than themselves and their 4-H club,” explained Sonia Mack, SDSU Extension 4-H Youth Program Advisor – Brookings County. 2019 4-H service project The 2018-19 South Dakota 4-H statewide community service project, selected by teen members during the annual SDSU Extension Teen Leadership Conference (TLC) is Soles4Souls. Soles4Souls is an organization empowering groups to host shoe drives, where all donated shoes will go to those in need. More details released soon. To learn more about South Dakota 4-H, contact a 4-H Youth Program Advisor near you. 6 3 ????3???3???36???????  3 ???3?37??????34?3?3???35??????????3?????3???????? General Contractor and Specialist in Steel Building Construction • Pre-engineered, all steel construction • All sizes of buildings available • Material and workmanship warranty • Great Parts • Great Warranty 1007 Broadway Ave Yankton, SD ally contain a lot of fat, sugar and sodium and can cost up to twice as much more as making it at home. Fruits and vegetables that are already cut - they are usually a lot more expensive Junk food (candy, sodas, chips…) Also: Look at serving sizes of each package to determine how much food you will get from that item. Remember, prepared foods cost more than unprepared foods. Lettuce will cost less than bagged salad, just as a chunk of cheese will cost less than grated cheese. Buying fresh potatoes and preparing them yourself is usually cheaper than instant mashed potatoes. To learn more about how to stretch your grocery budget or SNAP funds, contact one of the eight SDSU Extension Regional Centers. Find contact information for SDSU Extension Regional Centers online or below: Aberdeen: 605.626.7120 Lemmon: 605.374.4177 Mitchell: 605.995.7378 Pierre: 605.773.8120 Rapid City: 605.394.2236 Watertown: 605.882.6300 Winner: 605.842.1267 Sioux Falls: 605.782.3290 Brookings County 4-H Members Make & Donate 77 Blankets YOUR RADIATOR HEADQUARTERS! On-Hand & In-Stock! NO WAITING! Evidence-based tips to stretch SNAP funds Below, Walkling and Wilson provide evidence-based tips to meal planning and more. When meal planning be sure to: Know how many people will be at every meal. Plan menus for breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks, writing down all ingredients needed to prepare each item. Check your cupboards, refrigerator and freezer for items you already have. If you do not need it, do not buy it. Organize your list by the layout of the store - this will keep you from backtracking and possibly buying items not on your list. Buy canned or frozen fruits and vegetables rather than fresh. Canned and frozen often cost less and will last longer. Plan the use of leftovers. When safely handled, leftovers can be used in casseroles, soups, for snacks and in lunch boxes. When meal planning try to avoid: Pre-packaged (convenience) foods like bagged salads and individually wrapped slices of cheese. These items are usually more expensive. Frozen or boxed meals. These usu- Athlete Spotlight Specializing in: Agriculture Hay Storage Commerical/Industrial Storage Buildings Fire Halls Schools Community Centers Aviation Proudly Serving: Southeast South Dakota Northeast Nebraska Northwest Iowa Call for your FREE estimate: 605-689-7321 3608 E Hwy 50 • Yankton, SD • www.jamessteelinc.com It’s a Triple Play! 9 3 JGP3[QW3DW[3C3ENCUUKHKGF3CF3KP3 V 3 JG3$TQCFECUVGT32TGUU3KV3CNUQ3 T 3 WPU3KP3VJG38GTOKNNKQP32NCKP36CNM3 C 3 PF3VJG3/KUUQWTK38CNNG[35JQRRGT3 H 3 QT3C3EQODKPGF3EKTEWNCVKQP3QH3  3 3CPF3WR3VQ33 R 3 QVGPVKCN3TGCFGTU Don’t Strike Out With Competitors, Get Your Ad in the Broadcaster Press Today! 201 W Cherry • Vermillion, SD • Phone: 624-4429 • www.BroadcasterOnline.com Rachel Brady Rachel Brady is one of the two seniors for the Vermillion girls’ basketball team. She averages 6.4 points, 5.4 rebounds, and 24 minutes per game. She is also a co-captain for the team. Rachel is not only a leader in basketball but is also a captain on the dance team and was in volleyball. She also participates in track. Rachel is the president of Student Council and Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD), amongst participating in Show Choir, National Honors Society, and Peer Helpers. “There’s never been a time where I haven’t been in season, but in my rare free time, I enjoy hanging out with friends and spending time outside,” said Brady. She also enjoys helping at youth Bible study, running, drawing, and watching movies.
Weather

Fair 59.0 F
Click For More
Conditions:Fair
Temperature:59.0 F
Humidity:46
Wind:West at 16.1 MPH (14 KT)
Dewpoint:37.9 F (3.3 C)
Heat Index:
Windchill:56 F (13 C)


Shopper Issues
February 12, 2019
February 12, 2019
Published On
02-12-2019

February 5, 2019
February 5, 2019
Published On
02-05-2019

January 29, 2019
January 29, 2019
Published On
01-29-2019

January 22, 2019
January 22, 2019
Published On
01-22-2019