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2 Broadcaster Press July 11, 2017 www.broadcasteronline.com Appreciation for What We Have Dave Says By Daris Howard Discussing and Negotiating Hands Off the Emergency Fund! Dear Dave, I’ve accepted a promotion that would take me from an hourly wage to Dear Dave, a salaried position. Do you have any Sometimes our budget gets busted because of home improveadvice for negotiating a salary? ments and various other things. I think we should take money J from our emergency fund when this happens, but my wife says it should come out of our restaurant or fun money. What’s your Dear J, opinion? The quick and simple answer to this Josh question is you negotiate it based on what you’re worth to the company. Dear Josh, Now, how do you figure that out? Overspending isn’t an emergency. If you budget a set amount There are a couple of measuring in one category, and you go over that amount, you’ve got to resticks you can use. One is associ- duce something in another area to stay within your budget for ated with the revenue you bring in, the month. Dave and that’s a nice, concrete reference. If something happens on a pretty regular basis, it’s not an emerAnother thing you can do is research some gency, it’s a predictable event. That means you need to budget a of the more reputable career websites and larger amount for home improvements or whatever the problem develop a compensation study based on area may be. comparable positions in your area. On a month-to-month basis, if you have $200 budgeted for houseIf you’re a valuable team member of mine who’s moving from hold repairs, and any work turns out to be $300, I’d rather you cut hourly to salary, it wouldn’t be a “negotiation” — it would be a back on eating out or another non-essential category to make up discussion. Honestly, most positions are priced initially at the the difference. amount you can be replaced for in the new role. In other words, Your wife is right on this one! what’s the going rate for someone in your position? — Dave If it were me, I’d produce two or three well-researched compensation studies. Give them to your bosses, and talk it through with them. Depending on the size of the company, they may not have * Dave Ramsey is America’s trusted voice on money and busidone that much work figuring it out themselves. ness, and CEO of Ramsey Solutions. He has authored seven bestIt’s kind of like deciding what to ask for when you sell a car. You try to appraise it for what it’s worth in the marketplace to other selling books, including The Total Money Makeover. The Dave people. That’s the way you have a discussion. It’s not that you’re Ramsey Show is heard by more than 12 million listeners each telling them what to do or presenting an ultimatum, you’re ask- week on 575 radio stations and multiple digital platforms. Follow ing questions and presenting information. If someone did that in Dave on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daverammy office with a respectful and professional manner, it would go sey.com. a long way. — Dave Ramsey Matching Students With Workforce Needs By Gov. Dennis Daugaard Last week, I was honored to begin a one-year term as chairman of the Western Governors Association. The WGA includes governors of 19 western states – those to the north and south of South Dakota, and every state to the west. Each WGA chair selects a policy initiative to focus on during the chair’s one-year term. Over the next 12 months I will focus on workforce development. South Dakota has one of the lowest unemployment rates in the nation. Although this is a sign of a strong economy, it creates a challenge for our businesses. Many struggle to attract skilled workers in high-need fields such as engineering, information technology, healthcare and the construction trades. The shortage of skilled workers limits businesses’ ability to grow and serve more customers. At the same time, too many young people are unaware of the opportunities that are available to them. More and more good jobs require training beyond a high school diploma. Despite this, only about two-thirds of South Dakota high school graduates go on to further education at a university or technical institute. Although South Dakota is one of the best in the nation in this regard, there is room for improvement. Among those who do pursue additional education after high school, many are unaware of which educational pathways lead to skills or credentials which are in demand and qualify a person for good jobs. We need to do a better job of career counseling. Of course, I want our young people to follow their dreams as they choose schools and careers, but I also want them to have their eyes open as they make those choices. In recent weeks, I have met with a number of leaders of South Dakota school districts, to ask them how we can address this issue. They agreed that one approach is to offer more job- based training in high school. This can take the form of internships, apprenticeships or hands-on learning at the school. For example, in Yankton, many seniors are able to complete their classwork in the morning, so that they can work three hours each afternoon at a paid, work-based internship. In Harrisburg, the high school will begin to offer an “early college” model that allows students who complete their high school coursework to begin to take introductory college classes, using the state’s dual credit program. Madison High School has partnered with several large employers to create work experiences that award credits that transfer to a technical institute. I fully support efforts like this, and I have told school superintendents that the state will do what it can to support these efforts, even if some state rules must be waived or modified. These programs give young people real work experience, so they are more prepared to enter the workforce. In many cases, students get credit toward their high school and technical institute or university education. And students get the opportunity to explore different occupations, to better identify a career that they might pursue after high school – or find that a career is not interesting or suitable for them. Last month, I was among several governors who attended a White House roundtable discussion about workforce development. The discussion included President Trump, Ivanka Trump, U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross, U.S. Secretary of Labor Alex Acosta and U.S. Small Business Administration Director Linda McMahon. The governors present represented every part of the country, and we all face similar challenges. I appreciate the federal focus on this issue, and I hope the Western Governors Association initiative will also contribute. Still, in the end, these are issues that will be solved locally, as school leaders and business leaders join together to do what is right for their communities. Romsdahl’s Dakota Senior Meals Repair & Remodel Carpentry, Decks, Interior & Exterior Painting, Refinishing, Drywall, & Ceramic Tile 18 Years in Business Free Estimates 605-670-2161 This last week we were talking about Independence Day in my classes when the conversation took a direction I didn’t expect. Most of the class was chattering about fireworks, parades, cookouts, and a day off from class. But Tony sat quietly, saying nothing. “Tony, are you doing anything exciting for the Fourth of July?” I asked. “I find Americans to be strange,” Tony replied. “You celebrate freedom without fully appreciating it. There are those like me who are not allowed to immigrate here who would give our lives for what you have. Back in my country many of my people are dying because we don’t have your freedoms.” “What was it like in your country?” I asked. Tony spoke quietly. “My sister and her husband started a small business. A drug cartel told them that they had to pay some money or they would be killed. They paid what they had but the drug cartel didn’t feel it was enough, so they killed my sister and her husband. Then they went to their home and killed their children. The police did nothing. Many of them were paid off by the drug cartel. “The drug cartel told my brother and me that they would kill us if we didn’t join them. My brother did join the cartel, but I loved my sister and her family, and I decided I would rather die than join those who had killed them. So I fled to some relatives who helped me get a student visa to come here to school.” The class had grown silent as they listened to Tony. His voice quivered as he continued. “I would give my life to stay and enjoy the freedoms I have experienced here. But I am not allowed to stay. If I go back, I will most likely be killed, and my own brother will probably be given the assignment to do it. This country was built by people like me seeking a place to be free, people willing to die for that opportunity. But now those of us who understand what it means to lose freedom can’t stay, while many who have freedom don’t appreciate it.” I thought about what Tony had said, and it reminded me of something I had read. I shared it with the whole class. “Tony said some things that relate to what Chief Justice Roberts spoke about at a junior high graduation this week. He told the graduates that he hoped that at times they would be treated unfairly so they could appreciate justice. He hoped they would sometimes have bad luck so they could be conscious of the role of chance in life and realize success is not completely deserved, and neither is failure. He said he hoped they would experience betrayal so they could understand the importance of loyalty. He also hoped they would sometimes know loneliness so they would appreciate good friends. “Chief Justice Roberts also said that pain will help a person learn compassion. He said those who were graduating from there were privileged, but they should not act like it. He told them to always say hello to those raking leaves, shoveling snow, or taking out the trash. “Tony is right. We too often do take the freedoms we enjoy for granted. And Chief Justice Roberts is right that we tend to only appreciate something when we experience its opposite. I hope that does not end up being the case for those rights and privileges we enjoy in this country. “I hope we don’t have to experience hunger and deprivation to appreciate food and prosperity. I hope we never have to see those we love killed in order to appreciate lawfulness. I hope we don’t have to experience misfortune to appreciate our opportunities. “But especially, I hope that we will not have to experience tyranny in order to appreciate democracy. And I pray that we will not have to know oppression to appreciate the freedoms we enjoy.” When I finished and we started class, I knew that what a young man had shared was of greater value than anything else I would be teaching that day. Served at The Main Street Center & Town Square, “Meals on Wheels” Please call before 9:00am to schedule or cancel a meal at 624-7868. Menus listed below are July 12 – July 18. Menus are subject to change without notice. All menus are served with whole grain bread and 1% milk unless otherwise noted. Wednesday – Beef Nachos with Pinto Beans, Strawberries, Peaches, Cranberry Orange Bar Thursday – Hawaiian Chicken Salad, Cream of Broccoli Soup, Acini de Pepe Friday – Cooks Choice Monday – Salisbury Steak, Mashed Potatoes and Gravy, Parslied Carrots, Fresh Fruit Tuesday – Meatloaf, Baked Potato, Lima Beans with Pimento, Pineapple Tidbits, Dinner Roll Vermillion ancake & Sausage P Summer Dinner Lunch Menu Sunday, July 16th 12:00pm – 1:00pm Bergen Lutheran Church Timber Road at Bergen Avenue Good Will Donation Proceeds for “Luther Center” Vermillion Thrivent Funded Traveling for cancer treatment? GET INFUSIONS CLOSER TO HOME. You may be able to travel less to receive your chemotherapy treatments through Sanford Virtual Infusion project. High-quality care from an expert team is available at your local infusion center. Infusions are safely provided by oncology trained nurses who receive virtual oversight by an expert oncology provider. Infusion centers: Douglas County Memorial Hospital, Armour, SD Sanford Vermillion Medical Center, Vermillion, SD Sanford Worthington Medical Center, Worthington, MN 018034-00739 6/17 Talk to your physician about receiving your same treatments closer to home. This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number D04RH2843, Rural Health Care Services Outreach Grant Program, for the amount of $581,727. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. NOTICE TO IRRIGATORS The South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) reminds irrigators to check their center pivots to ensure they are operating properly and are adjusted to spray only upon land authorized for irrigation by their water permit. “It is important that irrigators do everything they can to avoid over spraying onto nearby roads or neighboring properties,” said DENR Secretary Steve Pirner. “Irrigation overspray can damage roadways, lead to unsafe driving conditions, and impact neighbors.” A water right holder is not allowed to waste water or operate an irrigation system in violation of state water law, which includes spraying water on land not covered by the water permit. Irrigation systems and especially end guns must be consistently checked to make sure it is not applying water to where it is not allowed. Irrigators who fail to prevent overspray can be subject to fines or required to appear before the Water Management Board for possible suspension of their right to irrigate. South Dakota has nearly 5,200 active irrigation permits authorizing irrigation of up to 865,000 acres. The Summer Food Program at Jolley Elementary will be serving lunch Monday through Friday from May 30th to July 28th from 11:00 am to 1:00 pm. This meal is FREE to anyone 18 or younger. For more information call 677-7000. Menu listed below is for July 12 – July 18. Menus are subject to change without notice. Wednesday – Super Nachos, Steamed Carrots, Cinnamon Breadstick Thursday – Baked Chicken Nuggets, Golden Corn Friday – BBQ Rib Sandwich, Baked Beans Monday – Baked Crispy Chicken Sandwich, Baked Tater Tots Tuesday – Sub Sandwich, Steamed Broccoli, Carnival Cookie If You Read This... You Know Advertising Pays! Call the Broadcaster at 605-624-4429 or stop by to place your ad today! 201 West Cherry St Vermillion, SD 624-4429
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