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Broadcaster Press 9 October 16, 2018 www.broadcasteronline.com AGC Of SD, Highway-Heavy-Utilities Chapter Wins Prestigious National Award PIERRE – The Associated General Contractors of South Dakota HighwayHeavy-Utilities Chapter was recently awarded the AGC of America (AGCA), 2018 “Small Chapter of the Year” Award! The presentation took place during an awards luncheon in Washington, D.C. in conjunction with the AGCA’s National Chapter & Leadership Conference and their 100 Year Centennial Celebration. The AGC of America recognizes Chapters which have developed outstanding programming and excelled at achieving tangible accomplishments during the calendar year. Noteworthy HHU achievements include our Workforce Development Efforts, Public Relations Campaigns, AGC Charity Work - "AGC Cares", Workzone Awareness Activities, Membership growth and Legislative Representation. “We are honored to be chosen as the 2018 AGC of America “Small Chapter of the Year” and bring home this prestigious award to South Dakota. This award shows how outstanding our member- ship, chapter leaders and staff really are. We are proud to represent the construction industry,” said Toby Crow, Executive Vice-President in the AGC of South Dakota, HHU Chapter. The AGC of South Dakota, HighwayHeavy-Utilities Chapter (AGC of SD, HHU), is a voluntary trade association of almost 250 contractors, suppliers and service firms who build the roads, bridges and water/wastewater infrastructure in South Dakota. Weather Creating Harvest Challenges For Soybean Growers BROOKINGS, S.D. - Fall 2018's cool, damp weather has put the brakes on many acres of soybean harvest this year. "This year has been the perfect storm of late season moisture and temperature to cause harvest and seed quality issues," said Sara Bauder, SDSU Extension Agronomy Field Specialist. "We cannot always avoid these problems, but salvaging the best harvest possible and managing for next year should be first priority." To aid South Dakota soybean growers, Bauder, together with Laura Edwards, SDSU Extension State Climatologist and Connie Strunk, SDSU Extension Plant Pathology Field Specialist, share best practices. Late harvest "Although South Dakota has seen late harvest seasons in the past, this year is testing many farmers' patience considering the wet weather of the past few weeks and current climate outlook," Edwards explained. Edwards references data from the High Plains Regional Climate Center, explaining that October started out very wet, following on the heels of an exceptionally wet September. "In the Sioux Falls' area, 9.5-inches of rain was reported between September 1 and October 9," Edwards said. "This excessive moisture has made field access impossible and stalled grain drying in field." Edwards added, "Cool temperatures have further limited evaporation and the ability to dry grain in the field." Drier weather predicted Although current forecast models predict drier weather ahead, (as of October 10, 2018), with cool temperatures gradually moving east, Edwards said even if predictions are true, they will not help South Dakota's soybean growers much. "There is limited ability to warm up subfields to be harvested above stantially at the end of October, as days are 13 percent this year if dry shorter and we have lower sun angle than weather is not predicted in mid-summer," Edwards said. "The addisoon," Bauder said. tional moisture in the soils and atmosphere As soybean pods mature also limits warming and grain drying after and turn brown, seed the rain ends." moisture begins to decrease Drying quickly. Bauder said for most, the best case In a three-year Iowa State scenario this soybean harvest is to wait out University study, researchthe weather. ers found that soybeans' dry "This means, waiting until the precipitadown weight was affected tion stops and the sun comes out, making by maturity group selection, "However, when balancing the forecast and soils dry enough for field traffic-ability and planting date, and year. drying costs with potential quality issues, hopefully lowering seed moisture content," The study found in the first 12 days each producer needs to consider what is she said. after plant maturity begins, soybeans dried Based on multiple factors, many prorapidly at 3.2 percent per day. Then, after 12 best for their operation." Consult nutritionist before feeding ducers have made the decision to store days, dry down was stabilized at approxiinfected soybeans soybeans on-farm. Some of these factors mately 13 percent moisture (Figure 1). If soybeans are heavily affected by a include: Grain quality issues late season fungi, they may reflect poor •Farmers holding over old grain Depending upon how long crops may seed quality. And, Strunk said that although •Many commercial outlets only acceptneed to remain in the field, grain qualthese soybean fungi are not known for ing dry soybeans (less than 13 to 14 percent ity may become a concern, because toxicity, a livestock nutritionist should be moisture) certain diseases thrive in current weather consulted before adding any soybeans to a •Increased commercial storage costs in conditions,explained Strunk. feeding ration. some areas "Many fungal soybean diseases, such as When storing infected grain, Strunk said •Current market outlook Diaporthe pod and stem blight, Frogeye leaf keeping it dry is key to preventing further "For long-term storage of soybeans spot, Anthracnose and many other secondcolonization and maintain the best seed (several months up to a year), it is recomary fungi, can impact seed quality," Strunk quality possible. mended to dry soybeans down to 11 persaid. "We can avoid re-occurrence of some of cent moisture," Bauder said. "With drying Strunk said that at this point in the these late season diseases by implementfacilities available on-farm, some producers season, soybean growers' main concerns ing crop rotation, planting resistant lines in may choose to harvest wet beans, but othare moisture and storage temperatures to 2019, utilize a fungicide seed treatment and ers will most likely wait out the damp fall as prevent spoilage during storage. long as reasonably possible." "The best way to protect your crop from regularly scouting for disease infestation on stems and pods," Strunk said. 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