Logo

Bookmark and Share


012219_YKBP_A3.pdf



Broadcaster Press 3 January 22, 2019 www.broadcasteronline.com Home Annual Mitchell Soil Health Event Set For February 14 At Highland Conference Center By Daris Howard This week I helped my son as he moved his family across the country to a new home. He has a one-year-old daughter, and the whole episode reminded me of our first move after my wife, Donna, and I were married. We, too, had a one-year-old daughter when we moved from the university where I received my Bachelor’s degree to where I would be going to graduate school. Celese was barely beginning to talk, and our small basement apartment was the only home she had ever known. Because of our limited income, to save money, we did a twelve-hour rental for the moving truck. Donna took me to get the truck at eight o’clock in the morning, then she and I set to work packing it. We already had everything in boxes, and it was just a matter of fitting all of our earthly belongings into it. The whole time we were loading it, Celese was upset at seeing her toys, her bed, and all of the other things that made it home to her being taken away. But when the truck was all packed, and we climbed into it to drive the two-and-a-half hours to our next apartment, she started to sob openly. She seemed to understand that we were leaving and not coming back. As I drove, Donna comforted Celese, and eventually Celese fell asleep. When we pulled up at our new apartment, already exhausted from loading everything, Donna and I started to unload. I brought in a few boxes, and Donna unpacked some of Celese’s favorite toys trying to help her feel more secure in our new home. But instead, she was even more upset, apparently wondering why we were putting the things she loved in this strange place. We finally finished unloading, I swept out the truck, put my bike in it, and headed on the road to take the truck back. I arrived back at the rental store barely before eight o’clock. I checked the truck in, then biked back to our old apartment. I busied myself cleaning and working to finish up all of the things we weren’t able to do before we left. At ten o’clock, my kind landlord stopped by. He looked at me and shook his head. “You look absolutely exhausted. Are you planning to drive back to your family tonight?” When I nodded, he said, “You’ve done enough. You go ahead and go to them, and I will finish this another day.” Donna and I had talked about me staying overnight with my sister who lived near there, but I wanted to be back with my family. I struggled the whole drive to stay awake. But when I finally pulled into the driveway of the apartment building, I looked at the window, and Celese stood there, her little face pressed against the glass, watching for me. The tears were streaming down her face. As I came into the apartment, she ran to me, and I scooped her into my arms. Donna gave me a hug. “I’m glad you came back and are safely here. Celese has cried the whole time you’ve been gone and refused to go to bed. I tried to cuddle her, but she wouldn’t let me. She just kept going to a door and patting it saying, ‘Go home. Daddy.’ I tried to tell her this was home, but it didn’t help. Finally, I told her that you would be coming back, so for the last hour, she has stayed at that window watching for you.” I cuddled my sobbing daughter in my arms, and soon her tears turned to sniffles, and finally subsided completely. As I rocked her, her eyes started to flutter. Just before she fell asleep, she looked up at me and smiled, and said two words. “Home. Daddy.” With that, she drifted off to sleep. She never cried about going home after that. It seemed that even though she was very young, once the three of us were all together again, it was home, even if it was far from the little apartment she was familiar with. She somehow understood what too often many of us forget, that home is not so much a place, but it is about being with those we love. Snap Up a Deal in the Classifieds Call or go online to browse, buy or sell! bp Since 1934 Broadcaster Press 201 W. Cherry, Vermillion 605-624-4429 • www.broadcasteronline.com bp Broadcaster BROOKINGS, S.D. - SDSU Extension will host the annual Mitchell Soil Health Event February 14, 2019 at the Highland Conference Center (2000 Highland Way) in Mitchell. The event will focus on cover crops and their role in nutrient cycling, moisture management and soil biology and includes speakers and vendor booths. The event begins and 9:30 a.m. and runs until 4 p.m. Certified Crop Advisor credits are available. The event is offered at no cost and includes lunch. Topic highlights Cover Crops as a Management Tool - Lee Briese, independent crop consultant from south central North Dakota, will address the challenges of soil degradation, pest management and economic profitability. Briese was named 2016 Consultant of the Year from the National Alliance February Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Benefits To Be Issued Early PIERRE, S.D. – Due to the current federal government shutdown, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Food and Nutrition Services (FNS) has required states to issue February Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits early in order to minimize the potential impact of the lapse in appropriations on SNAP recipients. In South Dakota, February SNAP benefits would normally be available Feb. 10, 2019. To ensure benefits are made available to eligible households, most February SNAP benefits will instead be issued early on Jan. 20, 2019. The funds are not additional funds to SNAP recipients, but rather, an early issuance of February benefits. There is no change to eligibility requirements or the way SNAP benefits are used. “Although the February benefit will be made early, SNAP recipients are encouraged to continue to use their benefits as they normally would to help meet their food needs in February,” said Department of Social Services Interim Secretary, Amy Iversen-Pollreisz. SNAP operates under the requirements of the USDA and helps low-income South Dakotans buy the food they need to stay healthy while they work to regain financial independence. SNAP benefits are not intended to cover all of a family’s or individual’s food costs but does help with purchasing the food needed for a nutritionally adequate diet. For more information on SNAP, please visit dss.sd.gov. is the lead researcher on a large research project, based in South Dakota, that looks at the role cover crops play in nutrient cycling in soils. He will share some initial observations based on the first year of results. Farmer Panel - Area producers will share their experiences with cover crops, no till and livestock integration. Pre-register by February 8 To accommodate for lunch, organizers are asking that attendees pre-register by calling the Davison Conservation District office at 605.996.1564, ext. 3 or email Heidi Rients on or before 5 p.m. February 8. More information and a full agenda for the soil health workshop can be viewed online at the Extension events page or at the SD No-Till Association website. Officers Reelected For Governor’s Tourism Advisory Board PIERRE, S.D. –The Governor’s Tourism Advisory Board has selected its officers for 2019. Ivan Sorbel of Kyle was reelected the board president during a meeting today in Pierre. Kristi Wagner of Whitewood was reelected vice president. “The Department of Tourism is grateful and proud of the service provided by our board members, including the second terms of our president and vice president,” said Jim Hagen, Secretary of the Department of Tourism. “We are fortunate to have leaders like these who care so deeply about tourism in our state. Their guidance, support and knowledge are invaluable to us.” The Tourism Advisory Board is appointed by the Governor and includes members of the tourism industry and citizen representatives from across the state. Board members serve as liaisons and advocates for businesses in their area and the South Dakota Department of Tourism. The board also offers input about marketing strategies for the department. Current Tourism Advisory Board members include Caleb Arceneaux, Rapid City; Tom Biegler, Sioux Falls; John Brockelsby, Rapid City; Ted Hustead, Wall; Ann Lesch, De Smet; Julie Ranum, Watertown; Carmen Schramm, Yankton; Frank Smith, Gettysburg; Ivan Sorbel, Kyle; and Kristi Wagner, Whitewood. The South Dakota Department of Tourism is comprised of Tourism and the South Dakota Arts Council. The department is led by Secretary James D. Hagen. Corn Ethanol Production Plays Important Role In South Dakota’s Economy By Sen. Mike Rounds Corn and corn ethanol production are vital components of South Dakota’s economy. The corn ethanol industry supports thousands of jobs in our state and contributes a significant amount of revenue to our local communities. Corn ethanol has taken a hit in recent years, due in part to the high number of waivers issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to small refineries. This has reduced the amount of ethanol required by the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS), thus reducing the demand for corn and corn ethanol. The RFS is a program created by Congress and administered by the EPA that is aimed at increasing the use of renewable fuels such as corn ethanol in our nation’s fuel supply. The RFS requires 15 billion gallons of corn ethanol to be blended into transportation fuel in 2019. The Senate Environment and Public Works (EPW) Committee, on which I serve, recently held a confirmation hearing for President Trump’s nominee to be EPA Administrator, Andrew Wheeler. Mr. Wheeler currently serves as EPA Acting Administrator Ask About Our Press Carpet Cleaning Special 3 Rooms or up to 301 sq. ft. St. Since 1934 for of Independent Crop Consultants (NAICC) and was the 2017 International Certified Crop Adviser (ICCA) of the Year. He currently works with growers in North Dakota. Regenerating Soils with Microbiology - Kris Nichols, founder and principal scientist of KRIS (Knowledge for Regeneration and Innovation in Soils) Systems. Nichols is a soil biologist by trade, and spent 11 years as a Research Soil Biologist at the USDA Research Station at Mandan, N.D. She will discuss addressing current and future agricultural needs by building upon a soil health foundation and identifying biological methods for agricultural production, tools and practices to help reduce pest issues, soil erosion, fossil fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions. Cover Crop Nutrient Cycling in South Dakota - Anthony Bly, SDSU Extension Soils Field Specialist. Bly 99 $ Call 605-624-2485 to make your appointment today! and was EPA Deputy Administrator before that. The EPW Committee is responsible for oversight of the EPA, which is a job I take very seriously. During Mr. Wheeler’s hearing, I had the chance to ask him about the RFS, including the number of waivers issued by the EPA to small refineries. According to the Renewable Fuels Association, this data shows that for 2016 and 2017, the RFS volumes were effectively lowered by 2.25 billion gallons. The RFS has provided the statutory certainty necessary for the corn industry to grow and thrive, and as a result corn ethanol has become a vital component of our nation’s fuel supply. In granting so many waivers to small refineries, the EPA has effectively reduced the amount of ethanol required by the RFS and reduced the demand on corn and corn ethanol. This underscores the urgent need for year-round sales of E-15, which is 15 percent ethanol blended with 85 percent gasoline. Allowing for year-round sales of E-15 would be a huge win for corn and corn ethanol producers and could result in approximately 700 million additional gallons of ethanol sold, or 280 million additional bushels of corn annually. President Trump has said on a number of different occasions that he supports year-round sales of E-15. I had a chance to reiterate the need for year-round E-15 sales when I was with the president during his visit to South Dakota last fall, and he agreed. I’m pleased Mr. Wheeler agrees for the need of year-round sales of E-15 as well. In a meeting I had with him recently and during his confirmation hearing, he reiterated to us that the administration and the EPA are committed to getting E-15 done before the summer driving season. We intend to hold him to that commitment. An open marketplace with more fuel options for consumers encourages competition and drives down consumer fuel costs. E-15 also lowers evaporative and tailpipe emissions when compared to 10 percent ethanol fuel, improving the environment. Resolving this issue also provides a pathway to increase farm income at a time when producers are struggling with trade uncertainty, a depressed farm economy, low commodity prices and tight margins. I plan to support Mr. Parents and Teachers of Wheeler’s confirmation and Agnes School invite you to a I look forward to working with him on these and other issues at the EPA that impact our state. Ham Dinner * *Some restrictions apply To Kick Off... Catholic Schools Week Sunday, January 27,31st 2019 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM St. Agnes Gym Adults $8 • Students $4 8 Children under 3 are Free Delivery and To Go Dinners are Welcome! Call 624-4144 ParticiPate in the "Silent auction" beginning at 11 a.m. & "live auction" beginning at 12 noon! there will alSo be gameS and craftS for the kidS! Dakota Territory Gun Collectors GUN SHOW Easton Archery Center, E. Hwy. 50, Yankton Sat., Jan. 26th 9am - 5pm Sun., Jan. 27th 9am - 3pm BUY • SELL• TRADE Admission $ 5.00 Concessions Available
Weather

Fair 59.0 F
Click For More
Conditions:Fair
Temperature:59.0 F
Humidity:46
Wind:West at 16.1 MPH (14 KT)
Dewpoint:37.9 F (3.3 C)
Heat Index:
Windchill:56 F (13 C)


Shopper Issues
February 12, 2019
February 12, 2019
Published On
02-12-2019

February 5, 2019
February 5, 2019
Published On
02-05-2019

January 29, 2019
January 29, 2019
Published On
01-29-2019

January 22, 2019
January 22, 2019
Published On
01-22-2019