Logo

Bookmark and Share


071117_YKBP_A8.pdf



8 Broadcaster Press July 11, 2017 www.broadcasteronline.com Market Yourself Broadcaster Press Increase your business’s exposure, build connections and multiply opportunities with effective print advertising. 201 W Cherry St. • Vermillion • 624-4429 Heat Exhaustion & Heat Stroke: Protecting Yourself And Your Employees Former Director Of National Museum Of American History To Visit Pierre, Sign New Book On July 24 PIERRE, S.D. – Brent Glass, former director of the Smithsonian National Museum of American History, is making three appearances in Pierre on Monday, July 24, to promote his new book, “50 Great American Places: Essential Historic Sites Across the U.S.” “As an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution, we are delighted to bring Mr. Glass to South Dakota,” said Jay Smith, director of the Museum of the South Dakota State Historical Society at the Cultural Heritage Center in Pierre. “He brings with him a message about the value of saving, preserving and visiting historic places which is an important aspect of the mission of the South Dakota State Historical Society. We will be discussing some of our future plans with him as well, so this is an exciting opportunity for our museum.” Glass’s 7 p.m. CDT presentation at the Capitol Lake Visitor Center will be the primary opportunity for the public to interact with him. The evening will include a presentation by Glass as well as questions and answers with the audience, followed by a book signing. Books will be available for purchase. Glass will also be the featured speaker at the Pierre-Fort Pierre Rotary Club at noon on July 24. From 1:30-2:30 p.m. on the 24th, Glass will be signing his book at the Cultural Heritage Center. There is no admission fee to come to the book signing, and no formal presentation is planned at the afternoon event. “50 Great American Places” is published by Simon & Schuster. Glass, a historian and the director emeritus of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of History, leads readers on a journey through 50 of the most important cultural and historic sites in the United States. Featuring a foreword from bestselling author David McCullough, this book is part travelogue and part collection of historical essays. Additional information about the events will be available on the South Dakota State Historical Society’s Website at history.sd.gov. The Museum of the South Dakota State Historical Society has been a Smithsonian Affiliate since January of 2013. By Tracey Erickson SDSU Extension Dairy Field Specialist For those whose livelihood depends upon working outdoors or in less than favorable conditions, the coming weeks look to be quite difficult with higher than normal temperatures and humidity predicted. For example, cows still need to be milked and fed, barns are not air conditioned, even though there is emphasis on cow comfort through ventilation and cooling efforts for cows, we sometimes get lax on also protecting ourselves and employees from the effects of the heat. The same goes for those working outdoors, not under roof, maybe stacking hay, de-tasseling corn, construction, youth at livestock or horse shows, horticulture producers picking produce for sale, etc. Personal protection and prevention efforts will be vital as people perform these tasks to prevent heat exhaustion or stroke. People that are at higher risk for heat stroke or exhaustion include the elderly, infants and children (age 0-4), overweight, people who are ill or on certain medications. Please note the following symptoms for heat stroke according to the CDC and Mayo Clinic: A high body temperature (above 103°F). Red, hot and dry skin (no sweating). The one exception is if heat stroke has been brought on by exercising then the skin may feel moist. Rapid, strong pulse. Throbbing headache. Dizziness. Nausea. Confusion. Unconsciousness. Warning Symptoms: Heat exhaustion Heat exhaustion will have similar symptoms and should also be taken seriously as it may worsen and lead to heat stroke if not treated. Medical attention should be sought if symptoms worsen or last for more than an hour. Symptoms are as follows: Heavy sweating. Paleness. Muscle cramps. Tiredness. Weakness. Dizziness. Headache. Nausea or vomiting. Fainting. Personal Protection in the Heat People are vital to many operations and should be treated as an asset. This means we may have to provide for extra breaks to cool down during extreme heat, provide extra fans, shade, access to water and sports drinks, and sun block for people. We will want to encourage wearing light colored Heat Exhaustion & Heat Stroke: Knowing the dif- and light weight, loose-fitting clothing (caution ference should be used if working around PTO’s or equipAccording to the CDC (Center for Disease ment) along with some type of light head covering. Control and Prevention), “heat stroke is the most So if you or someone you work with is experiencserious heat-related illness. It occurs when the ing heat-related illness what can you do? body becomes unable to control its temperature: First, if symptoms are suggestive of a heat the body’s temperature rises rapidly, the sweating stroke you should seek medical attention immemechanism fails, and the body is unable to cool diately. If you are experiencing symptoms of heat down.” Heat stroke can cause death or serious exhaustion or heat cramping the following is sugcomplications such as damage to the brain, heart, gested: Seek shade or air-conditioning if possible. kidneys, and muscles if emergency treatment is not Cool off with damp sheets and a fan. The fan blown provided. The CDC defines heat exhaustion as “a onto the cool, wet sheet will help expedite the milder form of heat-related illness that can develop cooling. Take a cool shower or bath or take a dip after several days of exposure to high temperain a lake or pool if available to help bring the body tures and inadequate or unbalanced replacement temperature down. of fluids.” Rehydrate. Not only should you be drinking Warning Symptoms: plenty of water, approximately every 15 minutes, Heat stroke Recognizing but you may also need to replace salt and minerthe symptoms of heat als which have been excreted during sweating. stroke, along with getThis can be done by drinking some sports drinks. ting emergency medical However, if you have a medical condition that help will be critical in limits salt or fluid intake make sure to consult with deterring permanent your doctor on recommendations for intakes in hot damage or death for weather. people in this situation. Do not drink sugary drinks (such as soda, Kool-aid, or some fruit drinks) or alcoholic beverages to rehydrate. Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church These drinks can actu6th & Jennings • Siouxby KrazyDad Book 63 Challenging Sudoku Puzzles City, IA ally interfere with your body’s ability to conSudoku #5 Sudoku #6 trol your temperature. Lastly, it is important to 6 9 3 1 8 pace yourself, especially if you are not accus7 1 3 7 9 5 tomed to working in 17th 5 2 8 2 8 5 heat. It may take several Annual weeks for a person’s 7 2 6 1 3 Days 7 2 body to adjust to working in a hot environDrive Thru Available 6 1 ment. Finally, it is important 8 9 7 4 5 7 FRI. 5PM-10PM • SAT. 11AM-10PM • SUN. 11AM-3PM to work in pairs during Free Admission 4 2 3 5 8 1 the heat, so that emerBook 63: Answers Intermediate Sudoku Puzzles by KrazyDad Authentic Greek Food, Music, Bake Sale, Church Tours gency care can be adSudoku #1 Sudoku #2 2 6 27 7 58 6 1 7 5 3 7 ministered if necessary 4 2 1 3 9 6 5 8 9 2 4 8 7 5 4 1 2 3 6 9 3 7 6 4 9 5 8 1 2 and symptoms commu8 1 4 3 2 9 3 6 8 5 7 4 2 1 5 8 1 7 3 2 9 6 4 nicated. Lastly, stay cool © 2008 KrazyDad.com © 2008 KrazyDad.com 2 5 7 9 1 8 3 4 6 1 5 2 6 8 9 7 3 4 and hydrated! 7 4 8 2 3 1 6 9 5 8 4 3 5 7 6 1 2 9 4 DAYS ONLY July 13-16 SAVE 70 UP TO % AND FREE DELIVERY GRAND OPENING SLUMBERLAND FURNITURE 6 9 7 4 5 1 8 2 6 1 4 9 7 8 2 5 3 5 8 7 1 2 3 9 4 6 2 9 3 5 6 4 8 1 7 3 Sudoku #7 1 8Sudoku #3 7 8 6 4 9 2 1 7 6 7 1 4 2 3 556 8 3 9 7 8 4 2 4 99 2 1 6 3 7 3 2 6 7 5 8 8 7 3 6 5 9 1 45 3 4 2 9 8 9 6 7 3 5 8 5 1 5 6 8 1 9 9 3 1 9 6 2 8 6 9 8 1 4 9 7 6 2 3 2 8 1 7 4 5 6 3 5 2 7 9 9 1 4 5 6 8 8 7 2 3 1 4 5 6 3 4 9 2 1 2 9 8 5 7 7 4 8 1 3 6 3 7 1 8 7 4 6 5 2 3 2 7 5 3 9 1 8 4 9Sudoku #5 4 5 9 4 4 5 7 7 4 2 1 5 8 3 9 6 4 8 1 2 7 3 5 6 9 8 1 7 © 2008 KrazyDad.com 6 3 4 9 2 5 6 7 2 5 3 7 GOING ON NOW!! 2 Sudoku #7 5 7 2 4 4 3 9 8 8 6 1 7 6 4 3 2 2 9 5 6 1 8 7 3 7 5 8 1 3 2 6 9 9 1 4 5 1 8 9 2 3 6 6 5 5 9 2 8 1 9 4 7 8 9 5 4 6 4 3 7 8 1 3 2 7 7 1 2401 BROADWAY AVE. 3 4 5 7 1 3 2 6 9 2 4 5 6 8 605-665-3719 • YANKTON JULY 28, 29, 30 bpp b Since 1934 B roadcaster Broadcaster Press Press 6 1 9 3 2 4 5 8 7 7 6 2 1 8 9 4 3 5 Fill the puzzle so that every row, every column, and every 4 3 8 6 5 7 2 9 1 section5contain3the numbers 1-9 without repeating a number. 2 4 1 9 Sudoku #8 6 7 8 Since 1934 bp Broadcaster 6 bp B 2 Sudoku #4 6 4 9 7 5 1 2 8 9 4 7 5 3 6 8 1 3 5 7 2 Since 1934 4 9 1 2 6 8 3 6 5 9 3 6 7 8 1 9 1 4 3 2 2 8 5 4 7 Since 1934 4 Press roadcaster 1 3 8 2 3 6 5 7 2 9 1 4 8 4 9 6 7 5 3 8 4 7 2 1 5 2 4 9 6 8 7 5 9 1 6 3 Arrrrre 9 1 6 1 7 5 8 3 1 Press 9 2 Sudoku #6 8 7 6 3 9 2 4 5 5 2 1 6 8 4 9 7 3 4 9 7 5 1 8 2 7 6 5 9 2 8 3 1 9 8 2 4 1 3 7 6 1 3 4 5 6 7 2 9 6 1 7 8 3 9 5 4 4 5 challenging 8 2 7 6 1 3 2 9 3 1 4 5 6 8 1 3 6 6 1 4 5 7 5 4 3 Last tuesday’s Sudoku Solution #8 2 1 4 5 7 3 8 9 8 3 6 4 2 1 6 5 7 1 8 9 3 1 4 5 3 2 7 6 3 6 2 8 9 5 4 8 7 9 4 1 6 5 7 3 1 2 5 4 9 4 9 6 7 3 8 2 5 2 8 9 6 1 7 2 4 5 5 8 2 9 7 © 2008 KrazyDad.com ch BOOK 63 #8 su do ku 6 KRAZYDAD.COM/PUZZLES 7 5 9 2 4 8 9 1 7 3 2 6 8 5 1 4 3 © 2008 KrazyDad.com check next Tuesday’s paper for the solution to today’s puzzle. int BOOK 63 #8 you advertising in the Broadcaster? Watch the “treasure” pile up when you advertise in the 201 W Cherry Vermillion, SD Phone: (605) 624-4429 Fax: (605) 624-2696
Weather

Fair 59.0 F
Click For More
Conditions:Fair
Temperature:59.0 F
Humidity:46
Wind:West at 16.1 MPH (14 KT)
Dewpoint:37.9 F (3.3 C)
Heat Index:
Windchill:56 F (13 C)


Shopper Issues
September 19, 2017
September 19, 2017
Published On
09-19-2017

September 12, 2017
September 12, 2017
Published On
09-12-2017

September 5, 2017
September 5, 2017
Published On
09-05-2017

August 29, 2017
August 29, 2017
Published On
08-29-2017